CHP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 701

deployed as skirmishers in front of the mouth of the Roost. After driving in the skirmishers of the enemy, about 4 o'clock in the afternoon, with four companies of the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio, namely, Company I, Captain Robinson; B, Captain Clason; G, Captain Patrick, and H, Captain Spaulding; two companies of the One hundred and thirteenth Ohio, two companies of the Seventy-eighth Illinois, under charge of Major Green, and one com- pany of the Thirty-fourth Illinois, I charged, and carried the mouth of; Buzzard Roost Gap. Company A, of theThirty-fourth Illinois, at the same time carried the hill on the right of the railroad and im- mediately south of the gap, a gallant act, for which the company and its commander deserve special mention. On our advance to the mouth of the gap the enemy withdrew to his trenches and earth- works beyond, making the capture an easy one. In the advance Pri- vate Alexander Gandy, of Company I, was wounded. We lay at the mouth of Buzzard Roost Gap until the morning of May 12, 1864, - ~ when we moved to the right toward Snake Creek Gap; reached the .. imofth of Snake Creek Gap about dark and halted for supper. We marched all night, passed through the gap, and arrived next morn- ing in Sugar Valley. During the afternoon we moved to the front, leaving all knapsacks and baggage in the valley, and did picket duty for the Second Division, which was massed in front of the enemy's intrenched position at Resaca. On the 14th, at the battle of Resaca, the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio was in the second line and was not engaged. During the engagement Private James F. Lint, of Company F, was wounded. Early on the evening of the 14th wewithdrew to the rear, drew two days' rations, and took up a posi- tion on the right of the front line, which we intrenched close up to the enemy's lines. During the night of the 15th the enemy retreated across the Coosa River. On the morning of the 16th we marched back to Sugar Valley for knapsacks and baggage, and drew two days' additional rations, and at 2 p. m. took up the line of march for BRome, the expedition, consisting of the Second Division, Four- teenth Army Corps, under command of General Jefferson C. Davis. Although the weather was very warm and the men were much fatigued and worn out, we reached Rome, a distance of thirty-two miles from Sugar Valley, and drove in the enemy's skirmishers by 3 o'clock on the afternoon of the 17th. On the afternoon of the 17th, after having driven the enemy into his earth-works, he sallied out and charged us, making an energetic effort to drive us back. He was repulsed and driven back, with but slight loss to us, but heavy loss to himself. The One hundred and twenty-first Ohio was posted to cover the artillery, and had no casualties. It was now night, and nothing more could be accomplished for the darkness. During the night our entire line was intrenched. Early on the morning of the 18th Captain Clason, of Company B, who was in charge of the bri- gade picket-line, notified me that the enemy had left and that he was occupying the enemy's works with the skirmishers of the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio. I sent the information to Colonel Mitchell, commanding the brigade, who sent me an order during the day, hereunto attached, and markedA,* complimenting the regiment and Captain Clason for being first inside the enemy's breast-works at Rome, Ga. The enemy, consisting of General French's division of infantry and a brigade of Texas cavalry, retreated across the Etowah and Oostenaula, burning the bridges over both streams. In addition to 6 pieces of artillery captured here, we also secured a *Not found. 709 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. large amount of tobacco and cotton and extensive machine-shops for the manufacture of heavy ordnance. The One hundred and twenty-first rested on the north side of the river, where they were supplied with shoes and clothing and enabled to get plenty of vege- tables to eat, until the 23d of May. On the evening of the 23d we moved to the south side of the Coosa River. On the morning of the 24th we took up the line of march for Dallas, Ga.; arrived at Cave Spring and camped for the night; Private Samuel Henry, Com- pany G, was wounded by the premature discharge of his gun. Moved on the 25th and bivouacked near Dallas, Ga. On the 27th moved into position and intrenched a line on the left of the Fif- teenth Corps, on what is called the Dallas line. On the 28th and 29th occupied the trenches; no casualties, though the enemy shelled our line. On the 30th the regiment was deployed as skirmishers across a gap of over a mile between General Hooker's right and General Davis' left; was relieved on the morning of the 31st by the Thirty-fourth Illinois, and returned to the trenches of the 27th. On the 31st Maj. John Yager, who was on duty in Ohio, returned and joined the command. On the 1st of June the army abandoned the right of the Dallas line, our division moving to the left and relieving a division of the Twenty-third Corps, the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio occupying the front line of temporary works erected by the Twenty- third Corps. We occupied these works during the 2d and 3d of June. On the 2d Private William S. Bergen, of Company A, was severely wounded while on the skirmish line. In our front the enemy's works were within seventy-five yards. On the 4th of June we moved to the left of the Fourth Corps. On the night of the 4th, while lying in camp, Corporal Preston V. Lepert, of Company D, was severely wounded by a stray ball in the left thigh. On the night of the 4th the enemy left his position in our front. We rested in our position during the 4th and 5th, and on the 6th moved to within one and a half miles of Acworth, went into camp, and rested until the 10th. On the 11th we moved forward and took up a posi- tion near the log house. On the 12th and 13th rested in trenches; all quiet. On the 14th moved and took up a position, with our left resting on the railroad, two miles south of Big Shanty. On the 15th built a strong line of works. On the 16th we advanced one-quarter of a mile and built a new line of works. Casualties on the 16th were 3-Privates Jacob B. Brown, Company G, by minie, in the thigh, since dead; Charles Owen, Company E, by musket-ball in leg, slight; Under-cook Matthew Moore, colored, by musket-ball in leg, since dead. On the 17th the regiment occupied trenches; no casualties. On the evening of the 18th we advanced our line, driving in the en- emy's skirmishers. Three companies of the One hundred and twenty- first Ohio, on the skirmish line, namely, A, D, and K; casualties, 1 killed-Private Chester Bartholomew, of Company D, and 2 wounded-Privates John W. Clifton, of Company D, and John Reid, of Company K. Our skirmishers pushed their skirmish line to within a few yards of the enemy's trenches. During the night the enemy retreated from his strong line of fortifications in our front, and took up his position on the Kenesaw Mountain. On the 19th we followed up the enemy and took up our position at the base of the Kenesaw. The enemy planted his batteries on the top of the Kenesaw, from which position he shelled the woods and camps back from the base of the mountain, doing much damage. I had pushed my line so .OAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 703 close to the base of the mountain as to make it impossible for him to depress his guns sufficiently to injure my command. The One hundred and twenty-first Ohio occupied this position from the 18th until the morning of the 26th, and during all the time only 1 man was injured by their shelling, which was without cessation, namely, William HIammil, of Company F, who was wounded in the arm. During the same time there were 3 men wounded in the regiment, viz: Privates John A. Chapman, of Company I; Philip Vanderan, of Company I, and Abraham Drake, of Company I; 1 man killed, Peter Strine, of Company B, by the enemy's sharpshooters, and 1 man, Private Stiles Simpkins, of Company F, wounded, by an im- perfect shell from one of our own guns. On the morning of the 26th the regiment was relieved before day and moved to the right, where it rested with the brigade, in the rear of the first line, until the morning of the 27th. On the morning of the 27th of June, in accordance with orders, I held my command ready to move at day- light. Leaving the sick to guard the knapsacks, tents, and cooking utensils, which I had been ordered to leave behind, we moved out and formed, the Second Brigade being on the right of the line that was to storm the enemy's works. The formation was a column of regiments closed in mass. Our column was four regiments deep. In the front line was the One hundred and thirteenth Ohio; just be- hind the One hundred and thirteenth was the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio; next was the Ninety-eighth Ohio, and next was the Seventy-eighth Illinois, while the Thirty-fourth Illinois was deployed as skirmishers in front of the column. My orders were to overlap the One hundred and thirteenth Ohio two companies to my right, making the right guide of my third company the guide of my regiment, which I ordered to cover the right guide of the regiment in front, and ordered the two right companies to guide left. The other regiments, I understood, were to form in echelon, guiding and overlapping in like manner. I was also instructed to deploy my regiment to the right when I struck the enemy; that my left would probably strike an angle in the enemy's works, and that I would have to wheel my regiment to the left, and that I would be supported on my right by the regiments in my rear. I deployed my regiment as I raised the hill in front of the enemy's works, and uncovering the angle at the very point at which I had been advised I would find it, I started my regiment upon a left wheel, my left already resting well up toward the enemy's works. The enemy still was reserving his fire, and continued to do so until my command got close up to his ditches on the right, when he opened upon my single line with grape and canister from both flanks and a full line of small-arms from my front. On the left, from the first volley from the enemy, the captain of Company B was mortally wounded; the captain of Company G was shot dead; the captain of Company E was shot through the ankle and carried from the field, from which wound he has since died, while the major who was in charge of the left received three mortal wounds, from which he died before he could be taken from the field. Company I had lost 29 out of 56 men she took into action. Their commander, Captain Robinson, was wounded in the knee, and the only commissioned officer now on the left, while most of the sergeants were either killed or wounded. In Company B all of them were either killed or wounded. The enemy now opened another battery from an angle in his works on my right. On this flank I was entirely without support. Be. 704 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. lieving it would be impossible to carry the strong position of the enemy with my now weak and thin line, I closed my regiment to the right and withdrew some twenty paces to the rear, and had my command to lie down, where the formation of the ground offered some protection, and where I would be prepared for any counter- charge the enemy might make, ordering my men to keep a constant fire on the enemy to keep him inside his trenches and prevent him from getting possession of my wounded. Having made these dispositions,' I sent a written statement of my position to Colonel Mitchell, com- manding the brigade, who sent me orders to refuse my right and hold and intrench my position, if I could do it without too great a sacrifice. Leaving one-half of my men on the line to keep up the fire, with the other half I built a line of earth-works in the rear of the line under cover of the woods, refusing my right, and at night-fall withdrew my line behind my earth-works. Having my line thus made safe and secure, my next care was for my dead and wounded. Many of them had lain in the hot sun all day without even water to moisten their parched lips, but they were so situated that it was impossible for me to remove them or get them any assistance whatever. Every. effort to go to the wounded during the day on my left resulted in either the killing or wounding of those who attempted to go to their relief. In the engagement I lost 3 officers killed and 3 wounded, 15 non-commissioned officers and privates killed and 123 wounded. Two of them, who were wounded in the outside ditch of the enemy's works, were captured. The loss was a severe one to my command. How much we damaged the enemy I do not know, but my opinion is their loss was small, as they fought behind heavy earth-works. We fought the flower of the Southern army, being Cheatham's division, of Hardee's corps. We succeeded in making a lodgment so close up to their works as to compel them to evacuate four days afterward. On the night of the 28th the enemy, grow- ing uneasy about the tenacity with which we held on to our position so close to their works, charged us and attempted to drive us away. We repulsed him with the small loss of 5 men wounded. On the night of the 2d of July the enemy, having discovered that we were building a new parallel still closer to his lines, evacuated all his earth-works and forts and withdrew beyond the town of Marietta to a prepared line of heavy works near the Chattahoochee River. In following up to this last position the One hundred and twenty- first Ohio, while skirmishing with the enemy on the 9th of July, had 3 men wounded. On the night of the 10th the enemy withdrew all his forces across the river. From the 10th to the 17th my regiment rested in camp on the north bank of the Chattahoochee, near the railroad crossing. On the morning of the 17th we broke up camp and crossed the Chattahoochee at Pace's Ferry. After cross- ing the river a line was formed at right angles with the river and moved down the river in the direction of Peach Tree Creek, the enemy retreating as we advanced. During the night Companies H and F, under command of Capt. Jeff. J. Irvine, acting as skirmishers on our right flank, drove the enemy from a fort on the bank of the river and occupied it. On the morning of the 18th I was sent out with my regiment to make a reconnaissance. I advanced to the Peach Tree Creek, driving the enemy before me and across the river. As he withdrew his forces he burnt the bridge. Having reported my operations, I was ordered to hold the line from the mouth of the Peach Tree to Nancy's Creek, a line three-quarters of a mile in CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 705 length. The enemy occupied a strong line of trenches and a large fort immediately in my front. On the night of the 18th Companies B and E, under charge of Captain Robinson, who was assisting me now in the management of the regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Law- rence, having gone to the rear sick on the 17th, leaving me without a field officer, erected a temporary bridge across the Peach Tree and built intrenchments on the south side. On the morning of the 19th the enemy opened early upon my line and made a vigorous effort to drive my companies back across the river. All day long and until late at night they kept up a heavy fire all along my line, killing 1 man of Company E and wounding 1 man of Company K and 1 man of Company E. My command returned the fire vigorously, expend- ing - rounds of cartridges. A deserter, who swam the river and came to us under cover of the night, informed me that we had damaged the enemy very seriously, killing and wounding, in addi- tion to 2 commissioned officers, many of their men. Before daylight on the morning of the 20th I crossed four addi- tional companies over the Peach Tree, and at daybreak, with six companies (A, F, G, and E, of the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio, and two companies of the Thirty-fourth Illinois that had been sent to assist me), I drove the euemy from their two lines of rifle-pits in my front into his main fort on my right, on the south side of the river, near the ruins of the railroad bridge. During this advance the other companies of my regiment were posted on the north side of the Peach Tree to cover my retreat should I be driven back. After carefully examining the enemy's position and works I had just completed my arrangements to charge the enemy's forts at 3 o'clock '- when a staff officer from General Davis brought me orders to with- draw my command to the north bank of the Peach Tree, at the same time informing me that the command that had crossed above me, and which I supposed was still on my left, had been withdrawn for some two hours. In obedience to orders I immediately withdrew across the Peach Tree. The enemy did not follow me up. On the 21st, the enemy having withdrawn from his line south of the Peach Tree, with my regiment I rejoined the brigade some three miles to my left. On the morning of the 22d we moved out and took up a position on the right and south of the railroad within three miles of Atlanta in front of the enemy's works, our right resting near the old mill, built intrenchments, and rested here behind our works until the morning of the 28th, doing only the customary picket duty. July 28, the division, under command of General Morgan, made a recon- naissance to the right toward Sandtown; returned and took up a position at 12 o'clock at night near White Hall. On the 29th ad- vanced our line across the battle-field of the 28th, making recon- naissance to the front. Found the enemy's dead unburied and many of their wounded uncared for. On the 30th advanced our line again to the front and right, the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio acting as skirmishers. On the 31st made a part of division reconnaissance to the right and front, and returned to camp at dark. Rested in camp on the 1st, 2d, and 3d of August. On the 4th moved early in light marching order, Second Division to support First and Third Divisions on a charge on the right. Advanced our lines some two miles and halted for the night. On the morning of the 5th moved forward and took up a new position fronting the Sandtown road. Before we succeeded in getting into position the enemy opened his batteries and shelled my line, our line being about 45 R R-VOL XXXVIII, PT I s c _ bS4:fl OFF:~~~~~Awwonowww 706 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. at right angles with the angle in his works from which he shelled us. My command immediately set to work and threw up works and built traverses, and during the. time they were building them the enemy shelled them from both the front and flank, wounding I offi- cer and 2 men. Notwithstanding the heavy shelling and exposed position, when they were unable to reply, every man stuck to his post, and within an hour they had made themselves entirely safe and secure. On the night of the 5th my regiment moved forward and occupied a new line 400 yards in front. This was a most exposed position. On the 6th, although we had made every possible protec- tion in the shape of earth-works, my command had 1 man killed and 3 wounded. On the 7th we advanced and drove the enemy from two lines of earth-works. In this advance I lost 9 men wounded. We punished the enemy severely, captured a number of prisoners and small-arms, and turned the enemy's second line of works against him. On the 8th, 9th, and 10th the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio was on a reconnaissance to the right to watch the enemy's cav- alry, which was said to be maneuvering on the Sandtown road to get to our rear to destroy our trains. My skirmishers came up with and drove away a few cavalrymen from our right, after which the com- mand supplied itself plentifully with green corn, potatoes, and veg- etables, and returned on the 11th and occupied a position to the right of the position we left on the 8th that had been intrenched by the Twenty-third Corps. We occupied this position, where we were con- stantly annoyed by the enemy's sharpshooters, until the 27th of the month, when we started on the flank movement which resulted in the capture of Atlanta. During the time my command occupied this line I lost 1 officer wounded, 1 man killed and 7 wounded. The enemy's position here was on a height on the opposite side of a mill-dam, where the ground was higher than our position, giving them the advantage. We moved on the morning of the 27th to the right. On the morning of the 28th, passing through the intrenched line of the Fourth Corps, our corps turned the head of the column toward the Montgomery railroad. The One hundred and twenty- first Ohio was in the advance, and soon after passing the earth- works of the Fourth Corps I came upon the enemy posted upon a hill, across a small stream with a wide and almost impassable swamp in their front. Six companies, were deployed as skirmishers, namely, A, F, D, I, K, and H, the other four acting as a reserve. They advanced and drove the enemy from his position in a most gallant manner, severely damaging him. In this advance I lost 1 man killed, 2 officers wounded, and 6 men wounded. The enemy consisted of Ross' brigade of cavalry. The column now advanced and we moved on, driving the disorganized brigade before us for five miles, with our skirmishers across the Montgomery railroad. where we first destroyed.the telegraph wire. About 1 p. m. took up a part of the railroad track and posted my command across the rail- road and waited for the column to come up. We then went into position about one and a half miles south of the railroad and intrenched. We occupied this position until the morning of the 30th. On the 30th moved in the direction of the Macon railroad. On the afternoon of the 31st* moved with the division in sup- port of the Third Division to the Macon railroad. The Four- teenth Army Corps rested. with its left on the railroad. The Second Divsiion was the right division of the corps, and the Second Brigade the right of the division, and the One hundred and *So in original, but the succeeding account appears to be descriptive of events occurring on September 1. CHA. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 707 twenty-first Ohio was in the second line on the right of the brigade. About 4 o'clock we charged the enemy's position. Just as we advanced to the charge the Thirty-fourth Illinois was posted on my right; to my front and right was the Seventy-eighth Illinois. I was now ordered to leave one-half of my regiment with one-half of the Thirty-fourth Illinois to intrench a position for our protection should we be driven back. In order to have all the companies rep- resented in the charge I left the rear rank and moved on with the front. We passed over the enemy's works in our front, when a staff officer from Colonel Mitchell brought me orders to hasten to the right to the support of the Seventy-eighth Illinois. I moved on double-quick, by the flank, to the right about 200 yards, through the woods, and found the Seventy-eighth Illinois had possession of a 6-gun battery, from which it had driven all of the enemy that it had not either killed or captured. Simultaneous with my arrival the Thirty-fourth Illinois came up. Our arrival was in good. time; the enemy had rallied and was coming back upon the Seventy- eighth Illinois (which had already lost largely) in heavy force. But he was turned back from this, and another attempt to retake the guns was most severely punished. The guns were captured by the Seventy-eighth Illinois. The One hundred and twenty-first Ohio and the Thirty-fourth Illinois held the guns and repulsed two des- perate charges of the enemy to retake the battery. The second charge was made about 6 o'clock, and from this time until darkness put an end to the conflict the battle raged fiercely. During the night the enemy retreated, leaving his dead upon the field, and his wounded in and about Jonesborough. He left many arms and accouterments scattered over the field. The victory was complete; the enemy had fled in confusion. Cleburne's division, the pride of the Southern army, whose boast had been "they had never been whipped," was whipped and captured, with all their guns, by the old Second Division, from behind their strong line of earth-works. Sherman's army had struck their center, divided and routed their army, and compelled the evacuation of Atlanta. After collecting the spoils of the victory we returned, and are now in camp near Atlanta. Throughout the long and tedious campaign the officers, non-com- missioned officers, and men of my command have been at their posts and did their duty. I know of no instance during the cam- paign of any part of my command-officers, non-commissioned offi- cers, or privates-failing in the performance of his or their duty. I know of no circumstances so trying or hour so gloomy in the cam- paign (although I have lost in killed and wounded more than one- half of the armed and equipped men with which I started on the campaign) as to cause my men to lose hope or fail to have perfect confidence in our final success. ' I started with 429 non-commissioned officers and men, armed and equipped, and 18 commissioned officers. Of the officers, 3 were killed on the battle-field on the 27th of June; 1 was mortally wounded and 8 others have been wounded. Of the non-commissioned officers and men? 22 have been killed and 185 have been wounded, making a total of 218. Two that were wounded in the outside ditches of the enemy's works on the 27th of June were captured and 1 is missing. Among the dead we mourn the gallant Maj. John Yager. Absent on duty in Ohio when the cam. paign commenced, he asked to be relieved and hastened to join his regiment. His high sense of honor would not permit him to be ab- 708 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. sent from nis command in the hour of peril and aanger. He joined us at Dallas on the 30th of May, and in less than a month, on the 27th of June, at the assault upon the enemy's works at Kenesaw, at his post on the left of the regiment, cheering on the men, he received three mortal wounds, from which he died before he could be taken from the field. He was a brave man, a true soldier, and loved by the entire command. At the same time and from the same volley the accomplished scholar and soldier, Capt. M. B. Clason, received two mortal wounds, from which he died upon the field, while gal- lantly leading his company in the charge; also, the young, brave, and dashing Captain Patrick, of Company G, who had before been wounded at Chickamauga and had just been promoted, fell pierced through the heart while cheering and leading on his men. Captain Lloyd, who had just recovered from a most severe wound, with his accustomed determination to overcome all obstacles, and who had pushed up to the very ditches of the enemy with the small remnant of his company, received a mortal wound, afterward promoted major, and since died. The gallantry and bravery of Captain Rob- inson, of Company I, throughout the campaign entitles him to be specially mentioned. I desire also to acknowledge my many obliga- tions to him for the able assistance he has been to me in the man- agement of the regiment as acting major since the 17th of July, when Lieutenant-Colonel Lawrence was taken sick, leaving me with- out a field officer. The gallantry and bravery also of Capt. D. H. Henderson, of Company K, who was severely wounded in the charge made by the enemy to retake the guns captured in front of Jones- borough. The following officers also deserve special mention for gallantry: Capt. S. B. Morehouse, Company D; Capt. T. C. Lewis, Company H; Capt. J. J. Irvine, Company B; Capt. C. P. Cavis, Company A; Lieut. A. A. Corrello, Company F; Lieut. M. E. Willoughby, Company G; Lieut. John J. Miller, Company E; Lieut. B. A. Banker, Company C; Lieut. James H. Ball, Company G. My adjutant, M. H. Lewis, and Surgeon Hill both did their entire duty, and have my thanks. The health of Lieutenant-Colonel Law- rence has been such the greater part of the campaign as to render him unfit for duty. The instances among the non-commissioned officers and men deserving special notice are too numerous to men- tion. The gallant conduct of themselves and their fallen comrades on the many hard-contested fields of the campaign has made for them and the regiment names that will live forever. H. B. BANNING, Colonel, Commanding 121st Ohio Vol. Infantry. Capt. J. S. WILSON, Assistant Adjutant-General. No. 140. Report of Lieut. Col. James W. Langley, One hundred and twenty- fifth Illinois Infantry, commanding Third Brigade. HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., SECOND DIV., 14TH ARMY CORPS, Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864. SIR: Pursuant to directions from division headquarters, of date the 6th instant, I have the honor to report. so far as my information ~~~~~~~~~~--- 7- , - -...... -I ,"' .....-..~? 11 1- ....... ....._11 ~ Il_'-_%-,_ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~_7 ,~f l-,-- -L . . . . . . . . . ~ .~"~ '........ CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 709 extends, the operations of this brigade from the 3d day of May, 1864, when it struck tents and broke up camp at Lee and Gordon's Mills, until its arrival at Atlanta, on the 4th day of the present month. Being the fourth brigade commander since the campaign begun, and having served on the corps staff for some time before and up to the 27th of June last, I am compelled to rely chiefly for data upon the necessarily confused memoranda of the different commanders who preceded me. On the 3d of May last the brigade, composed of the Twenty-sec- ond Indiana Veteran Volunteers, Eighty-fifth, Eighty-sixth, and One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois Volunteers, and the Fifty- second Ohio Volunteers, commanded by Col. Daniel McCook, left Lee and Gordon's Mills on the same day it broke up camp and marched to Ringgold, Ga., where, toward night, it crossed the Chickamauga River and joined the division, then commanded by Brig. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, and bivouacked until the morning of the 5th of May, when the brigade marched out to near Catoosa Springs and again bivouacked until the morning of the 7th, when it marched beyond Tunnel Hill about two miles, part of the time under heavy fire from the enemy's batteries. On the morning of the 8th of May the brigade marched toward and confronted the enemy's skirmishers guarding the entrance to Buzzard Roost Gap. May 9, supported the First Brigade skirmish line. May 10, the brigade lay under the fire from the enemy's sharpshooters, In the evening of this day it moved to the front and relieved the First Brigade; Fifty-second Ohio deployed as skirmishers. May 11, re- mained on the line until dark, at which time it was relieved by a brigade of the Fourth Army Corps. We then moved up the valley about two miles and bivouacked for the night. At day- break May 13 command marched toward Resaca by way of Snake Creek Gap, reaching the mouth of the gap, after a tiresome march, at about 8 p. m.; continued the march until nearly 2 a. m. next day, when the command halted until daylight; here we took breakfast, and then moved beyond the line of intrenchments toward Resaca, and rested until evening; took up position at night in rear of First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps; moved in line next day and con- fronted the enemy in their works at Resaca; remained thus until the enemy evacuated that place, when this brigade, in connection with the division, was ordered to Rome. The march commenced early, Third Brigade in the rear, with the One hundred and twenty- fifth Illinois detached as guard for division train; went into camp late at night on left-hand side of Rome road; resumed march next morning at daylight, following the Second Brigade; arrived within two miles of Rome at 5 p. m.; enemy reported to be in their works in force. Colonel McCook immediately disposed the brigade in order of battle as follows: The Twenty-second Indiana and the Eighty-sixth Illinois in the front line, the Fifty-second Ohio and Eighty-fifth Illinois in the second line, with three companies from the Twenty-second Indiana thrown forward as skirmishers. The front line occupied an elevation of ground known as Howe's Hill, with the left resting near Howe's house. The lines were but just formed when the enemy made a vigorous attack upon the Twenty- second Indiana, throwing it in some confusion and pressing its right back about sixty yards, where it rallied behind a rail fence. A part of the Eighty-sixth Illinois in the mean time was pouring a well- directed fire from its right into the enemy's advancing lines. This 710 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. had the effect to check them. At the same time the Fifty-second Ohio advanced and relieved the Twenty-second Indiana. By this time it became so dark that but little could be discovered of what was going on; but by cautiously advancing the skirmish line we soon ascertained that the enemy had retreated to their intrench- ments. To be prepared for an attack in the morning a light line of works was constructed during the night. During this night the enemy evacuated their works and moved across the Oostenaula River, burning the bridges after them. May 18, early, the Eighty- fifth Illinois crossed and occupied the town. May 19, the entire brigade crossed in newly constructed pontoons and encamped in the suburbs of the town, where it remained, doing various military duties, until the morning of the 24th of May, when it marched with the division toward Dallas, reaching that place about noon May 26 and took up position about a half mile to the left of town; remained thus until the next morning, when we moved to the mouth of Gap. Here the brigade was placed in single line, with the One hun- dred and twenty-fifth Illinois deployed as skirmishers. At about 10 o'clock of the night of the 27th of May the enemy attacked the skirmish line and captured 1 commissioned officer and 14 enlisted men, when a countercharge was made, which resulted in the capture of 2 commissioned officers and 27 enlisted men from the enemy. The officers and enlisted men of the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois on this occasion displayed that coolness and bravery so essential to success. The brigade lay in this position several days, holding works. June 1, it moved to the left and relieved a brigade of the Twenty- third Corps, remaining in this new position, under a constant fire from the enemy, until June 4, when it moved about three miles farther to the left and, with the division, rejoined the corps. The brigade performed the various duties imposed upon it (sometimes skirmishing with the enemy, building fortifications, changing posi- tions, and holding works built by others), but all without taking an active part in any general engagement until the morning of the 27th of June, when it was disposed in order of battle as follows: Eighty- fifth Illinois, commanded by Colonel Dilworth, deployed as skir- mishers, with lines of battle composed of-first, the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois; second, the Eighty-sixth Illinois; third, Twenty-second Indiana; fourth, Fifty-second Ohio. These disposi- tions were made in an open field little more than one-half mile from the works to be stormed. The Second Brigade was formed on the right, and General Harker's brigade, Fourth Corps, on the left. At a few minutes before 9 the command, "Forward!" was given, and responded to by the brave men of the brigade with the will and de- termination to succeed where success is possible. The movement began at quick time, and continued in this for nearly one-third the distance, when it was changed to double-quick. The lines moved with marked precision until they reached the foot of an abrupt hill, where they encountered a marshy creek lined on either side with shrubs and thickly matted vines. The command relieved itself as rapidly and orderly as possible from this confusion, and, turning its face to the enemy, rushed forward across an open field extending to within fifteen rods of the point of attack; here it entered a skirt of light timber, and from this point also commenced an ascent of the ground. On and up the brave men rushed, with their gallant leader at their head, until some of them reached the base of the en- I ~-'- '~ ~~' - ~' T: I('" ...~": , ' -" : 777 :7 [ ~". ;~~ Ir I. . . . 'y- ... . ... CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE OCUMBERLAND. 711 emy's parapet. Nothing daunted, they struggled to scale the works. In their efforts to do this some were knocked down with stones and clubs hurled at them by the enemy. Here the gallant Colonel Mc- Cook fell, mortally wounded, while present with and cheering his men on. Shot and stoned down, completely exhausted by the length and impetuosity of the charge, the brave men reformed their lines a few steps in the rear and partially under the crest of the hill. While this was being done Col. O. F. Harmon, of the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois, left the command of the regiment to Major Lee and placed himself at the head of the brigade; but hardly did he enjoy this command five minutes, when a musket-shot from the enemy pierced his heart, and in a few moments his remains were borne from the field. Col. C. J. Dilworth then assumed command, leaving the command of the Eighty-fifth Illinois to Major Rider. After adjusting his lines to his satisfaction, he ordered works to be constructed, which was hastily done, and the front line of which did not exceed sixty yards from the enemy's strong line of works. The loss to the brigade in this bloody contest was 410 killed and wounded, nearly all of which occurred within the short space of twenty minutes. These casualties fell heaviest upon the One hun- dred and twenty-fifth Illinois and Fifty-second Ohio. By 3 p. m. of this day the men were well sheltered behind their new lines of works and were confronting the enemy as sharpshooters. At 4 o'clock of the same day, upon my request to be relieved from duty at corps headquarters, I returned to my regiment and took command of it. From this point forward in my report I am chiefly reliant for infor- mation on the notes and memoranda of Colonel Dilworth, command- ing brigade. After the confusion of the battle was over, the bri- gade was disposed thus: The Eighty-fifth Illinois on the right, connecting with the Second Brigade; the Twenty-second Indiana on the left, connecting with General Harker's brigade; the One hun- dred and twenty-fifth Illinois in the center, and the Eighty-sixth Illinois and Fifty-second Ohio in reserve, the lines remaining the same until the morning of the 28th, when the One hundred and twenty-fifth was relieved by the Eighty-sixth Illinois; that in turn was relieved on the morning of the 29th by the Fifty-second Ohio. On this day a cessation of hostilities was effected and arrangements made under flag of truce by which the dead between the lines were removed or buried. On the 30th a new line of works was con- structed within from five to seven rods of the enemy's line. From this position our sharpshooters did excellent service, many of them using an invention called the refracting sight. The testimony in favor of the use of this sight at short range was abundant. The brigade did duty here until morning of the 3d of July, the enemy having again abandoned their works. We marched through Mari- etta; thence in a southwest course about five miles toward Atlanta. We halted and encamped here for two nights. On the morning of the 5th of July we advanced again about five miles toward the railroad bridge over the Chattahoochee River. Upon our arrival within about three miles of the bridge we came up with the enemy's skirmishers. The Third Brigade was put in position in a heavy wood, connecting on the left with the Second Brigade. As soon as lines were formed I was ordered forward, with the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illi- nois as skirmishers. The line was at once established and waited for support on the right, which was late in arriving. About 5 o'clock, all things being ready, the line advanced at the double-quick * .-6L~I aas Fr --" 712. THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. across open fields and charged the enemy's skirmishers intrenched in the edge of the wood on the opposite side; routing them from these, they drove them in confusion to their main line of works, our line approaching within less than 300 yards. The enemy made three unsuccessful attempts to drive our line back. As soon as it was dark the Eighty-sixth Illinois relieved the skirmish line and by morning were well intrenched. The other regiments of the brigade moved forward to the road and threw up works. The command re- mained in this position, regiments in their turn doing picket duty, until the morning of the 10th of July, when, a little before day- break, the bridge over the Chattahoochee River was discovered to be on fire, and, no enemy in our front, Colonel Dilworth was ordered to send out one regiment. He ordered out the Eighty-sixth Illinois, and went with it as far as the river, meeting with no opposition; left two companies at the river as pickets and ordered the remainder to camp. On the afternoon of this day the brigade moved on the Atlanta road and went into camp on the right and within one mile of the railroad bridge, where it remained, doing picket and guard duty, until the morning of the 18th of July, on which day we crossed the Chattahoochee on pontoon bridge at Pace's Ferry, five miles above railroad bridge. On the same day we crossed Nancy's Creek and advanced skirmishers from Twenty-second Indiana as far as Peach Tree Creek, near Howell's Mill. The brigade bivouacked for the night on the Atlanta and Pace's Ferry road. As the 19th of July was an eventful day in the history of this brigade, I choose to incorporate in this report the minutes made by Colonel Dilworth at the time: This morning I was ordered to form my lines in< rear of skirmish line and push across the Peach Tree Creek. This was done by placing the Fifty-second Ohio in advance, crossing the creek on a log and moving out across the field and on the hill. Here we found an entire brigade of rebels and a portion of another. The balance of our brigade crossed, first, Eighty-fifth Illinois, and went to the assistance of the Fifty-second Ohio on the left, and found a heavy force; next came the One hun- dred and twenty-fifth Illinois, and moved forward to the crest of the hill; next the Eighty-sixth Illinois, and formed on the left. The Twenty-second Indiana at the same time commenced crossing on our right and connected with the Fifty-second Ohio skirmishers on the right. Word was sent to General Davis for assistance. At the same time information was received that the enemy was drifting to the right. Colonel Langley, One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois, was ordered to form on the right, which he did at a double-quick, and just reached the top of the hill as the enemy was ready to attack, and, after a fire from the One hundred and twenty- fifth Illinois, the rebels were driven back from the right. That night intrench- ments were thrown up and the men remained on the ground getting in the wounded. I The brigade lost in this day's operations 245 killed, wounded, and missing. These losses fell most heavily upon the Fifty-second Ohio, Twenty-second Indiana, and Eighty-fifth Illinois. July 20, found the brigade well fortified, and about noon two sections of Captain Gardner's battery were put into position, and, with the aid of sharp- shooters from this and the Second Brigade, they succeeded in -driv- ing the enemy from his works. To-day the One hundred and tenth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Topping commanding, reported to the brigade for duty, and was put in the right in line. July 21, Col- onel Dilworth was ordered to make a reconnaissance with one regi- ment to the front. He ordered out the One hundred and twenty- fifth Illinois, and, connected with Colonel Mitchell's brigade on the left and General Morgan's on the right, moved too far to right; found rebels near Moore's house, on the Marietta and Atlanta road, CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 713 and came back to camp. July 22, no enemy in our immediate front; moved toward Atlanta to within two and a half miles of the city; heavy firing to our front and left; went into camp at night in reserve. July 23, position unchanged. July 24, relieved a regiment of Baird's division with the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois; remained in this position with a slight change of camp until the morning of the 28th of July; one regiment on outpost duty daily. July 28, in connection with the division, made a reconnaissance to Turner's Ferry; returned late at night to near our old position and went into camp. After this date our duties were various. We built sev- eral lines of works, did picket duty, and changed position toward the right frequently until August 4, when we moved to the right and front about three miles and went into position in the evening, connecting with General Baird on the left; One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois in left front line; Twenty-second Indiana in right front line; Eighty-fifth Illinois on picket. On the following morning the picket-line moved nearly three-quarters of a mile to the front and took 15 prisoners, with no loss to us. Main line moved forward, still keeping up the connection with General Baird on the left and also connecting with Colonel Mitchell on the right; took a position near the Sandtown road, One hundred and tenth Illinois on the left and One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois on the right front line. At night four companies of the Fifty-second Ohio re- lieved the Eighty-fifth Illinois pickets. August 6, brigade in same place and same position; enemy almost constantly shelling our lines. At night seventy-five men from One hundred and tenth Illinois re- lieved the Fifty-second Ohio on picket. I quote below substantially Colonel Dilworth's minutes of the operations of the brigade on the 7th of August: Received orders about 10 o'clock that the division was to swing to the left, and that the movement would commence on the left. About noon went to the lines; saw General Baird, who said he could not advance until evening. As soon as he had gone I received orders that General Morgan had commenced the movement on the right, and for me to conform my movements to Mitchell's. I then went to the right and found Colonel Mitchell had advanced. The skirmish line was advanced, and the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois was ordered forward. The Fifty- second Ohio was ordered up, also the Twenty-second Indiana; advanced and con- nected with Colonel Mitchell on the left and facing northeast. At night Eighty- sixth Illinois relieved One hundred and tenth Illinois on picket. In gaining this new and important position the brigade was ex- posed to a galling fire of musketry and artillery from the enemy's lines and with but little chance to us to successfully return he fire. The brigade took possession of and extended its lines across the Sandtown road and, as speedily as possible, erected strong fortifica- tions. The loss to the brigade in this day's operations was 42 offi- cers and men killed and wounded. Nothing of further importance than frequent changes of positions, picket duty, &c., occurred until August 20, upon which day the brigade started at daybreak and marched to the rear lines of the works of the Twenty-third Corps; lay in close column for two or three hours, when orders came to move out. The whole division moved toward the right of our line with this brigade in advance; marched rapidly to the line of the Mont- gomery railroad at Red Oak; tore up the railroad track and cut the telegraph wire in sight of the rebel cavalry; returned to camp at night after making a march of twenty-two miles, most of the time in a heavy rain. From this time forth the brigade performed its usual share of duties until August 26, when we broke up camp and rF 714 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. launched forth to contribute our remaining efforts to turn the enemy's left and destroy the Macon railroad, the last and only line of transit for his subsistence. By the last day of August it was pretty generally conceded that the enemy would tender us battle as usual on their choice of ground and within their strong fortifications. On this last-named day we marched to and encamped for the night near Turtle Swamp, on the left of the Atlanta and Jonesborough road. On the following morning, early, we left this place, marched across to and down the Rough and Ready and Jonesborough road, toward the latter-named place, to a point about one-half mile south of Flint River. Here the brigade moved to the left in an open field and formed in order of battle as follows: First line, Twenty-second Indiana on the right, seven companies of the Fifty-second Ohio on the left, One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois in the center, with three companies of the Fifty-second Ohio deployed as skirmishers; second line, Eighty-fifth, Eighty-sixth, and One hundred and tenth Illinois. About 2 p. iM. the brigade moved by the right flank across a difficult slough and reformed its lines on the crest of the hill on the other side and under a heavy fire from the enemy's artillery. From this point we discovered that the enemry were in strong force and well intrenched along the line of the Macon railroad. At about 3 p. m. the line advanced through a thick skirt of woods to an open corn- field, swinging gradually to the right as it advanced down the slope beyond, until our course was nearly south. We passed to within one-fourth mile of the enemy's line of works and engaged with skir- mishers while the main line was struggling to cross a swamp at the foot of the slope. As soon as a crossing was effected the enemy's skirmishers were vigorously attacked and driven to their main works. In this valley the first line built temporary works, which it held but a few minutes, when it again moved forward. A part of the Fifty-second Ohio, charging with the Second Brigade, aided in taking a rebel battery in our front. The Twenty-second Indiana and One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois advanced in quick time to the crest of the hill, where they encountered a line of rebel infantry con- cealed among the growing corn. These two regiments became at once hotly engaged. The contest appeared doubtful for a few minutes and might have turned finally in favor of the enemy but for the success of the Second Brigade on our left. Not one moment was lost in charging the line before these two regiments. The enemy in confusion hastily retreated to their intrenchments, but just in time to find themselves prisoners. After driving the enemy back some 600 or 800 yards to their works on the railroad and in the woods to the west of the railroad, our lines were about being reformed, when Colonel Dilworth, commanding the brigade, received a wound and was carried off the field. As soon as notified of the fact I assumed command and, as rapidly as possible, reformed the line. Going a few rods to the left and rear I met Captain Swift, brigade inspector, com- ing up with the Eighty-fifth Illinois from second line. This I put to work to turn the rebel works and make them available to us in the event of a counter-assault. Meeting with other members of the bri- gade staff I directed them to bring up the Eighty-sixth and One hun- dred and tenth Illinois as rapidly as possible and hold them in readi- ness for further orders. In the mean time I drew from their former positions the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois and Twenty- second Indiana, to give them some rest. At this juncture Colonel Mitchell represented to me that the enemy were massing in his front CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC--ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 715 with a view to an attack, and asked me to send him some assistance. Knowing the importance of holding the hill we occupied, I immedi- ately sent him five companies from the Eighty-sixth Illinois and seven from the Fifty-second Ohio. In a few minutes the other bat- talion of the Eighty-sixth Illinois also went to his assistance. This force remained with him about three-fourths of an hour and I de- pend upon Colonel Mitchell to do them justice in his report. Between the right of the Second Brigade and the left of the Fif- teenth Corps was a gap in the lines about one-half mile long. The threatening demonstrations of the enemy in front of this gap showed the importance they attached to it, and I determined to throw all my available force into and as far as possible close it up. I accordingly moved the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois to the right and front as far as the crest of the hill, putting it nearly in the same position it occupied while fighting half an hour before. I then moved the Eighty-fifth Illinois to the right and the One hundred and tenth Illinois to the left of the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois, and directed them to put out as many sharpshooters as could be made available to annoy and keep back the enemy's skirmishers, while the main line was ordered to construct works. The firing was kept up until dark. Several times the enemy attempted to advance, but were driven back to their works by the unerring aim of our guns. At dark, the Eighty-sixth Illinois and Fifty-second Ohio having re- turned from the assistance of the Second Brigade, I put the first in position on the right and directed it to fortify. The Twenty-second Indiana and Fifty-second Ohio were placed in reserve. Each regi- ment furnished pickets for its front, the entire picket-line being under the especial charge of Captain Burkhalter. These dispositions, in my opinion, rendered our position perfectly secure. At night the enemy abandoned their works, leaving their dead unburied and wounded uncared for. Our loss in this day's fight was 135 killed and wounded. The loss fell heaviest on the Twenty-second Indiana and One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois. The morning of the 2d showed naught but the wreck of a defeated enemy. We advanced about 10 o'clock to Jonesborough; went into position on the left of the railroad and town, where we remained until late in the day, Sep- tember 3, when I received orders from Major-General Davis to move the brigade to Atlanta on the following day to. guard prisoners and as escort to hospital train of the corps, &c. Arrived at this place the afternoon of September 4 with prisoners and train; reported, pursuant to orders, to Major-General Slocum, and went into camp on the west side, where the troops have remained doing no duty since. In this review of the history of the Third Brigade during the late campaign, I have confined myself thus far, as nearly as possible, to a recitation of facts and circumstances. Having been absent from the brigade a part of the time and afterward only with one of its regiments until the late fight at Jonesborough, it perhaps ill becomes me to make special mention of the conduct of regimental com- manders and other officers. As far as I can learn, in every engage- ment they all did their entire duty, and the casualty lists show the sanguinary character of the many conflicts in which their com- mands have been engaged. The losses of the brigade foot up, since the 3d of May last, the enormous sum of 1,081 killed, wounded, and missing, being but little less than the number now present in the 716 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. ranks for duty. The brigade met its heaviest loss in the assault on the enemy's works at Kenesaw Mountain. The number has been stated previously. Here every regiment was engaged, and when the contest was hottest the front line could be claimed by no par- ticular regiment, but was made up by the bravest men from all. At Peach Tree Creek the Fifty-second Ohio, commanded by Colonel Clancy, with skirmishers, under command of Major Holmes, did nobly in clearing the heights beyond the creek and enabling the balance of the brigade to cross and form lines free from the enemy's fire. In the same engagement the Eighty-fifth Illinois, commanded by Major Rider, advanced to within a few yards of the enemy's main line, but could not hold their position. The loss to the regi- ment was heavy, but it behaved manfully. The Twenty-second Indiana, commanded in the early part of this engagement by Major Shea, stood, unsupported, the brunt of a heavy assault, and yielded only as it was overpowered by superior numbers. Major Shea was wounded and the command fell to Captain Snodgrass, under whose charge it has been most of the time since. The conduct of this officer and his command was all that could be asked in the late battle of Jonesborough, and as truly may I say the-same of the Fifty- second Ohio, commanded by Major Holmes, in the same engage- ment, until a wound disabled him, and the command devolved upon Captain Rothacker; also the Eighty-fifth Illinois, commanded by Major Rider until disabled, when the charge of the regiment fell to Captain Griffith; the Eighty-sixth Illinois, commanded part of the time by Lieutenant-Colonel Fahnestock and part of the time by Major Thomas; the One hundred and tenth Illinois, commanded through the entire engagement by Lieutenant-Colonel Topping, and also the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois, commanded through the latter part of the engagement by Capt. George W. Cook. I wish to bear testimony to the general good conduct and bravery of the several officers above named and their respective commands. I ob- served several striking instances of noble courage and true bravery among subordinate officers and enlisted men, but space forbids that I should specially mention them here; the reports from commanders of regiments must suffice. Captains Anderson, Swift, and Burkhalter, and Lieutenant Tanner, of the brigade staff, are all known to the brigade and appreciated for their coolness and bravery in action. My heartfelt thanks are due to the three last mentioned for the eminent assistance they so cheerfully rendered me during the engagement at Jonesborough on the 1st instant. Captain Anderson, acting assistant adjutant-general of the brigade, while in the discharge of his duties, received a wound just before the command fell to me, thus depriving me of his valu- able services. Our honored dead, of whom from this brigade there are many, have all received a soldier's burial, and their scattered graves mark the meandering course of our march all the way from Resaca to Atlanta. I submit and call your attention to the appended list of casualties; also to the inclosed reports of regimental commanders. I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, JAMES W. LANGLEY, Lieut. Col. 125th Illinois, Commanding Brigade. Capt. T. WISEMAN, Assistant Adjutant- General. .. ---- r -I-- - , - , - -I - - r-- - ... ...- r :- k, " - -- . 7 7 - - _-_-_______ Ca". L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 717 List of casualties in the Third Brigade, Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, during the campaign in North Georgia, from the 3d of May to the 6th of Septem- ber, 1864. Killed. Wounded. Missing. Total. Command. Oj a O | O 85th Illinois Volunteer Infantry............. 2 40 12 83 3 50 17 173 190 22d Indiana Veteran Volunteer Infantry... 3 40 14 132 ...... 42 17 214 231 52d Ohio Volunteer Infantry ............... 2 50 13 154 1 30 16 234 250 86th Illinois Volunteer Infantry ................ 43 4 113 1 14 5 170 175 125th Illinois Volunteer Infantry ............. -7 57 4 115 2 21 13 193 206 110th Illinois Volunteer Infantry ........... ....... 26 ...... 1 28 29 Total .................................. 14 232 48 623 7 157 69 1,012 1,081 ADDENDA. List of casualties in the Third Brigade, Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, during the campaign, from May 3,1864, to September 6, 1864, Killed. Wounded. Missing. Total. Command. I 3 85th Illinois Volunteer Infatr ......... 2 40 12 87 3 50 17 117 194 86th Illinois Volunteer Infantry ............. ...... 42 4 115 1 14 5 171 176 125th Illinois Volunteer Infantry .............. 7 56 4 117 1 21 12 194 206 5sd Ohio Volunteer Infantry ................ 2 49 12 159 1 30 15 238 253 2Qd Indiana Volunteer Infantry ............. 3 40 14 132 ..... 42 17 214. 231 110th Illinois Volunteer Infantry . . 2 1 . ........... 1 28 29 Total.............................. 14 229 46 636 6 157 66 1,022 1,089 NOTE.-Discrepancies between the above recapitulation and pre- vious report result from errors discovered in regimental reports. Respectfully submitted. JAMES W. LANGLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Brigade. Capt. T. WISEMAN, Assistant Adjutant-General. No. 141. Report of Capt. James R. Griffith, Eighty-fifth 7Ilinois Infantry. HDQRS. EIGHTY-FIFTH ILLINOIS VOL. INFANTRY, Atlanta, Ga., September 7, 1864. SIR: Concerning the operations of my regiment during the recent campaign, I have the honor to submit the following report: On Tuesday morning, May 3, 1864, the regiment, under command of Col. C. J. Dilworth, marched from Lee and Gordon's Mills in the direction of Ringgold; halted at Ringgold and camped tempo- rarily. The campaign proper opened on the 9th of May, the divis- ion to which the Eighty-fifth is attached holding an important posi- ,.m _ wra8aep 718 THE ATLANTA CA3PAIG-N. [CHAP. L, tion in the line. As the army advanced, and without any important event connected with the regiment, we crossed Tunnel Hill, men- aced Buzzard Gap, and finally, by a long circuitous march, passed through Snake Creek Gap and took position before Resaca. On the 16th, Resaca evacuated, the regiment moved with the division down the road leading from Snake [Creek] Gap to Rome. Our advance was uninterrupted until we arrived in the vicinity of Rome. A battle occurred on afternoon of May 17, the contest lasting until night-fall. The enemy then retreated across the Oostenaula and burned the bridge. Early on the morning of 18th, the Eighty-fifth leading the column, we followed the retreating enemy, crossing the river as best we could by swimming, on rafts and in canoes. Our flag was hoisted upon the court-house, and rebellious Rome was again under Federal rule. The regiment lay in temporary camp at Rome till May 23; then marching through Dallas, took position about one mile beyond. By a succession of movements we were soon placed near the center of the army. In these movements our hardships were great, owing to long marches, bad roads, and wet weather. The rebel line in the Allatoona Mountains was evacuated June 5. On the 10th we pur- sued, and he was soon driven till his line rested across Kenesaw Mountain. The position assigned to my regiment was near the base of the mountain. Here the line was often subjected to a most ter- rific fire from the batteries on the summit. Our position was not changed until the 26th of June. Marching by night we moved about two miles to the right and formed in the rear as reserve. Monday morning, June 27, the necessary orders had been given and the regiment in light marching order moved to the front. Then fol- lowed the memorable battle of Kenesaw. The Eighty-fifth was as- signed the advance, and at the signal the works were scaled. With a prolonged cheer the line swept across the field in front, driving the enemy from his first works. On the summit of the hill we en- countered his main works, which proved too strong. Intrenchments were thrown up in the face of the foe. This position we held till the evacuation of Marietta on the 2d of July. In this action the gallant McCook was mortally wounded, and the command of the brigade devolving upon Colonel Dilworth, Maj. R. G. Rider was left in command of the regiment. Pursuit commenced July 3; the enemy was overtaken on the 4th. July 5, he continued his retreat and we followed. July 9, he again retired from our front, crossed Chattahoochee, and burned the bridge. Marching up the river we crossed July 18, and were assigned a position near the right. Ad- vancing on the 19th, my regiment was supporting the skirmish line; crossed Peach [Tree] Creek about 4 p. m. The hill in front was held by the enemy. My regiment advanced, following the skirmishers; passed the summit of the hill and a small field beyond it. Suddenly a destructive fire was poured into our ranks from the right, and the enemy were soon discovered on our right flank in great numbers. We fell back to the brow of the hill under a terrible cross-fire and waited for support. The enemy evacuated this line night of July 20, and we followed to the defenses around Atlanta. From July 20 to August 5 very little fighting occurred. We were often moved and always to the right, sometimes advancing the lines and build- ing new works, sometimes occupying works vacated by other troops. On the 5th day of August my regiment was deployed as skirmishers; an advance was ordered; we encountered a heavy line of skirmish- ers strongly intrenched. We charged them, took the works and CHAP. L.] REPORTS ETC.---ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 719 many prisoners. Events to August 26 are unimportant. At 4 a. m. the 27th we evacuated our line of works, moving in a southerly direction. August 28, we continued our march, crossing the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad. 30th and 31st were. spent in marching and countermarching. Thursday morning, September 1, we con- tinued our march toward the Macon railroad. Late in the day a line of intrenchments confront us beyond an extensive field. The troops move to the attack. My regiment was in the second line, hence my loss was less severe. The works were carried and the enemy compelled to evacuate Jonesborough. Late in the action Major Rider, commanding the regiment, was wounded in the head. The command then devolved upon myself. Friday morning, September 2, we entered Jonesborough. September 3, my regiment, with the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois, is placed in charge of a large number of prisoners. Early Sunday, September 4, we move with the prisoners. Joining the remainder of the brigade, we are relieved as guards and placed in rear of train. Continuing the march, we enter Atlanta late in the afternoon. Report of causualties in Eighty-fifth Illinois during the cam- paign ending September 4, 1864: Commissioned officers-killed, 2; wounded, 12; missing, 3. Enlisted men-killed, 40; wounded, 83; missing, 50. Aggregate loss, 190. I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, JAS. R. GRIFFITH, Captain, Commanding Regiment. Capt. CHARLES SWIFT, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Brigade. No. 142. Report of Lieut. Col. Allen L. Fahnestock, Eighty-sixth Illinois Inf antry. HDQRS. EIGHTY-SIXTH ILLINOIS VOL. INFANTRY, Atlanta, Ga., September 7, 1864. CAPTAIN: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Eighty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry in the great Georgia campaign, from the time it marched from Lee and Gordon's Mills, May 3, 1864, to the time it arrived in the city of At- lanta, Ga., September 4, 1864: Early on the morning of the 3d of May, pursuant to orders, I marched my regiment with the brigade to Ringgold, Ga., joining the division at this place. Here I encamped and remained until the 5th of May, when, with the brigade (Col. Dan. McCook com- manding), I moved my regiment two miles south of Ringgold and encamped near - Church. On the evening of the 6th of May I received orders to be ready to move at daylight. Accordingly, at the appointed time, on the morning of the 7th of May, I moved my regiment with the brigade toward Tunnel Hill. We had moved- but a few miles when our skirmishers, Fifty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry (Lieutenant-Colonel Clancy commanding), my regiment supporting it, caine in contact with the enemy. I was ordered by Colonel McCook to march my regiment in line of battle, my left 720 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L.' resting on the road. In this order I moved forward through a skirt of woods into an open field; the enemy opened with artillery, but fortunately did no damage. The army was detained but a short time. I was ordered to march by the flank. I marched the regi- ment on the main road south of Tunnel Hill about one mile, and then went into position on the right of the road, my left joining the One hundred and twenty-fifty Illinois (Colonel Harmon), and my right the Seventy-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, of the First Di- vision, Fourteenth Army Corps. I remained in this position until the morning of the 8th of May, when the whole brigade advanced in front of Buzzard Roost. No change of position was made till the 9th instant, when, with the brigade, I was ordered to move my reg- iment about one mile to the left to support the First Brigade (Gen- eral Morgan), one or two regiments of which were deployed as skirmishers. Nothing unusual transpired until the 10th of May, when 2 enlisted men were wounded by sharpshooters. In the even- ing the Third Brigade (Col. Dan. McCook) relieved the First Bri- gade (General Morgan), my regiment supporting the skirmishers. Nothing unusual occurred except an incessant fire kept up by the skirmishers on both sides, doing, however, very little damage on our side. On the evening of the 11th of May the brigade was relieved by a brigade of Major-General Stanley's division, of the Fourth Corps (Major-General Howard). I moved my regiment, with the brigade, to the rear and encamped for the night. On the morning of May 12 our connection with Buzzard Roost was severed. A large portion of the army moved to the right through Snake Creek Gap, continuing the march till 3 a. m. of the 13th of May, when we lay down and rested for a few hours. I was ordered to move with the brigade about one mile, where we halted, closed in mass, in which position we remained unitil evening, when the brigade moved to the left of Resaca, Ga., striking the Dalton road and bivouacking for the night. May 14, I moved with the brigade for the front, and took a position in a field, where I remained closed in mass till about 3 p. m., when the brigade formed in line of battle, under heavy ar- tillery fire, on the right of the Twenty-third Corps, my regiment on the right of the Fifty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry (Lieutenant- Colonel Clancy) and on the left of the Eighty-fifth Illinois (Colonel Dilworth). The brigade remained in this position till night and then moved to the right about a half mile, on a hill, and fortified. Nothing unusual transpired until the 15th, 4 men of my regiment vvere wounded by sharpshooters, whose bullets kept whizzing over our heads continually. In the evening my regiment relieved the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois (Colonel Harmon) on the skir- mish line; about midnight the enemy made an attack (or feint, rather) to cover their retreat. On the morning of the 16th their works were evacuated, the whole army was put in motion, and, with the old flag in the breeze, moved triumphantly over the country won from the enemy. I marched my regiment, with the brigade, through Resaca, thence to Snake Creek Gap, and thence toward Rome, Ga. . May 17, marched to within two miles of Rome, where we met the enemy in force. I formed my regiment in line of battle, the Twenty- second Indiana (Lieutenant-Colonel Wiles) on my left, and balance of brigade in support. In this position we advanced; we soon found the enemy, and a brisk fight ensued. The enemy was routed, and victory was ours. My regiment in this engagement lost 6 men killed and 11 wounded. The loss was light in comparison to the work done. On the following day I marched my regiment with the CHAP. L.] B RPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 721 brigade triumphantly into the city of Rome. To the valor of the Eighty-sixth Illinois belongs a large share of the honor of having wrested from the enemy a very important military point. At Rome. I remained encamped with the brigade until May 24, when the whole brigade resumed its march southward toward Dallas, Ga., where it arrived May 26. From this date to June 15 nothing transpired that would be of any importance in this report. With the exception of changing position, relieving and being relieved on the sirkmish line and following up the enemy, who in the mean time had fallen back .a short distance, nothing occurred. On the 15th of June six com- panies of my regiment were deployed as skirmishers, and in advanc- ing the lines 2 men were wounded. On the 16th of June I had 2 more men wounded on the skirmish line. Nothing very inipor- tant occurred until June 19. The rebels fell back to Kenesaw Moun- tain, as usual. Our brigade followed them up. On the 21st and 22d of June six companies of my regiment were deployed as skirmishers; I enlisted man was killed and 2 wounded; also, I man was wounded in quarters on the 22d by a shell. On the 25th of June I moved with the brigade to the right about three miles and remained in camp until the 27th of June. Early on this morning I received orders to be ready to move at sunrise, leav- ing camp and garrison equipage behind. A charge on the rebel center had been ordered. At about 8 a. m. our gallant and brave col- onel (Dan. McCook) formed his brigade, my regiment in the second line. The signal guns soon pealed forth their thunder, and in a mo- ment thousands of brave soldiers stood ready to advance on the traitorous foe. The charge was gallantly led, but the works proved too strong to be carried. In this charge my regiment lost 4 commis- sioned officers wounded (Capts. Frank Hitchcock, Company D; Edward Vanantwerp, Company E (since dead); Lieut. Samuel T. Rogers (A), and Lieut. and Adjt. L. J. Dawdy, wounded and cap- tured), 27 enlisted men killed, 56 wounded, and 11 captured, all wounded except 3. But notwithstanding the rebel works were not carried, the charging column was not repulsed, for it maintained the position gained and fortified from twenty -five to sixty yards from the rebel works. My regiment, with the brigade, remained within twenty-five yards of the rebel works, keeping up an incessant fire until they fell back, on the night of July 2. During the six days we lay so close to the rebel works my regiment lost additional 2 enlisted men killed and 8 wounded. My regimeht again moved on with the victorious army after the retreating foe until July 10. He had retreated across the Chattahoochee River. Three companies were deployed as skirmishers in pursuing the enemy on the 10th ; 1 enlisted man was wounded. I remained with the brigade on the north side of the Chattahoochee River doing -picket and other duties till the 18th, when we moved to the south side of the river to within about one mile of Peach Tree Creek. On the 19th of July my regiment took part in a brisk engagement on Peach Tree Creek, by which we gained a very important position. Casualties, I commissioned officer wounded (Lieut. William D. Faulkner, Company D), 4 enlisted men killed and 5 wounded. On the 22d, the rebels having again re- treated the army followed them up in front of Atlanta. From this date until the 28th the regiment was engaged in nothing except the usual routine of a campaign, such as picketing, &c. On July 28 it took part with the division in an important recon- naissance on the extreme right of our line, my regiment having four 46 R--VQL XXXVIIi, PT I 722 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. companies deployed as skirmishers. Nothing unusual transpired -ntil August 5, when again my regiment took part in advancing the lines, meeting with but little resistance. Nothing worthy of note occurred till August 20, when I moved with the brigade around the extreme right of the Twenty-third Corps to the Montgomery railroad, cutting both railroad and telegraph. I returned again with the brigade in the evening and remained in camp till the 27th of August. The casualties of the regiment from the 22d of July to this date were 8 enlisted men wounded. On the 27th of August I received orders to move my regiment. The whole army apparently was in motion. We kept moving on the right, nothing important transpiring to my regiment until Septefmber 1. Early this morning I received orders to move with the brigade to the left. We crossed a valley and the main road from JonesboroughI to Atlanta.. Here we took the direction of Jones- borough until, in a mile and a half of the town, the order was to charge the rebels. My regiment formed the second line. The column moved forward, under a galling fire of musketry and artil- lery, three-quarters of a mile, but with unwavering steps moved forward, taking the enemy's works and many prisoners. The loss of the regiment in this brilliant victory is 2 men killed and 13 wounded. I remained in my position (fortified) till next morning, and then was ordered to move to Jonesborough. On the evening of the 3d the brigade started back to Atlanta, with 1,600 prisoners. On the 4th my regiment, with the brigade, arrived safely in Atlanta with the prisoners. Thus ended most brilliantly a four months' campaign. Almost every day during the whole campaign the regiment has been under fire. For the officers and men of this regiment I must say they have done nobly, and behaved themselves worthy of the great cause in which they are engaged. Recapitulation of casualties: Commissioned officers--wounded, 4; wounded and captured, 1. Enlisted men-killed, 43; wounded, 113; missing, 14. Aggregate loss, 175. ALLEN L. FAHNESTOCK, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment. Capt. CHARLES SWIFT, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 3d Brig., 2d Div., 14th Army Corps. No. 143. Revort of Lieut. Col. E. Hibbard Topping, One hundred and tenth Illinois Infantry. HDQRS. 110TH ILLINOIS INFANTRY VOLUNTEERS, Atlanta, Ga., September 6, 1864. CAPTAIN: We left McAfee's, March 13, to go to Nashville, Tenn., to guard a wagon train through to the front. Arrived at Nashville, Tenn., March 15, and there remained waiting for the train to be fitted out until May 8, when we started for the front with a train of wagons. May 9, had 1 man wounded by a runaway team. May 11, chased a party of guerrillas near Ferguson's plantation, between Shelbyville and Tullahoma, Tenn. May 26, joined the corps near Dallas, Ga. Continued with the train until June 26, when we were ordered to re- port with command to division headquarters. Since that time we were part of the time at division headquarters and part of the time with the train until July 20, when we joined the brigade. Our lines CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 723 were shelled very heavily by the rebels August 5. Very near all the regiment (about ninety men) was on the skirmish line in the ad- vance on the 7th of August. Our loss was 1 enlisted man killed, 16 enlisted men wounded, 3 of whom have since died. Was on the sec- ond line of battle in the charge on the 1st of September until near dark, when we were placed on the first line. Loss, I enlisted man killed, 1 commissioned officer and 8 enlisted men wounded, besides 1 enlisted man wounded by the explosion of a box of ammunition in the ordnance train. Total casualties-2 enlisted men killed, 1 commissioned officer and 26 enlisted men wounded. E. HIBBARD TOPPING, Lieutenant Colonel, Comdg. 110th Illinois Infty. Vols. Capt. CHARLES SWIFT, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 3d Brig., 2d Div., 14th Army Corps. No. 144. Report of Capt. George W. Cook, One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois Infantry. HEADQUARTERS 125TH ILLINOIS VOLUNTEERS, Atlanta, Ga., September 7, 1864. SIR: In compliance with orders, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by this command in the recent campaign, from its commencement, in May, until its arrival at Atlanta, on the 4th instant: In order for me to make this report nearly accurate I must depend mainly upon the notes of Col. 0. F. Harmon and Lieut. Col. James W. Langley, respectively, commanders of the regiment from the commencement of the campaign until the 1st day of the present month, when the command fell to me. Forming a part of the Third Brigade, Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, this regiment, commanded by Col. 0. F. Harmon, numbering 449 effective men, left Lee and Gordon's Mills, Ga., on the 3d day of May last, where it had been doing, in connection with the brigade commanded by Co]. Daniel McCook, outpost duty, and marched to Ringgold, where it joined the division then commanded by Brig. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis. After a day or two of rest at the last-named place the forward march was resumed and continued in until we faced the enemy before Buzzard Roost. On the road to this point we skirmished with the retreating foe at different points. At Buzzard Roost we were most of the time during several days actively engaged with the enemy's skirmishers, but lost no men. The regiment participated in the flank movement through Snake Creek Gap, which move gained Buzzard Roost. This march was long and tedious, but was borne by all cheerfully and without complaint. At Resaca we met the enemy and were engaged actively with him. The regiment occupied a temporary line of works immediately in front of and but a few hundred yards from the works of the opposing forces. Here, as in previous instances, every man did his duty, until the flight of the enemy from Resaca, on the night of the 14th [15th] of May, opened on the following morning a new field of labor. An expedition to Rome, Ga., was fitted out for our division, and on the morning of the 15th [16th] the regiment was detailed, with one section of Battery I, Second Illinois Artillery, to command and guard the division supply 724 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. and ordnance train, in rear of the marching column of the division, to that city. The regiment took no part in the fight at Rome on the 17th; arrived with its important charge on the following day. Re- mained at Rome doing various duty until the 24th day of May, when the entire division took up its line of march toward Dallas; joined the Army of the Tennessee, to which the division was temporarily attached, near the last-named place on the 26th day of May. The next encounter with the enemy was at Dallas, on the night of the 27th of May, when we were attacked by a superior force while engaged in relieving the Twenty-second Indiana, who were doing picket duty. The enemy succeeded in capturing, owing to the unavoidable unadjusted condition of the lines at the moment, 14 enlisted men and I commissioned officer, and wounding 3 others (enlisted men); but this temporary disaster was quickly, though but partially, compensated by the capture of 1 captain, 1 lieutenant, and 25 enlisted men from the enemy. On the following morning the pickets drove the enemy back with a loss of 20 killed and wounded; but 2 men wounded on our side. Until we reached Kenesaw Moun- tain, on the 27th of June, nothing worthy of note occurred, although we daily faced the foe. At Kenesaw Mountain, on the morning of the 27th of June, the regiment, in connection with the brigade, formed a part of the attacking column that was on that day hurled against the enemy's works. The One hundred and twenty-fifth Regiment was the foremost in the brigade. The conflict was short and bloody, and it is painful to record that a repulse to our forces along the entire line was the result. Never fought troops better than on that day, and attention is called to the casualties in this command alone, which were 120 in the short space of twenty min- utes, nearly one-half of which were in the list of killed; and also that the brigade rallied within sixty yards of the enemy's works, threw up intrenchments under a heavy fire, and held them until the night of July 3, when the enemy evacuated their lines and retreated toward Atlanta. In the above-mentioned engagement we lost several brave officers and men, chief among whom was the colonel of the regiment, of whom it may not be inappropriate here to remark that a braver soldier or more efficient officer in line of his peculiar duties the Army of the Union does not contain. The com- mand at this point devolved upon Lieut. Col. James W. Langley, who commanded the regiment through the engagement at the Chat- tahoochee River, July 5, and at Peach Tree Creek, on the 19th of July, in both of which it was actively engaged, and subsequently until, in the midst of the battle of Jonesborough, September 1, when Colonel Dilworth, brigade commander, was wounded and carried off the field, the command of the brigade devolved upon him (Lieutenant- Colonel Langley), and that of the regiment upon myself.. During the whole of the engagement at Jonesborough the officers and men behaved with that high courage which marks the soldier fighting in support of a good cause. The regiment, while yet under command of Lieut. Col. James W. Langley, reached the crest of the hill just in front of a rebel battery, engaged the enemy in the open field, and contributed greatly in aiding the Second Brigade, on our left, to scale the enemy's works. Here they fought with the desperation ~f men determined to win, and they did win, though not until my regi- ment had lost 1 officer and 3 men killed, 30 enlisted men wounded- some 6 or 8 of them mortally. At dark my regiment was formed in line with the Eighty-fifth, Eighty-sixth, and the One hundred and tenth Illinois, when we built a strong line of works. The troops CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 7T2 were marched to Jonesborough and put in temporary camp. The regiment and brigade was ordered to Atlanta, September 4, in charge of nearly 2,000 prisoners, captured in the Jonesborough fight, and went into camp at this place, where it now remains, and it is sincerely hoped that, if the campaign is over, it will remain until, in the opinion of the powers that be, it is needed in the field for active operations. I respectfully submit and herewith transmit a list of casualties in the command since May 3 up to the close of this cam- paign. In conclusion I would say in behalf of the officers and enlisted men of this regiment, that they, with few exceptions, most manfully and soldierly, in every engagement in which the regiment has partici- pated, stood up and faced the foe, while many fell dead on the field. It would be difficult to make special mention of names and do ample justice to all and i justice to none. A grateful country will reward them all for their noble services. The survivors of Kenesaw and subsequent battles can never for- get our patriotic dead. Colonel Harmon, Captains Fellows and Lee, and Lieutenant McLean fell at the former place, where duty called them. At Peach Tree Creek, Lieutenant Jones, of Company D, com- manding Company B, died as he had lived-a true Christian soldier. Lieutenant White, who so nobly fell at the crossing of the Sandtown road, was loved and respected by all whose good fortune it was to have his acquaintance. Again, at Jonesborough, the daring and faithful Captain Charles fell in the discharge of his immediate duty. So with Sergeant Thralls, who for more than two months had com- manded Company B: wounded in the leg during the hottest of the engagement, received his fatal blow' from a stray bullet while his wound was being dressed. My confidence in him as a company com- mander was always firm, because I knew him to be a brave man. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, GEO. W. COOK, Captain,. Commanding Regiment. Capt. CHARLES SWIFT, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 3d Brig., 2d Div., 14th Army Corps. List of casualties in the One hundred and twenty-fifth Regiment Illinois Vol- unteer Infantry from May 3 to September 6, 1864. Killed. Wounded. Missing. Date. Place of engagement. May 11.... Buzzard Roost, Ga. May 15 ......... Buzzard oosta , Ga ............. ............... ........ ........... . May15... .. Resaca, Ga .... .. .... ........................ ...... ...... ..... .. ... May31......... Dallas, Ga. ............................................. 5 14 June 27........ Kenesaw Mountain, Ga . ................. . 4 50 ...... 63 1 63 July 5 ......... Chattahoochee River .......... .............. ...... July 19 ....... Peach Tree Creek, Ga ......................... 3 1 August 5 to 12 Before Atlanta, Ga . ......................... 3 13........ September 1... Jonesborough, Ga ............................. 1 6 ...... 29 Total...................................... 7 57 4 115 2 21 Respectfully submitted. GEO. W. COOK, Captain, Commanding. 726 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. No. 145. Report of Capt. William H. Snodgrass, Twenty-second Indiana In- fantry. HDQRS. TWENTY-SECOND INDIANA VETERAN VOLS., In the Field, near Atlanta, Ga., September 7, 1864. CAPTAIN: I have the honor herewith to submit the following re- port of the part taken by the Twenty-second Regiment Indiana Vet- eran Volunteers during the campaign just closed: On the 6th of May last the regiment, in command of Lieuten- ant-Colonel Wiles, left Ringgold, Ga., and on the 7th assisted in driv- ing the enemy from Tunnel Hill. On the 9th, in skirmish at Rocky Face, had 1 man wounded. On the 10th withdrew from Rocky Face and took position at Resaca, where, on 15th, had 3 men wounded on skirmish line. May 16, enemy evacuated Resaca and Second Divis- ion marched to Rome, at which place, on 17th, had an engagement with the enemy. Lieutenant-Colonel Wiles was severely wounded in right arm, Major Shea in throat, and Adjutant Adams slightly in right arm. In addition, there were killed 11 enlisted men, 5 com- missioned officers, and 23 enlisted men wounded. On the 18th Cap- tain Taggart succeeded Colonel Wiles in command of the regiment. Occupied Rome on the 19th and remained encamped there till 24th, then marched to Dallas. Placed on skirmish line 27th; lost 3 men killed, 6 wounded, and 2 missing. June 1, marched to the left and relieved One hundred and twenty- eighth Indiana near Liberty Church. On the 5th the enemy evacu- ated their works. Remained. encamped near Acworth till June 10. On 12th Captain Taggart, in consequence of severe illness, was re- lieved and the undersigned placed in command of the regiment. On skirmish line near Big Shanty on June 14; lost 3 men wounded. On 19th took position in front of Kenesaw Mountain; had 1 man killed. On same line on 23d; had 1 man killed and 1 wounded. On night June 25 changed position to the right, and on 27th participated in assault on enemy's works near Marietta; loss, 1 commissioned officer killed and 2 wounded; enlisted men killed 11, and 33 wounded and 4 missing. Night of July 2 enemy evacuated their works and the regiment marched in pursuit passing through Marietta and taking position in front of the enemy, who again withdrew on the night of the 4th from his works, and on the 5th our division took position on the north bank of the Chattahoochee River. On the 7th of July had 1 man killed and 4 wounded. On the 12th Major Shea assumed command. Crossed the Chattahoochee on the 18th, and took position on Peach Tree Creek. 19th, skirmished with and charged the enemy, with following loss: 5 killed, 17 wounded, and 35 missing. Among the wounded was Major Shea; left arm amputated. The command devolved upon Captain Taggart. July 23, took position in front of Atlanta. 28th, marched to Kelly's Ford and returned, taking posi- tion on left of Sixteenth Corps. August 7, Captain Taggart again relieved on account of sickness. I again took command of the regiment. Same afternoon charged and took enemy's works with loss of 1 commissioned officer wounded, 4 enlisted men killed, and 13 wounded. Remaining in position till llth, then moved three miles to right, camping till 20th, when marched to the right eight miles farther and broke the Montgomery railroad, the Twenty-second Regiment in front. Marched back, reoccupied HA. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. same camp till 27th, when the army commenced moving to the Macon railroad. August 31, occupied and fortified Lick Skillet road. September 1, crossed Flint River at 12 m. and took position in front of enemy near Jonesborough. In afternoon participated in charge with Third Brigade; took rebel works, routing enemy, cap- turing a number of pieces of artillery and several hundred prisoners. The Twenty-second lost in this battle 2 commissioned officers killed, 4 wounded; 3 enlisted men killed, 29 wounded, and 1 missing. On the 3d and 4th our brigade returned, in charge of 1,700 prisoners, to Atlanta, which had been occupied by our forces, the enemy surren- dering the place on the 2d of September. In closing this report I must say, with few exceptions, that the officers and men of the Twenty-second have endured the dangers and harpships of this long campaign with that bravery, fortitude, and patience only possessed by heroes and veterans. The losses in killed and wounded attest their bravery and show how gallantly they have acquitted themselves on the various fields of glory. Before recapitu- lating the aggregate losses I must make honorable mention of the following officers, who, at the times and places specified, behaved with commendable coolness, gallantry, and bravery: At Kenesaw Mountain, June 27, Capt. W. Powers, Adjutant Adams, First Lieutenants Roberts, Marshall, Graves, Gooding, and Ireland; Sec- ond Lieutenants Mayfield, Riggs, Lindson, and Moser. In front of Atlanta, August 7, First Lieutenants Geooding, Graves, and Ireland; Second Lieutenants Riggs, Lindson, Runyan, and Moser. At Jones- borough, September 1, Captain Powers, First Lieutenants Gooding, Ireland; Second Lieutenants Riggs, Moser, Lindson, and Runyan, the latter two of whom were killed while bravely leading their men on to victory. The following enlisted men, for their bravery and heroic conduct, deserve commendation and are recommended for promotion: Sergt. Maj. Elias Downing, Sergts. John Caton, McCune, and Rial, Com- pany F; William H. Golden, B; Sergts. Thomas Jones, H; Tolbert and Corporal Jordan, E. List of casualties: Commissioned officers-killed, 3; wounded, 14; total, 17. Enlisted men-killed, 40; wounded, 132; missing, 42; total, 214. Aggregate loss, 231. Respectfully submitted. W. H. SNODGRASS, Captain, Commanding Regiment. [Capt. CHARLES SWIFT.] No. 146. Report of Maj]. James T. Holmes, Fifty-second Ohio Infantry. HDQRS. FIFTY-SECOND OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, Atlanta, Ga., September 7, 1864. SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by this command in the campaign now closing: On the morning of May 3 this regiment, moving with the bri- gade, left Lee and Gordon's Mills, Ga., and in the evening en- camped at Ringgold, Ga. It remained near this point until the morning of the 7th, when, at daylight, with Companies A, B, and F as skirmishers, it headed the column moving by the direct road upon Tunnel Hill, then held by the enemy. The skirmishers struck 728 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. the enemy's vedettes at the distance of two miles from Ringgold, and a desultory firing was kept up until within a mile of Tunnel Hill, when a brisk skirmish took place, the enemy's force consisting of 50 to 100 cavalry or mounted infantry. Companies G and H were sent to effect a junction with the skirmish line moving in ad- vance of a column that was following a road on our left. The junc- tion was effected. I was directed by General Davis in person to move my skirmish line by the right flank one-half mile and skir- mish the woods toward the point where the rebel battery had opened. The battery had been planted on the road leading through the gap to the right toward Buzzard Roost and near the gap. When the line reached the point I received an order from Colonel McCook to recall the skirmishers, and immediately received one from General Davis to skirmish over the ridge. Before reaching the crest a staff officer from General Palmer directed the line re- called. The result proved dangerous to General Davis and staff, as, riding a short distance beyond where the skirmish line had halted, they were fired upon by a squad of the enemy concealed near by. The regiment remained quartered near the church in Tunnel Hill until the evening of the 9th, when it joined the brigade in front of Buzzard Roost. At dark on the 10th seven companies, under com- mand of Lieut. Col. C. W. Clancy, relieved the skirmishers of our First Brigade on Rocky Face; the three remaining lay with the bri- gade in reserve. From daylight until dark of the 11th the fire of the enemy was galling upon the skirmishers. At night of the llth the line was relieved and encamped two miles in rear. Taking up the line of march with the brigade on the morning of the 12th, about daylight of the 13th the regiment reached the mouth of Snake Creek Gap. In the evening, after marching in a zigzag direction for a distance of four or five miles, a position about a mile from the defenses of Resaca was taken up. Early on the morning of the 14th the movement upon the works of the enemy began; during the day the regiment, with the brigade, was supporting the forces engaged in an assault upon the works; at night moved to a ridge a short distance to the right and fortified. The regiment occupied this position until the morning of the 16th, when it moved to the mouth of Snake Creek Gap, at which point knapsacks had been left, and from thence to Rome, at.which place it moved in support of the Eighty-sixth Illinois and Twenty-second Indiana during the brief engagement on the evening of the 17th. P. m. of the 18th crossed the Oostenaula and fortified in the suburbs of the city against an anticipated cavalry attack. Encamping in the suburbs the regi- ment rested until the morning of the 24th at 6 o'clock, when it marched with the brigade toward Dallas, at which place position in line was taken the morning of the 27th. On the night of the 29th the regiment was ordered some distance to the rear and left of the line held by the brigade, to cover an opening between two brigades. Temporary fortifications were thrown up and at daylight the fol- lowing morning the regiment returned to the line of the brigade. P. m. of the 30th dropped back a mile toward Dallas behind tem- porary works. June 1, early in the forenoon, the regiment with the brigade marched to the left and reached its position between Dallas and Acworth in the night, relieving a regiment of the Twenty-third Corps upon the line. From this position constant skirmishing with the enemy from the main works was kept up until the morning of the 4th, when the command was moved two or three miles to the CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.--ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 729 left into works of the Twentieth Corps. Morning of the 6th moved to the left and encamped near Acworth. At 8 a. m. of June 10 moved toward Kenesaw Mountain. During the gradual approaches to the mountain of the succeeding ten days the regiment threw up intrenchments three times, and Companies I, C, H, and E advanced the skirmish line on the 13th. Companies A, B, F, and G supported the skirmish line of the Eighty-sixth Illinois on the 16th, and ad- vanced the skirmish line on the 18th. On the 21st the regiment threw up works under the mountain. On the 2.d the regiment was ordered to support the skirmish line in a contemplated advance to the top of Kenesaw. The advance was not made, and the regiment returned on the 24th. Companies D, I, and C on the skirmish line at the foot of the mountain. Relieved at dusk by the Seventieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, when the regiment marched two miles to the right and encamped in rear of the right of the Fourth Corps. June 27, at 7 a. m. the regiment formed the rear line of the bri- gade, then thrown in column of regiments for an assault upon the enemy's works. The assault was made at 8 a. m., and notwith- standing the withering fire from the enemy's guns and the failure to carry the works, together with the efforts of frightened and wounded men to break through the ranks, the regiment preserved its unity and alignment within thirty yards of the works, when ordered to occupy and intrench a second line about thirty yards in rear of the position it held when the assault ended. The posi- tion was intrenched immediately, although the troops were con- stantly harassed by sharpshooters from the enemy's works. July 3, the enemy having evacuated their works the night pre- vious, the regiment moved through Marietta and encamped about four miles south-southeast. At dusk on the 4th we occupied works thrown up in front of the enemy by the First Brigade. On the 5th followed the enemy to their last position northwest of the Chatta- hoochee River and threw up earth-works. On the 8th the regiment was detailed as skirmishers. On the 9th relieved from the skirmish line. On the 10th the regiment encamped near the Chattahoochee, where it remained until the morning of the 18th; crossed the Chat- tahoochee above Nancy's Creek; crossed Nancy's Creek at noon without opposition, and night intrenched on the northern bank of Peach Tree Creek. In the afternoon of the 19th the regiment, under the personal direction of Colonel Dilworth, commanding bri- gade, effected the crossing of Peach Tree, and only sheltered from the fire of the enemy by a light strip of undergrowth on each side of the stream. As soon as the entire regiment was on the south side of the creek, Companies A, F, H, B, and K were deployed as skirmish- ers, as much as possible under cover of the bushes, with instructions to halt when the ridge and houses, from 300 to 500 yards in front, should be carried. At the command the five companies leaped from cover, and, as quickly as men could pass over the distance, regard- less of the fire from twice their number of guns, carried the crest with a shout at the success. Lieutenant-Colonel Clancy immediately double-quicked the reserve to the right and rear of the skirmish line on the crest, and began a light work of rails for the purpose of shel- tering the reserve. Company A, by his order, was withdrawn from the skirmish line, and Companies F, E, and G sent forward on the right. Both our flanks were without support at this moment. Orders to move the skirmish line forward were sent by the colonel commanding brigade, and as the movement began it was met by the enemy in force, charging back upon the line. The weight of mrlIT.~FpiY_-Nf~C am e--s b B Ir~L~~,arraa~ 730 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHA. L. their first assault struck the center and left of the line, but did not succeed in dislodging us from the houses and the crest, although our loss, in proportion to the number engaged, was severe in killed, wounded, and missing. The second assault, made by at least six rebel regiments, struck and almost completely enveloped the right of the skirmish line and the reserve. The line was driven to the reserve, and the reserve, by the flank fire and the weight of num- bers, was forced back to the main line, then formed about fifteen paces in the rear of the reserve. At this moment Lieut. Col. C. W. Clancy, the commanding officer of this regiment from the 1st of May to the 19th of July, was taken prisoner, and with him the records from which this report for the period mentioned would otherwise have been made were lost. The ridge was held and the enemy repulsed. On the 20th the regiment intrenched in rear of the Eighty-sixth and One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois. On the 22d encamped within two miles of Atlanta, on the right of the Mari- etta road. On the 28th the regiment formed the rear guard of a reconnaissance by the division, in rear of the right flank of the Army of the Tennessee. 29th, formed part of the second line, ad- vancing the right flank of the army. At dusk the regiment was ordered on the skirmish line. On the 30th relieved from skirmish line by Thirtieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and moved with the brigade division distance to the right. On the 31st moved on a reconnaissance with the brigade to the right and returned. Mov- ing with the brigade toward the right on the afternoon of the 4th and the morning of the 5th, the regiment threw up intrenchments, under a heavy fire of shells, about 10 a. m. At dusk Companies E, K, G, and B were detailed for skirmish line, and were re- lieved on the following evening. On the 7th the main line was advanced in full view of the enemy's works and batteries, the latter playing, on the troops freely. The position assigned the regiment at this point exposed it to a direct and enfilading fire from both musketry and artillery. Heavy traverses were thrown up and just completed by the night of the 12th, when a change of position was ordered. It had been impossible to work in daylight, hence the length of time required to build such works by men fatigued and harassed, fighting from dawn till eve each day. On the morning of the 13th the regiment was assigned a fortified position on the southern branch of Utoy Creek, and remained in it until 2.30 a. m. of the 19th, Companies A, F, D, and I picketing twenty-four hours mean time. On the 19th moved some two miles toward Sandtown; countermarched, and crossing the branch of Utoy, lay in rear of a portion of the Twenty-third Corps until night, when we returned to camp. On the 20th marched at daylight with the brigade; reached the Montgomery railroad, six miles below East Point, about mid- day. The regiment was ordered to support the Twenty-second Indi- ana Volunteers while engaged in destroying the track. At dark reached the camp on Utoy without the loss of a man. On the 23d Companies I, C, H, and E ordered on picket, and relieved on the 24th. On the 27th, at daylight, moved out of our works, crossed Utoy, and at noon took up position facing north-northeast. On the 28th, moving with the brigade, crossed the Montgomery railroad, and encamped. On the 30th moved to the right front, near Rough and Ready, and fortified. On the 31st, in the afternoon, moved to the front a short distance; faced about and moved to the right, in the direction of heavy firing; encamped near the left of the Army of the Tennessee. CHAP. L.1 REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 731 September 1, moved with the brigade toward Jonesborough, pass- ing through the works of the Seventeenth Corps, and halting. The :regiment was ordered to skirmish over a hill in front. The position was occupied by the skirmish Companies A, F, and D, with but little resistance. The remaining seven companies occupied the front line upon the left of the brigade, when formed for the movement upon the enemy's works, and continued to occupy that position in the movement until both the works and guns of the enemy were cap- tured, although men from many regiments of the division became mingled while engaged near the captured works and guns. By one of the casualties of battle the command of the regiment devolved upon Capt. Samuel Rothacker soon after the final charge began, and remained with him until the morning of the 2d. On the 2d the regi- ment encamped at Jonesborough. 3d, at 6 p. m. moved to division hospital and encamped for the night. On the 4th the regiment was ordered in advance of the train by way of Rough and Ready to At- lanta, Ga., which place was reached in the evening. The regiment was detailed as a part of the guard over a brigade of prisoners from the suburbs to the military prison, and on the following morning it was directed to its present camp. I respectfully submit and herewith transmit a list of casualties in the command since May 3. In the body of my report I have omitted any regular allusion to the casualties in the different actions. The accompanying list I hope will be sufficiently explicit. Of the officers whom we shall see no more, I can only say they flinched from no known duty, dying like they were, true men and true soldiers. Capt. S. M. Neighbor was mortally wounded at Ken- esaw; also Lieuts. Ira H. Pool and D. F. Miser. Capt. P. C. Schneider and Lieut. J. H. Donaldson were killed on the field at Peach Tree. Were I to begin making special mention of the worthy it would be difficult to avoid injustice to some. Alike to officers and men, I can say they did their duty in action. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. T. HOLMES, Major, Commanding Regiment. Capt. CHARLES SWIFT, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 3d Brig., 2d Div., 14th Army Corps. List of casualties in the Fifty-second Regiment Ohio infantry Volunteers from May 3, 1864, to September 6, 1864. Killed. Wounded. Missing. Date. Place of engagement. o o May 11 ........ Buzzard Roost, Ga ......... ...... ...... ...... 9 . . ...... May 15 ........ Resaca, Ga . .............. 2 1 6 ........ May 31 ........ Dallas, Ga .......... .......... ...... 1 . .... 4 ...... ... June 27........ Kenesaw Mountain, Ga ........ ............. 22 ...... 76 3 July 19 ......... Peach Tree Creek, Ga . ........................ 2 17 3 35 1 25 August 5 to 12. Before Atlanta, Ga ............................ 5 1 8 2... September 1... Jonesborough, Ga ............................. 3 1 16 ............ Total ............... 2 51 13 154 1 30 Respectfully submitted. J. T. HOLMES, Major, Commanding Regiment. 732 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. ICAP. L. No. 147. Reports of Brig. Gen. Absalom Baird, U. S. Army, commanding Third Division. HEADQUARTERS U. . FORCES, Ringgold, Ga., May 2, 1864. GENERAL: In obedience to your orders I sent General Kilpatrick out this morning upon the Tunnel Hill road. I likewise sent Col- onel Van Derveer with his brigade to support him. Before starting I posted General Turchin in front of the gap, with a portion of the Third Brigade, and directing him to take charge of matters here, accompanied the column myself. General Kilpatrick drove the out- posts of the enemy without great opposition from their ordinary positions to Tunnel Hill, and he himself immediately reached the crest this side of the village, at Smith's house, which is almost within musket range of the town. From this point he sent back word that the enemy had deployed himself in large force beyond the village and on Tunnel Hill ridge, and asked for the assistance of the in- fantry, as he might otherwise find it difficult to withdraw his skir- mishers, some of whom were dismounted men. I immediately went forward with four regiments, having found it necessary to post three out of the brigade to guard important avenues of approach upon our rear and flanks. Arriving at Smith's house I saw the lines of rebel troops stretching along the ridge for a long distance, and a line in the low ground at its base. Some of these men were on foot, but I suppose them to have been dismounted cavalry. A battery was likewise reported by the signal officer as visible on the ridge. I was informed by the family of my guide, Terrell, that no change had taken place in the rebel force about Tunnel Hill, and that none was known to have taken place at Dalton; on the contrary, that the enemy had been strengthening his works at Buzzard Roost by dam- ming up the creek and otherwise, and apparently intended to stand there. I was satisfied from what I saw that no material portion of any of the enemy's force had been withdrawn, and not feeling authorized to attack so strong a position with four regiments of in- fantry, I determined to withdraw. The cavalry being at the time collected in masses in the open field, within range of artillery, I has- tened to send it to the rear and back to camp, posting a line of in- fantry in its place. This done, I soon after withdrew with but lit- tle molestation. A small party followed my rear guard and ex- changed shots with it, but without effect, and the reconnaissance was successfully terminated. I had in all about 10men wounded; 2, I am told, mortally. The loss of the enemy is not known, but we learned that after the previous reconnaissance 15 wounded rebels were taken to Terrell's house. I was also told that the railroad is still running to Tunnel Hill. I must commend to the major-general commanding the fine sol- dierly qualities displayed by both General Kilpatrick and Colonel Van Derveer in my two reconnaissances. Most respectfully, your obedient servant, A. BAIRD, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Brig. Gen. W. D. WHIPPLE, A. A. G. and Chief of Staff, Dept. of the Cumberland. Command. Officers. Men. Total. First Brigade, Brig. Gen. J. B. Turchin commanding: 11th Ohio Volunteers, Lieut. Col. Ogden Street ..................... 15 263 278 17th Ohio Volunteers, Col. Durbin Ward ............ .............. 22 569 571 31st Ohio Volunteers, Col. M. B. Walker ............................ 26 583 609 89th Ohio Volunteers, Maj. J. H. Jolly ............................. 10 211 221 92d Ohio Volunteers, Col. B. D. Fearing ............................ 13 310 323 82d Indiana Volunteers, Col. M. C. Hunter ...... ........... 17 252 269 19th Illinois Volunteers, Lieut. Col. A. W. Raffen ..... ............ 15 239 254 24th Illinois Volunteers, Capt. A. Mauff ........................... 14 211 225 o ~ ~ ~ ~ . Total .............................................................. Second Brigade, Col. F. Van Derveer, 35th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, commanding: 2d Minnesota Volunteers, Col. J. George ........................ 35th Ohio Volunteers, Maj. J. L. Budd.... ........ .... ......... 9th Ohio Volunteers, Col. G. Kammerling ......................... 87th Indiana Volunteers, Col. N. Gleason ..... ................... 105th Ohio Volunteers, Lieut. Col. G. T. Perkins..................... 101st Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. Thomas Doan................ 75th Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. William O'Brien ............. Total ...... ............................................. Third Brigade, Col. G. P. Este, 14th Ohio Volunteers, commanding: 10th Kentucky Volunteers, Col. W. H. Hays ........................ 10th Indiana Volunteers, ] ieut. Col. M. B. Taylor ................ 14th Ohio Volunteers, Maj. J. W, Wilson ........................... CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 733 HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS, Jonesborough, Ga., September 7, 1864. CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part performed by this division in the campaign which began with the movement of the army from Chattanooga, Tenn., in May last, and terminated with the capture of Atlanta, Ga., on the 1st instant: On the 22d of February this division marched from Chattanooga, together with the other two divisions of the corps, to Tunnel Hill and Buzzard Roost Gap, for the purpose of making a reconnaissance of the enemy's position in front of Dalton, and having ascertained by feeling him closely for two days that his army was still there in force, strongly posted and fortified, we withdrew upon the night of the 26th to Ringgold, where this division took post, the re- mainder of the troops being removed to other points. From Feb- ruary until May the division continued to occupy that place as the extreme advance post of the army. Our pickets and those of the enemy were always in close proximity, and affairs of minor impor- tance between them were of constant occurrence. On two occasions, reconnoitering parties of large force were sent as far as Tunnel Hill, both of which were highly successful, and chiefly useful in inspir- ing our cavalry with greater confidence in their superiority over that of the enemy. In each of these expeditions Brigadier-General Kilpatrick, whose division of cavalry was placed under my charge, commanded the cavalry, and Col. F. Van Derveer, of the Thirty- fifth Ohio, an infantry brigade. Both of these officers displayed on these occasions the high soldierly qualities for which they are known, energy and boldness, guided by the coolest judgment. During the interval from the 1st to the 6th of May the divisions and corps of the Army of the Cumberland were concentrated about Ringgold, the Army of the Ohio taking a position on our left, and the Army of the Tennessee a line of march passing to our right. My division was at that time constituted as follows: INFANTRY. 132 28,618 2,750. 22 380 402 15 277 282 20 380 400 17 316 333 15 337 352 19 359 378 23 408 431 131 2, 457 2,588 'I 23 343 368 32 653 685 36 498 518 734 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHA. L. INFANTRY-Continued. Command. Officers. Men. Total. Third Brigade, Col. G. P. Este, 14th Ohio Volunteers, comdg.-Continued. 18th Kentucky Volunteers, Lieut. Col. H. K. Milward .............. 28 454 482 38th Ohio Volunteers, Col. W. A. Choate ............................ 25 651 676 74th Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. M. Baker ...................... 15 380 395 Total ................................... .......................... 143 2,979 3,122 Total infantry .................... .... ............................ 406 8,05 8, 460 ARTILLERY. Command. Officers. Men. Total. Horses. Guns. 7th Indiana Battery, First Lieut. O. H. Morgan... 4 157 161 100 6 19th Indiana Battery, First Lieut. W. P. Stackhouse. 3 144 147 118 6 Total artillery ................................ 7 301 308 218 12 NARRATIVE. May 7, leaving Colonel Este's brigade (the Third) in garrison at Ringgold, the remainder of the division marched on the morning of the 7th to Tunnel Hill. The other two divisions of the corps being in advance, had already brushed away with their advanced guards the pickets of the enemy at that place, and had gone into position when we arrived. This division went into line on the right a little to the south of the village, where it remained during the night. On the morning of the 8th the division moved south three miles upon the Villanow road, so as to form a connection with the corps of Major-General Hooker and at the same time to cover the right flank of Brigadier-General Johnson, who was swinging forward onto the south end of Tunnel Hill ridge. In the afternoon we crossed that ridge and moved up in support of Brigadier-Generals Johnson and Davis, then in front of Buzzard Roost Gap. May 9, 10, and 11, during these days we remained in our position in reserve, no active operations being carried on in our front. May 12, my division, in advance of the corps, marched at daybreak to- ward the right, to the support of Major-General McPherson, who had passed his army through Snake Creek Gap and had taken position in Sugar Valley, threatening Resaca. Being detained by the Twentieth Corps in advance of me, I did not get into position until after dark. The other divisions of the Fourteenth Corps were behind me, and they were followed by the Twenty-third Corps. May 13, moved forward at noon along with the remainder of the army, and about dark got into position on the left of Brigadier-General John- son's division, upon a series of steep and difficult hills, covered with a dense wood and undergrowth. Major-General Schofield was some- where on my left and rear, but not connecting. Brigadier-General Johnson's skirmishers became engaged with those of the enemy, but mine did not come in contact with them. RESACA. May 14, having received orders during the night from the major- general commanding the corps to swing forward my entire line along CRAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 735 with that of Brigadier-General Johnson, his right being taken as the pivot, and to push on until the enemy was encountered, I put my troops in motion at daybreak. Colonel Van Derveer was on my right, formed in two lines, and Brigadier-General Turchin on the left, formed in the same manner. My right had moved some three- fourths of a mile, and the direction of our line was about due north and south, facing east, when I received another order from the same source, informing me that Major-General Schofield, whose corps was then in line half, a mile to my rear, with his right overlapping nearly the whole of my left brigade, was about to advance and charge the enemy's works, and directing me to move forward with him and assault at the same time. I had not previously known that the enemy had works in our vicinity, nor was I then informed as to their position, their character, or the manner in which the attack was to be made. There was, of course, no time for a reconnaissance by me without neglecting to advance along with Major-General Schofield, as ordered. I had barely time to give the proper instruc- tions to Brigadier-General Turchin on my left, and was communicat- ing the same to the right brigade, when the troops of Brigadier- General Judah, on General Schofield's right, came up with my left. His front line passed through my rear line before mine began to advance, and, thus interlaced, both went forward together. It was subsequently ascertained that the rebel line of works ran along the western slope of a ridge, which extended from near Resaca north- ward, on the west side of the railroad. A narrow valley, intersected along its length by a boggy creek, separated this from another ridge which lay parallel with and in front of our line. This our troops had to pass. It was covered for a space of nearly half a mile in width by so dense a growth of wood that an individual alone could make his way through it only with difficulty. It was utterly im- possible in this thicket for a regiment, much less for a brigade commander, to see and control the two extremities of his command. Yet our lines of battle worked through it and reached the crest over- looking the valley in as much order as could have been expected. From this position the rebel works could be distinctly seen, and could our men have been allowed to halt here, to reform and to re- adjust their lines, while an examination of the position should be made, better results might have ensued. It would appear that Major-General Schofield's left, in open ground, did not encounter the same difficulties as his right, and, pressing forward, the impul- sion was communicated along the line to his right, and carried my left brigade along with it. It was the affair of a moment, and be- fore I could learn (at 300 yards' distance upon the right) of the con- dition of affairs, it was too late to stop the movement. Descending about 100 feet the almost vertical slope of the ridge, our men emerged into the open valley, and into direct view, at short range, of the rebel works, and immediately received a fire of artillery and musketry. The tried veterans of this division, who had never failed to accomplish anything that was possible, did not falter, but pushed forward until they had reached the creek. Few got beyond this. Many stuck under the miry banks of the stream, and the few iso- lated groups that got beyond, not being in sufficient force to sustain themselves, were soon driven back. It was at once apparent that this effort had failed and was at an end, and most of the men were withdrawn to the summit of the ridge to be reformed. A few, unable on account of the sharp fire from the rebel works to leave the banks 736 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. of the creek, remained there until dark, doing valuable duty as sharpshooters. The movement of the First Brigade, along with Major-General Schofield's troops, had been so sudden, and the dis- tance to go being less, the Second Brigade did not reach the crest of the hill until after the failure of Major-General Schofield's right and my left had become known, and I did not have it advance far- ther. Our whole line, from the right of the Twentieth Corps to the left of the Twenty-third, continued to occupy this ridge during the afternoon, and, having placed numerous batteries in position, shelled the rebel works with fine effect. The loss which my command sus- tained in the operations of this day was as follows: Casualties May 14, 1864-killed, 2 officers and 14 enlisted men; wounded, 7 officers and 112 enlisted men; total, 9 officers and 126 enlisted men. During the day the Third Brigade, with the exception of the Eighteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, which remained to gar- rison Ringgold, came up and was placed in reserve behind the other brigades. On the morning of the 15th my division was with- drawn from the line and sent to the extreme right of the corps to aid in filling a gap caused by Major-General Hooker being taken out to operate on the left of Major-General Schofield. I there connected on my right with the left of the Fifteenth Corps of the Army of the Tennessee. The position was an important one, and my men worked industriously during the day and following night in advancing and strengthening our works, so as to give more perfect command of those of the enemy in our front. Our skirmishers were during this time hotly engaged with those of the rebels. May 16, during the night the skirmishers in front of my Third Bri- gade discovered signs of a movement of the enemy, and pressing for- ward shortly before daybreak, entered his lines and found them evacuated. Together with a party from the. First Division of the corps, which advanced about the same time, they pushed on into Resaca and were the first to enter that place, and the first to discover the entire withdrawal of the rebel forces to the south side of the river, Lieutenant-Colonel Wharton, of the Tenth Regiment Ken- tucky Volunteers, in charge of skirmishers from my Third Brigade, being the first officer who entered Resaca. The division was marched into the town and remained there until night to await the construc- tion of bridges on which to cross the Oostenaula in pursuit. At Re- saca the Eleventh Regiment Ohio Volunteers was detached from the First Brigade and left in garrison at that place, thus reducing the command by 278 men. It was soon after mustered out of the service. May 17, my wagons having been crossed over during the night, the division passed the river at 3 a. m., and, following closely upon the heels of the Fourth Corps, encamped at night two miles north of Adairsville. The advance guard of Major-General Howard had closed up with the enemy and was skirmishing -throughout the afternoon with his rear. May 18, the march was continued as upon the day previous, the enemy resisting strongly to cover the with- drawal of his trains. Passing through Adairsville, my division en- camped for the night four miles north of Kingston. May 19, march- ing through Kingston, I was there informed by Major-General Palmer that the enemy was exhibiting himself in a threatening atti- tude in our front, and I was ordered to post the division on a range of hills south of the town. This order was duly executed, but later, during the afternoon, other orders were received directing me to move out to the east of the town and go into line on the right of the CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.--ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 737 Fourth Corps. When I got to the position designated, that corps was already four miles out from the town. My line when formed con- nected with the right of Brigadier-General Wood, my right resting on the railroad. During the afternoon, previous to my arrival, I was informed that the enemy had displayed quite a formidable line of battle, but before my division reached the ground it had been retired from view. May 20, on this morning the rebel force was found to have again fallen back, having succeeded in passing his trains over the Etowah River at or near the railroad bridge, which was after- ward destroyed. Throughout this and the two following days our troops remained in position, fitting themselves with supplies, so as to be able to quit the railroad and move upon the enemy's flank. On the 22d, the Ninth Ohio Regiment, of the Second Brigade, whose term of service had expired, went North for the purpose of being mustered out. At the same time the Twenty-fourth Regiment Illinois Volunteers from the First Brigade, and the Tenth Regiment Indiana Volunteers from the Third Brigade, were detached and left in garrison at Kingston. The Twenty-fourth Illinois never after- ward rejoined the command, as its term of service soon expired. May 23, my division again marched, and, crossing the Etowah at Island Ford, encamped on Euharlee Creek. From this time until the end of the month we remained in rear guarding or escorting trains, generally not far from Burnt Hickory. June 1, leaving the First Brigade in charge of the trains at Burnt Hickory, I marched to the front with the other two and joined the main army, then going into position on the line running northerly from Dallas toward Acworth, east of Pumpkin Vine Creek. June 2, having relieved a portion of the First Division, Fourteenth Corps. and extended the line to the left, I at once advanced my front to a more commanding position and intrenched. We were then in close proximity to the strongly constructed works of the enemy, my right connecting with the First Division, Fourteenth Corps, and Major- General Schofield operating at a little distance on my left. During the 3d and 4th my men worked constantly, both night and day, ad- vancing our lines by pushing our skirmishers to the front, and then intrenching the troops upon the ground which they had gained. I thus, with trifling loss, drove the rebel skirmishers into their main works and put up batteries within short range of them. June 5, at daybreak, it was discovered that the enemy had withdrawn under the cover of night, abandoning a line of elaborately constructed field- works of great strength. We received no orders to pursue, but re- mained all day in our position. June 6, we again marched to the front upon the Burnt Hickory and Big Shanty road, and-at night I got into line on the left of the Twentieth Corps near Durham's house. Continuing at this point until the morning of the 10th, the First Brigade, relieved from duty with the trains, came up and joined the division. It had lost while away two regiments, the Eleventh Ohio and Twenty-fourth Illinois, by expiration of service. The Tenth In- diana, of the Third Brigade, came up to us about the same time. June 10, this division marched at 6 a. m. in front of the corps, the Army of the Tennessee on our left, moving along the railroad. We took such roads as we could parallel to it, and, after crossing Procter's Creek at the old mill, our advance guard of the Third Brigade soon struck the rebel skirmishers. These were readily driven back, and my line formed upon an eminence in front of Pine Mountain, in full 47 R B- VOQL XXXVIII, PT I 738 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. (CHAP. L. view of the rebel works upon it and within range of their batteries. Our artillery was at once put in position and kept up an effective cannonade during the afternoon while the Fourth Corps was coming into position on our right. The object in view at this point was to obtain control of the Burnt Hickory and Marietta road. Pine Moun- tain lying on this road commanded it. June 11, early in the day, the rebel skirmishers were driven back nearer to the base of the moun- tain, and my lines were advanced, but in the afternoon our whole corps was moved about a mile to the left so as to make room for the Fourth Corps to deploy. In my new position I was on the right of our corps, connecting with the Fourth Corps, our First Division on my left. My line faced toward the south and was located about a mile north of the Marietta and Big Shanty road, fronting the north- east end of Pine Mountain. June 12 and 13, no movement took place upon our portion of the line. June 14, our whole line advanced, and my left reached the Big [Shanty] road, where it intrenched. Di- rectly in front on the south side of the road the strongly built lines of the enemy, stretching from the base of Pine Mountain to the east, were discovered at a few hundred yards' distance. My right, nearer to the mountain, was more strongly resisted, and, although skirmish- ing hotly throughout the day with heavy loss, did not until dark succeed in dislodging the rebels from their rifle-pits or in gaining the road. June 15, the enemy having discovered that our lines were rapidly enveloping his advanced position of Pine Mountain, aban- doned it in the night, and on the morning of the 15th we took pos- session of that portion of his works. He had only, however, fallen back a short distance to a line of works already constructed, but it enabled the Fourth Corps and the two right divisions of our corps to swing forward a considerable distance. My own division moved about one and a half miles to the vicinity of Smith's house, when it again came upon the pickets in front of the rebel works, and was ordered to intrench and put up batteries. I was con- nected with the troops of Major-General Howard on my right and with our First Division on my left. June 16 and 17, gradually driving the enemy from the woods and other strong positions held by his advanced parties, I steadily pushed forward my lines and at length established my artillery in positions highly advantageous and commanding. During this time the practice of our gunners had been skillful and effective. We were again close up to the rebel fortifications, and they were of great strength, constructed with extreme care and everywhere fully garnished with artillery. They were field-works, requiring the slow operations almost of a siege to approach them. June 18, having been instructed by the corps commander that Major-General Howard, with the Fourth Corps, intended to swing forward toward the left, so as to sweep along the enemy's line, I was at the same time ordered to conform to this movement and ad- vance with those troops. My line of march was through a very difficult wood and morass nearly a mile in width, impassable for the artillery. It was, therefore, sent around by the left while the' troops worked their way through the woods. Passing this, we came into open ground immediately in front of works of the enemy. The Fourth Corps at the same time came up on my right and a sharp encounter ensued between our men and the rebels behind their breast-works, but the unceasing and rapid fire of our line kept theirs subdued, and our loss was less than could have been expected. I immediately ordered my men to creep forward as well as they could CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. and construct a cover for themselves on the crest of the open ground facing directly into the embrasures of the rebel batteries. Having no artillery with me, Capt. Hubert Dilger, of the First Ohio Artil- lery, belonging to the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, vol- unteered to bring up his guns, and, placing them upon the line where my men were intrenching, opened fire and maintained them there throughout the afternoon, displaying a splendid courage not often witnessed. The coolness and bravery displayed by my own men exceeds all praise, and by dark they had constructed a line of rifle-pits in open ground confronting the finished works of the enemy and within 500 yards of them. I had obtained a magnificent position and lost 40 men in so doing. June 19, the earliest dawn revealed to us another evacuation and falling back of the rebel army, this time to the lines of Kenesaw Mountain. My division, pursuing, came up in front of the central knob of the mountain, near Kirk's house, and, after a sharp skirmish, got into position close to the base of the mountain. June 20, the lines of the division were recti- fied and the works for protection strengthened and improved. Dur- ing the day we lost 30 men, killed and wounded by shells and by sharpshooters firing from the side of the mountain. From this time until the evening of the 26th our position was not materially changed. Under direct fire from the rebel skirmishers no man could expose himself without being a mark for their bullets. They kept our men closely confined to their trenches, and the only variety we had was the constant succession of artillery duels between our bat- teries and those upon the mountain top, which might be looked for at any time of the day or night. At times these displays assumed a degree of magnificence, as particularly the cannonade from our batteries on the afternoon of the 21st. My average daily loss of men killed and wounded in their camps and behind their works was about 20 men. June 26, the division of Brigadier-General Davis having been sent to the right of the Fourth Corps to unite with a division of that corps in an assault of the enemy's works, I was ordered there likewise to support him, and, being relieved after dark by Brigadier-General Osterhaus' division, of the Army of the Ten- nessee, I marched at once and by midnight got into bivouac near department headquarters. June 27, at an early hour my division was formed in rear of the assaulting columns of Brigadier-General Davis to support him in case of disaster, and after his repulse went forward into the line on his right, relieving Brigadier-General Geary's division, of the Twentieth Corps, which was next to us upon that side. On the 27th, Col. F. Van Derveer, commanding my Second Brigade, who had long been suffering from disease, was compelled to go North for relief, and turned over the command of the brigade to Col. N. Gleason, of the Eighty-seventh Indiana Vol- unteers, who has since retained it. In losing Colonel Van Derveer, my command, and the service generally, was deprived of one of its most gallant and best officers and most accomplished gentlemen, Always prompt, judicious, and brave, he had distinguished himself on many fields, and his promotion had been strongly urged upon the Government, but unaccountably overlooked. June 28, from this time until the 3d of July the locality of the division was not changed. Our works were at this time so close to those of the enemy that no man on either side dared show his head during the day, and the only advantage which we gained was in the constant pushing forward of our trenches toward theirs, done under the cover of night. To ex- Command. First Brigade, Brig. Gen. J. B. Turchin commanding: 17th Ohio Volunteers, Col. D. Ward ............................... 31st Ohio Volunteers, Col. M. B. Walker........................... 89th Ohio Volunteers, Col. C. H. Carlton ........................... 92d Ohio Volunteers, Col. B. D. Fearing......................... 82d Indiana Volunteers, Col. M. C. Hunter ................ . .... Total .... ....................................... Second Brigade, Col. N. Gleason, 87th Indiana, commanding: 2d Minnesota Volunteers, Lieut. Col. J. W. Bishop.............. 35th Ohio Volunteers, Maj. J. L. Budd ............. ............... 105th Ohio Volunteers, Lieut. Col. G. T. Perkins ................... 75th Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. William O'Brien .............. 87th Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. E. P. Hammond............. 101st Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. Thomas Doan ................ T otal ..................................... ...... ................. Third Brigade, Col. George P. Este, 14th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, com- manding: 10th Kentucky Volunteers, Col. W. H. Hays........................ 10th Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. M. B. Taylor.................. 14th Ohio Volunteers, Maj. John W. Wilson ....................... 38th Ohio Volunteers, Col.W. A. Choate........................... 74th Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. M. Baker .................... Total................................... ............... Total Infantry..................................................... 740 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP, L. hibit the changes which had taken place in the division up to this period and its subsequent strength, a new table of effective force is here given, taken from the reports of July 4: INFANTRY. Officers. 20 20 10 12 14 Men. 426 449 189 274 190 76 1,528 1,604 19 349 368 15 258 273 19 290 309 20 352 372 15 274 289 24 319 343 112 1,842 1,954 23 254 277 22 351 373 15 376 391 25 576 541 19 296 315 104 1,793 1,897 Total. 446 469 199 286 204 292 5,163 5,455 ARTILLERY. Command. Officers. Men. Total Horses. Guns. 7th Indiana Battery, First Lieut. O. H. Morgan ..... 4 133 137 60 4 19th Indiana Battery, First Lieut. W. P. Stackhouse. 3 134 137 65 4 Total Artillery ................. ............. 7 267 274 125 8 t Effective force of division-officers, 299; enlisted men, 5,430; total, 5,729; horses, 125; guns, 8. July 3, the enemy having again abandoned his works and fallen back during the night, my men entered them before daybreak and were prompt in pursuit, capturing a large number of prisoners. We marched at an early hour, and, passing through Marietta, had advanced about two miles along the right side of the railroad when we came upon a new line of works in which the rebel army had taken position. It was here that the last stand to cover the passage of the trains over the Chattahoochee was made. July 4 was spent in reconnoitering this position. Our troops were pressed close up to the works and a constant skirmish was kept up along our front during the day, but no general assault made. At this point my Second Brigade was detached and sent to Marietta to constitute the garrison of that place. July 5, the enemy, not waiting for an attack, had again given up his laboriously constructed works and retreated to the river during the night. So soon as this was discovered our troops pursued, my division taking a road leading toward Vining's Station and lying a short distance south of the railroad. Prisoners were taken and stragglers picked up almost from the outset, and CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 741 some distance before reaching Vining's the head of my column came upon a strong rear guard of the enemy. The Tenth Indiana Volun- teers, skirmishing in our front, pressed this party handsomely and vigorously, driving it beyond the road, and the conduct of Col. M. B. Taylor, commanding that regiment on this occasion, is worthy of praise. On reaching the heights overlooking the station a rebel train was discovered moving south beyond the river, and one of my batteries, hastily brought up, shelled it with much apparent effect. My line of march would at this point have led me to cross the rail- road and move in the direction of Pace's Ferry, but encountering the head of Brigadier-General Wood's division, of the Fourth Corps, which came down that road and arrived soon after I did, his column, to avoid confusion, was turned to the left toward Pace's Ferry, whilst mine, turning to the right, pursued the railroad. I had marched about one and a half miles along this road, skirmish- ing lightly, but not strongly resisted, when I came upon the head of our First Division (Fourteenth Army Corps) column, which, tak- ing a shorter road, was coming in on my right and reached the rail- road in front of me. These troops immediately abutted upon the strong rebel works on the road, a part of the continuous line consti- tuting the tete-de-pont of the railroad crossing. My troops were then formed, by direction of the major-general commanding the corps, so as to connect with the left of the First Division, and extending back along the line of the railroad. July 6, 7, and 8, during these days, while other portions of the army were working themselves into posi- tion, this division remained stationary, the skirmish lines alone keep- ing up a constant and continuous fire from their pits. July 9, hav- ing received orders to push out my skirmishers and feel the enemy for the purpose of developing his position I caused Colonel Este, whose brigade was the most advanced, to deploy a heavy line, and, supporting it by a regiment, directed him to make the advance re- quired. I at the same time was informed that the skirmishers of the First Division on my right would advance with ours, and I directed those of the First Brigade, although more remote from the enemy's works, to keep up their connection with Este's left. Hav- ing selected the Tenth Kentucky to support his advance, Colonel Este began his movement at 8 a. m. .The more advanced pickets of the enemy were readily driven back and our men gained some hun- dreds of yards distance to the front. They came, however, upon a very heavy line posted in strong pits, and these supported by heavy reserves. The troops on the right had at the same time gained a por- tion of the rebel works, but were almost immediately driven back, and the enemy then pushed out in superior force upon my men and compelled them to retire almost to their original position. The arrival of another regiment again gave us the command of the posi- tion, and the rebels fell back to their pits; but as their presence in considerable force, both in their works and in front on their skir- mish line, had been ascertained, a second advance was not ordered. In this little fight, which was brief but severe, we lost 4 men killed and 19 wounded. Colonel Este, who commanded the line in person, was severely bruised by a bullet and narrowly escaped losing his leg. He displayed the utmost bravery, as did the officers and men generally who were engaged. In the afternoon I advanced my whole line and intrenched it, and the Fourth Corps connected with me on the left. July 10, the passage of the river some miles above having been at length effected by the Twenty-third Corps, the -~aw~rarsrssa irotDrp 742 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. (CHAP. L. last of the rebels were withdrawn to the south bank during the previous night and the bridges were burned. Major-General How- ard then moved his troops to the support of the Twenty-third Corps, and my division replaced him in his position at Pace's Ferry. I moved into this position before night. July 11, from this date until the 17th my command remained stationary, picketing the river- bank. In the interval the Twenty-third Regiment Missouri Volun- teers, assigned by Major-General Thomas to my First Brigade, came up and joined the command. The Second Brigade likewise came forward from Marietta, leaving only the Second Regiment Minne- sota Volunteers at that place, and rejoined the division. In the same interval also Brigadier-General Turchin was compelled to go North for the benefit of his health, and the command of the brigade devolved upon Col. M. B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio, who has re- tained it until this time. July 17, pontoon bridges having been completed at Pace's Ferry, and the Fourth Corps from above hav- ing cleared the opposite shore, we crossed the river, the First and Second Divisions preceding mine. July 18, the corps advanced, passing Nancy's Creek at Kyle's Ferry, and encamped at night with our advance at Howell's Mill, on Peach Tree Creek, the Twentieth Corps being a little above us on our left. July 19, most of the day was spent in reconnoitering the creek, which was deep, and, the bridges being destroyed, the passage was difficult. In front of Howell's Mill, the point occupied by the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, the crossing was strongly disputed, and the character of the ground admitted of such easy defense that to have forced a passage must have been hazardous and attended with much loss. In the afternoon, however, the Second Division succeeded in getting over lower down, and I, being in reserve, sent my First Brigade to cross with it. I had at first been directed by Major-General Thomas to cross my division at that place, but on going there and finding it occupied by Brigadier-General Davis, the order was modified by the corps commander, and a single one of my brigades sent to support him. This brigade, having crossed, g6t into position about dark, after a brisk skirmish on the left of the Second Division. The Twentieth Corps, higher vp the stream, had likewise got over dur- ing the afternoon, and this doubtless induced the force in front of Brigadier-General Johnson to retire. As soon as it had done so I was ordered with my Second and Third Brigades to pass to the front of him and cross at the mill. I began the movement soon after dark, being obliged in the first place to build a temporary bridge, and by midnight had the two brigades well intrenched upon the heights on the south side of the creek. July 20, at daylight Brigadier-General Johnson's division crossed over and went into position on my left; it also made a connection with the Twentieth Corps on the other flank. I at the same time moved forward my Third Brigade, and forming it on the left of the First, which had crossed with the command of Brigadier-General Davis, pushed the two out and took possession of an important range of wooded hills half a mile to the front of my first location. As these troops went into position, and, indeed, throughout the day, they were subjected to a very galling fire from rebel batteries which were posted beyond the ridge and out of our reach. To enable these two brigades to make a still farther advance I posted my two batteries at a point on Brigadier-General Johnson's front, from which they would have a cross-fire upon the wooded ground over which the troops must pass. CHP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 743 The batteries had gone into position, but had not opened fire, when the great assault made that day upon the Twentieth Corps and the First Division of our corps took place, and they did good service in aiding to repel that attack. No part of the rebel assaulting columns reached my lines, but throughout the whole attack and until dark my troops were subjected to an artillery fire as constant and as terrible as any that I have ever witnessed, and the loss in the division from this cause and upon the skirmish line was considerable. Through- out the whole both my officers and my men behaved themselves with a degree of coolness and heroism highly commendable and showing them to be veteran soldiers. (July 21. about this time the batteries were relieved from duty with the division and ordered to report to corps headquarters.) July 21, after a hot skirmish of some hours, my lines were again moved forward nearly a mile, established, and intrenched at a short distance from the works of the enemy, in a position so advantageous and commanding that it must have con- tributed largely to compelling him to retire. July 22, during the night previous the rebel army fell back finally from our front into the works about Atlanta, and my division, marching forward until it came to the Marietta and Atlanta road, followed it until it struck the railroad two miles from the city. We there came up with the First Division, Fourteenth Corps, whose advance guard was then skir- mishing close up to the line of works surrounding that place. The Twentieth Corps was immediately to the left, and the Army of the Tennessee some miles to the eastward on the Augusta railroad. I immediately received orders from Major-General Thomas to move to the south along the west side of the town until I came to the inter- section of the Atlanta and Turner's Ferry road with that leading from White Hall to the latter place, and there to post my command. This point was reached without opposition, and my troops were put in position under the supervision of the department commander, who had come to that place. The Second Division on arriving formed on my right a little retired, and all of our troops intrenched themselves during the afternoon, so as to be covered while within camp from the shells and sharpshooters of the enemy. It was at this time that the great battle with the Army of the Tennessee, in which the gallant McPherson was killed, took place, and we waited anxiously, expecting orders to take part in it. July 23, from this date until the 3d of August the general location of the division was not changed. A constant and venomous skirmish was kept up be- tween the pickets on both sides, and our lines were so close that our men in camp were at any moment that they exposed themselves liable to be picked off by the enemy's riflemen. Our batteries and those upon the rebel forts kept up an unceasing exchange of compliments, so that our daily loss in killed and wounded in camp was not inconsid- erable. Numerous 20-pounder shells, and shells of sixty-four pounds' weight from the "old 32-pounder rifle," came regularly into our camps, a weight of metal entirely out of proportion to our light field pieces. While in this position two regiments of the First Bri- gade, the Eighty-second Indiana and the Twenty-third Missouri, drove the enemy, after sharp skirmishing, from some wooded heights on our right and in front, which they fortified and held until turned over to the Second Division. These hills were not properly in our front, but, in the hands of the enemy, were annoy- ing to us, and the regiments deserve honorable mention for this service. On the 27th the Army of the Tennessee passed around our THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. r0HAP. L. rear and took position on our right, and on the 28th was attacked by the rebel army in force, making one of the chief battles of the campaign. A single change in the strength of my command took place at that time-the Thirty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, being ordered to Vining's Station, on August 3, never afterward returned, being mustered out at that point. August 3, the Fourteenth Army Corps, having received orders to move to the extreme right of the army, with the view of forming a column of support upon the right flank of Major-General Scho- field's command, to protect, cover, and sustain him in certain offen- sive operations which he proposed to carry into execution, marched on this morning. My division, in rear of the other two, came up with them already encamped about two miles to the north of Utoy Creek, and passing through them and also through the lines of Brigadier-General Cox's division, of the Twenty-third Corps, the head of my column came up to the creek near an old mill. On the way I was informed that Brigadier-General Hascall's division, of the same corps, was about to cross the stream, and I was ordered to move my column so as to cover his right flank. When I arrived at his position he had already gotten over and with but little resistance, and was establishing his line on the first range of open hills to the left of the road. It was then about 5 p. m., when, meeting Major- General Sherman, I was ordered by him to put my division in line on Brigadier-General Hascall's right, but to throw back my own right so as to rest on the creek. This order was at once carried into execution, yet it was quite dark before all the troops got into posi- tion. My line taking the highest ground stretched along the road for the length of a brigade beyond Brigadier-General Hascall, and then bent to the rear. Its length was so great that I was required to put nearly all my troops in a single line, while the division just formed on my left was compactly formed and held a brigade in reserve. This disposition I thought strange, since I had been sent out simply to support another division while it performed a certain work. August 4, in the morning, my lines were rectified so as to conform better to the ground, the batteries were put in position, and the works thrown up during the night strengthened. About mid- day, as no movement of the troops on my left seemed to be in prepa- ration, although I was told that an advance was contemplated, I reported in person at the headquarters of the corps two miles back of the creek, and while there I saw the First and Second Divisions of the corps just moving out and passing toward the front. I then returned to my command, and soon after received a written order from Major-General Palmer directing me to advance my right with a view to gaining the high ground on my right front, and inform- ing me that Brigadier-General Morgan would cross the creek on my right and support the movement. It also stated that this movement was intended as a preliminary to an advance upon the enemy's works, should that be judged expedient or ordered, and for which I would be expected to furnish the assaulting column. It further directed me to push out my skirmishers and begin the move- ment as soon as Brigadier-General Morgan should begin crossing. A little later I received another written order, also from Major- General Palmer, stating that it was intended that I should push out with Brigadier-General Hascall as far as practicable and reconnoiter the enemy's works, and directing me to attack in column if the works could be carried. The first part of these instructions had OHAP. L.1 REPORTS, ETC.--ARMY O THE CUMBERLAND. already been carried out before the order was received, for I had, the night previous, taken possession of all the high ground in that vicinity, and it only remained for me to await the other contingen- cies-the arrival of Brigadier-General Morgan or the advance of Brigadier-General Hascall. I had made full preparations, and was awaiting accordingly, when, about 4 p. m., Major-General Palmer came up in person and asked me if my brigade was ready for the reconnaissance. I replied that no special mention had been made of sending out a brigade on that duty, and asked if he wished me to send one. He replied that he did, and I at once detailed Colonel Gleason's brigade for that purpose. The brigade was formed in the shortest possible time in two lines, with a strong skirmishing party in front, and at once moved out. The operation was vigorously conducted and two lines of skirmish pits captured. The party kept on until the location and character of the rebel main line was fully developed and a heavy fire of artillery and musketry drawn from it. This accomplished, and no movement whatever of the troops on our left having been made, and no tidings received of Brigadier- General Morgan, I at dark directed Colonel Gleason to bring his men back to their works, leaving his skirmishers in the first pits. Colonel Gleason and his officers and men deserve the highest praise for the manner in which this affair was conducted. They brought in 25 prisoners, and the brigade sustained a loss of 26 in killed and wounded. August 5, at 4.30 o'clock in the morning, I received, directly from Major-General Schofield, commanding the Twenty-third Army Corps, an order prescribing movements for the Fourteenth and Twenty-third Corps upon that day, embracing operations proposed for this division, and I at once. wrote a note to him stating that I knew of no authority under which he could assume to give orders to my division, which belonged to the Army of the Cumberland, but informing him that I would communicate his wishes to my com- manding officer. As the order of Major-General Schofield detailed at length operations for all the troops acting on the right of the army, and being always anxious to perform my part in whatever may be calculated to promote the success of our arms, I immediately went to my troops to prepare them for the execution of the orders in case they should receive the proper sanction of my commander, or to be in readiness to co-operate, on my own responsibility, in any movement which the troops near me might undertake. The order from Major-General Schofield, alluded to above, directed me to move at 6 a. m., to push forward my whole line, conforming it to the direc- tion of that of the enemy, and, driving in his skirmishers, to press on until I had drawn the fire of his line. The Second Division, com- manded by Brigadier-General Morgan, was directed to support my right in the movement and, if possible, to prolong my line when formed. I was also directed to move without reference to my con- nection with Brigadier-General Hascall, as Brigadier-General Cox would stand ready to fill any interval between us. It was 4.30 a. m. when I gave notice to Major-General Schofield that I did not recog- nize his authority, and both his headquarters and those of our corps were within a mile of mine, yet it was not until 6.30 a. m. that he wrote me another note, saying that my corps commander would communicate the order to me properly, and at about 7 a. m. notice was given me that the corps would act during the day under the direction of Major-General Schofield. About that same time I 746 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CAP. L. found the head of Brigadier-General Cox's column well closed up in rear of my left, but I was informed that Brigadier-General Hascall would make no movement during the day, as his lines were already so close to those of the enemy that a farther advance was not possible. When I did finally receive authentic orders from my commanding officer for a movement I had not yet heard from Brigadier-General Morgan, who was to move on my right flank. I did not know how far below us he had crossed the creek, nor how far distant he might be, but convinced from my expe- rience of the day before that, if anything was to be accomplished, I must act independently of connections, taking care of my own flanks, I instructed my officers accordingly. The reconnaissance of the night previous had made us thoroughly acquainted with the ground we were to pass over, as well as with the position which we wished to take up, and it took but a short time to prepare for the move. A doubly strong skirmish line was thrown out from each brigade, sup- ported by heavy reserves, and the troops were prepared to follow. A perfect understanding was then established between the officers along the line, and at a signal given about 8 o'clock the skirmishers dashed forward. The more distant rifle-pits, which had been taken the evening before, but not held by us, had been reoccupied by a largely increased force, and much strengthened, with orders to the rebel officers in charge to hold them to the last extremity. This order, by keeping them there, enabled us to take more prisoners than we would otherwise have done. Our men were met by a very heavy fire, but pushed on so rapidly that the struggle was of short duration, and a few minutes put us in possession of all the ground up to within short musket-range of the rebel main works. With the capture of the rebel skirmish line. the forward movement of my troops was brought to an end, but their exposure to the fire of the main works did not cease. The regiments being brought up to take position and intrench themselves upon the new line were subjected throughout the day to a galling musketry fire from the rebel main works, as well as from his batteries, from which our loss was con- siderable. In the very handsome charge of the skirmish line Capt. Michael Stone, of the Thirty-first Ohio Volunteers, commanded the skirmishers of the First Brigade; Maj. R. C. Sabin, Eighty- seventh Indiana, those of the Second Brigade, and Maj. William Irving, Thirty-eighth Ohio, those of the Third Brigade, and deserve special mention for their gallantry. Maj. William Irving was wounded in the leg, which has since been amputated, and a little later in the day the brave Lieut. Col. Myron Baker, commanding the Seventy-fourth Indiana, was shot dead whilst putting his regiment in the line. My casualties amounted in all to 5 officers and 78 enlisted men killed and wounded, whilst we captured about 140 prisoners. All engaged in this affair, both officers and men, behaved as hand- somely as men could do, and are deserving of the highest praise. When I first got into position the Second Division had not yet come up, and my two right regiments were refused so as to cover that flank; but later, when those troops did arrive, all were brought up on the same line. Whilst I was making my advance, and through- out the day and until dark, no movement was made by the troops of the Twenty-third Corps on my left, although the line of rebel rifle- pits captured by my men extended along Brigadier-General Hascall's front, and could have been carried easily by a charge simultaneously with mine. They were the same pits which were taken two days CHAP. L] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. later by the troops of our First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. August 6, about daybreak in the morning the troops of the Twenty-third Army Corps were withdrawn from my left to be transferred to the extreme right, and were replaced by the First Di- vision of our corps, commanded by Brigadier-General King. The operations of the two corps for that day again were detailed and promulgated in a lengthy order from Major-General Schofield, is- sued the night previous, but as the part to be performed by my division was dependent upon the movements of Brigadier-Generals Cox and Hascall, who were expected to turn the enemy's left flank or to break through his line in the vicinity of the Sandtown road, and as those movements did not appear to be carried into execution, my men remained in their works. It was on the same day that Major-General Palmer relinquished the command of the Fourteenth Corps and turned it over to Brigadier-General Johnson. August 7, the First Division having made arrangements to push out and take the skirmish pits of the enemy, corresponding with those captured by my men on the 5th, I ordered a strong demonstration along my whole line to aid them. In some places my works were so close to those of the rebels that the men could not go out of them, but in others the skirmishers were pressed out strongly and a sharp encounter of some duration ensued. It ended in my advancing my left regiments some 200 yards, and those on the right, which had been retired, came up on line with the others. Brigadier-General Morgan moved forward at the same time and our divisions joined near the junction of the Sandtown and Lick Skillet roads. In the operations of that day I lost 66 men killed and wounded. The loss in the First Divis- ion was of course heavy, but it gained both prisoners and an ad- vanced position. I have been thus minute and circumstantial in my narrative of events since coming in contact with the Twenty- third Army Corps, inasmuch as complaint was made to the major- general commanding the Department of the Cumberland that the Fourteenth Corps had failed to accomplish its portion of the work marked out, when, in point of fact, every advantage of any kind that was gained from the time we moved to the right up to the 8th of August was achieved by the Fourteenth Corps. August 8, from this date until the 26th the general position and disposition of my troops was not changed. The necessary location of our camps was such that they were constantly exposed to the enemy's fire, and there were few points at which a man could show himself without the risk of being shot. On certain portions of the line a temporary truce would be arranged with the troops that chanced to be in front, whilst at others a vicious skirmish would be kept up, and for days the men would be imprisoned in their trenches, not daring to show their heads above the parapet, and this varied by the fire of artillery or more active demonstrations begun by one or the other party. In this passive condition, with no operations on hand, our daily reports presented not unfrequently a list of 10, 20, or 30 cas- ualties, and the long continuance of the confinement and privation were extremely trying, yet the men bore all with a degree of cheer- fulness, patience, and heroism that can find its reward only in the consciousness of duty well performed and of devotion to the holy cause in which they were engaged. During our long stay in such close proximity to the enemy, deserters from their lines, chiefly from Alabama regiments, came in constantly and in large numbers. They finally became so numerous that the most strenuous means were resorted to by the rebel officers to prevent them. 748 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [ChAo. L. On the 22d of August Brigadier-General Davis, having received the brevet of major-general, and been assigned to the command of the Fourteenth Corps, relieved Brigadier-General Johnson, who was transferred out of the corps. August 26, a general movement of the entire army to the right, by which we were to break off from our railroad communications and throw ourselves upon the Atlanta and Macon Railroad, having been decided upon, the Fourth and Twen- tieth Corps had already been withdrawn from before -the city, and on the night of the 26th the Fourteenth Corps and the Army of the Tennessee were also to withdraw and pass to the right, going in rear of the Twenty-third Corps, and of the Fourth Corps, then in posi- tion on the right of the former. The operation of withdrawing from such close proximity to the enemy was one of much delicacy. At 8 p. m. the Army of the Tennessee and the First Division of our (Four- teenth) corps drew out and began the march, leaving my division on the extreme left. I should have marched immediately after them, but for delays and detentions caused by the trains of other com- mands and the artillery, I did not feel authorized to quit my position until nearly 3 o'clock. The enemy was doubtless apprised by the noise of our trains and artillery that some movement was taking place, and opened upon us from his batteries, but beyond this we were not disturbed, and withdrew most successfully. August 27, arriving at the left of the Twenty-third Corps, our troops were formed upon it, facing to the north to cover the further withdrawal and arrangement of the trains, and we remained in that position until the following morning. August 28, we again marched, my division following the Second, which formed the head of the column. The advance guard of that division had some little skirmishing, which did not delay our march, and in the afternoon we went into position near Red Oak Station, on the West Point railroad. We formed line south of the road, Brigadier-General Morgan on my right, and Brig- adier-General Carlin, commanding the First Division, on my left, reaching to the railroad. The Fourth Corps prolonged our line, and was north of the road. August 29, the army remained stationary, and the troops were employed in destroying the railroad, in making reconnaissances, and in cutting roads. August 30, we moved on in a southeasterly direction, and reaching the Rough and Ready and Fay- ette road at Couch's house, took position there for the night. The Army of the Tennessee was a few miles distant on the right; the Fourth Corps connected with the Fourteenth on the left, and the Twenty-third Corps was still farther to the left, toward Rough and Ready. August 31, having heard trains of the enemy during the night moving south along our front, our skirmishers pushed out and at daybreak discovered them, although at a considerable distance, still moving in that direction. They were on a road to the east of Flint River. As soon as this was reported to me I sent forward a battery, supported by Colonel Walker's brigade, and opened a fire of shell upon the wagons, which compelled them to turn back and quit the road. A reconnoitering party from this brigade was then pushed for- ward about two miles, crossing Flint River, and until it reached the Rough and Ready and Jonesborough road near Smith's, and imme- diately after the entire division, with Colonel Mitchell's brigade, of the Second Division, ordered to report to me, were brought up and posted at this point. As soon as our troops had secured themselves in this position, about 4 p. m., I detailed Colonel Carlton's regiment, of the First Brigade, together with large parties from each of the CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETOC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 749 other two brigades, and sent them forward with orders to reach the Macon railroad, if possible, and if they were able, to hold themselves upon it. The party struck that road at Morrow's, or Chapman's, Sta- tion, a point four miles from Jonesborough, seven miles from Rough and Ready, and about two and.a half miles from our position. The road was reached about 6 p. m., and a considerable party of rebel cavalry encountered there, and, as the nature of the country ad- mitted readily of our men being cut off from the division, Colonel Carlton, after destroying three cars which he had captured, fell back some quarter of a mile to higher ground on the edge of the woods. As soon as I learned of this success and that the railroad was so re- mote from the rest of our troops, I sent out Colonel Gleason's bri- gade to occupy a ridge nearly a mile in our front, and detached three other regiments to strengthen the party on the railroad. The wholo of this detachment being then under the command of Colonel Hunter, Eighty-second Indiana Volunteers, the senior officer, he again moved it up to the road, and after putting up a defensive work, which occupied most of the night, he set his men to work to take up the track. It was not until late that I learned that the Fourth and Twenty-third Corps had also reached the railroad near Rough and Ready, and were there intrenching. My little party moved out inde- pendent of every one else, and, although opposed and constantly men- aced by the rebel cavalry, struck the road some miles in advance of any other. Colonel Hunter and his officers and men deserve much credit for their enterprise and determination. September 1, about 8 a. m. I received notice that the Fourteenth Corps would be concentrated at my position on the Jonesborough road, to move by it toward that place, whilst the Fourth Corps would move simultaneously along the railroad, I being also directed to withdraw my men from it so as to be ready for the movement. Brigadier-General Carlin's division coming in from the rear, took the advance along the road, and was followed by that of Brigadier- General Morgan. Whilst waiting for these troops to stretch out upon the road my party from the railroad came in, but it was not until 12 m. that the road was clear for me to march. BATTLE OF JONESBOROUGH. On arriving near the creek, two miles north of Jonesborough, I met Major-General Thomas, and was informed that Brigadier-Gen- eral Morgan had already formed beyond the creek, connecting with the left of the Army of the Tennessee, that Brigadier-General Car- lin had also crossed, and was forming to the left of Brigadier-Gen- eral Morgan, and I was expected to go into line on the left of Carlin. Morgan's skirmishers were then engaged with those of the enemy, but Carlin's had not yet struck them. I at once turned to the left, leaving the high road, to march toward my position, and as the head of my column passed the creek, I met one of my staff officers, whom I had sent out in advance, bringing orders from General Davis. He directed me to post my division in rear of an interval between Brig- adier-Generals Morgan and Carlin, through which he was fearful that the enemy would pass, and the precise ground on which it was desired that I should form was pointed out. General Davis, coming up immediately after, confirmed the correctness of the disposition. Before, however, this order could be executed, I received another, directing this division to form on Brigadier-General Carlin and pro- 750 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN., [CHAP. L. long his line to the left. My column was at once turned in that di- rection, and I rode forward along the intrenchments which Briga- dier-General Carlin's men had thrown up to find the point at wh'ch my right would rest. Finding this point I also found that division just put in motion, marching toward the right and front, and I fol- lowed a short distance to discover the direction which I would have to take, and the best route for getting into position. My column followed closely in rear of the First Division, and by the time that it had become stationary, and was formed, was close up in rear of the left flank. Not one moment was lost by this division, for at the very moment that the point where it was to rest became determined it was on the spot. Brigadier-General Carlin's left reached just to the railroad, and then joined the head of Major-General Stanley's column, the Fourth Corps, which had arrived. I accordingly caused my troops to be massed in rear of Brigadier-General Carlin's left. Having seen Major-General Stanley, and finding that he was willing to make way for me, and understanding it to be the intention of Major-General Thomas' order that our line should be prolonged be- yond the railroad in case it should reach that far, I rode forward to examine the ground. I passed along the east side of the road some distance beyond our lines without meeting with opposition, and, having discovered an advantageous position, was about to bring my division up to it. I had given the order, and the troops were about to march, when I received contrary instructions requiring me to hold my division west of the road as a reserve to support the other two. Soon after that, at near 4 o'clock, Brigadier-General Carlin's line moved forward and, by direction of General Davis, I moved Colonel Este's brigade in line of battle behind General Car- lin's left brigade, the left flank of both keeping along the railroad. My other two brigades moved in column on the road leading along the right of the railway. The deployed lines of my Third Brigade had to work their way through a thick wood, nearly a third of a mile in width, before reaching the open ground stretching in front of the wood in which were the rebel works, and having put this bri- gade in motion, I moved forward with the other two. On reaching a cabin beyond the woods, marked on the accompanying map, I met General Davis, who informed me that he had sent Colonel Este's bri- gade, which came up in advance of me, to support the right brigade of Brigadier-General Carlin, which had been severely handled in an attempt to advance upon the rebel works. A staff officer arriving at the same moment with a message from Brigadier-General Carlin created the impression that there was some misunderstanding of their respective relations between that officer and Colonel Este, whereupon General Davis sent word to Colonel Este that he was to report to General Carlin and be subject to his orders. Fearful that some ill result might arise should the orders still not be understood, and notwithstanding that the brigade was thus placed under the con- trol of another division commander, I volunteered to go myself and give personal supervision to the execution of all orders. General Davis told me as I started that he wished Colonel Este to replace the right brigade of Brigadier-General Carlin, the regular brigade, and then to advance upon the enemy along with the other troops on the right and left when they advanced. As I passed to the right I had an opportunity for a hasty glance at the ground constituting the field of fight, and the rough map which is attached to this report, * See p. 756. CHAP. L.) REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 751 made from actual bearings and distances taken by myself, gives the most accurate representation of it that I have seen. It represents the rebel works and the position of my three brigades quite accu- rately, and that of Brigadier-General Carlin's two brigades approxi- mately, at the moment when Colonel Este began to move forward. Our troops were in open ground, which was bordered on the south by a very regular line of woodland, running due east and west, and extending from near the railroad to the west a distance of 620 yards or steps. The line of woods then turned and ran south, facing westward upon another field in which were the troops of Brigadier- General Morgan. The rebel works lay within the wood, and were entirely concealed from view. They approached at the nearest point to within fifteen yards of the open ground, but at others were 60, 80, or 100 yards back in the woods. From the northwest angle of the woods ran northerly a kind of ravine and thicket, appar- ently an old fence line, which separated the field in which the Sec- ond Division lay from that occupied by the First and Third Divis- ions. I found Colonel Moore's brigade, of the First Division, formed in two lines, the one near the cabin, and the other intrenched along the edge of the woods, its left on the railroad. Apparently the reg- ular brigade had endeavored to take up a position on the same line in the edge of the woods, but the rebel works in their front approach- ing so much nearer to the open ground, it was, of course, impossible, without first taking the works in the woods. It was in this way, doubtless, that it lost so heavily before my men came up. I found it to the right of the other brigade of the First Division, and some 200 yards back in the open field partially covered by an undulation of the ground in front. Colonel Este's brigade, when it came up, was formed in the position represented on the map, fifty yards in rear of the regular brigade, in two lines of battle. The Tenth Ken- tucky and the Thirty-eighth Ohio in the first line, the Tenth Ken- tucky on the right, and the Seventy-fourth Indiana and the Four- teenth Ohio in the second line, the Seventy-fourth Indiana on the right. Colonel Walker's and Colonel Gleason's brigades were in reserve, and then just coming up to take position. Seeing that to re- lieve Major Edie's brigade required Colonel Este to pass to the front of it, and that to come into line with Colonel Moore, so as to advance at the same time with the other troops might involve a serious assault of works hidden in the woods, I directed the men to unsling and pile their knapsacks, and fix bayonets, so as to be ready for heavy work. Our uncertainty with regard to the works we might encounter was increased from having been told that 'the rebels had two lines, one of which had been taken by our men, some of whom remained in them, allof which turned out to be a delusion. The order to move forward was given at 4.45 p. m., when the lines moved off handsomely. Attended by a single staff officer, Captain Acheson, assistant adjutant-general, and two orderlies, I accompa- nied Colonel Este, so as to be ready to give him any assistance which he might require. Our men passing over the lines of the reg- ular brigade soon reached the crest in front, and at about 100 yards from the works began to receive a murderous fire of musketry and canister. They were immediately put at the charge, and without faltering the whole line moved splendidly into the woods. On the right the success was immediate and complete. The Tenth Ken- tucky, followed by the Seventy-fourth Indiana, struck upon the short projecting point of rifle-pit called the first line and carried it, 752 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. as well as the main line. extending thence to the right. A single dash, after entering the woods, gave them the victory. The rebel troops, confident in themselves and in their ability to hold their works, were totally unprepared for a charge of this kind, and were taken completely by surprise. They delivered a single volley, and before they could reload found our men in the trenches with them, bayoneting all who did not surrender. Three companies on the right of the Seventy-fourth Indiana,which overlapped the Tenth Kentucky, obliquing to the right, entered the woods at the east end of the battery of four guns on the angle, and driving the enemy out took possession of the guns. They belonged to a battery of the consolidated Eighth and Nineteenth Arkansas Regiments, and Lieutenant Kuder, of the Seventy-fourth Regiment Indiana Volunteers, capturing the battery flag, brought it away with him. After holding this battery for some minutes, until the troops of the next brigade on the right came up in the rear and en- tered it, these companies closed to the left on their own regiment, leaving the guns with the newcomers. As the only material evidence of the capture brought away was the flag, the guns themselves being left with the Second Division, Colonel Este has procured statements from several of his officers and men who were present, and for- wards them with his report. On the left our men were not immedi- ately so successful. The Thirty-eighth and Fourteenth Ohio Regi- ments, after entering the woods, formed a line extending from the short projecting work to the left, but the distance to the rebel main work being greater than on the right, and the approach to it more obstructed by fallen trees, they could not at once reach it. They remained in this position, subjected to a most terrible fire coming obliquely down the works from the rebel right, for some minutes after the right wing had achieved its success. Colonel Este, who was at this point of the line, finding that the troops on our left did not or could not move forward with us as we had been led to expect that they would, began to fear that his men could not hold on where they were, and sent for re-enforcements. Seeing at the same time a regiment of Brigadier-General Morgan's left brigade, the Seven- teenth New York, marching up to go into place in rear of our right, where it was no longer needed, Colonel Este appealed to the com- manding officer, requesting him to put in his regiment on our left where it could be most useful, and guided him to the place. The fire of the enemy at this point was most destructive, yet the gallant Colonel [Grower] carried his regiment into position with a heroic bravery challenging the highest admiration, and was himself al- most the first to fall before it. The regiment seeing this, for a moment faltered, but was at once reassured, and the order to charge being given, rushed forward along with the Fourteenth and Thirty- eighth Ohio, and captured not only the works, but nearly all in them. This ended the battle, as all that followed was desultory firing or shots from distant artillery. This charge of my Third Brigade-one of the most magnificent on record, and the first during this cam- paign in which works upon either side have been assaulted and car- ried-was productive of the greatest results in opening the way for the advance of the troops on our right and left, and destroying the morale of the boldest and most confident troops in the rebel army. The losses sustained attest the severity of the struggle. Out of 1,100 officers and men who went into the action 75 were killed and 255 wounded; nearly 1 out of every 3 being hit, and all in a space CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 753 of thirty minutes' time. Among those who fell was the gallant Colonel Choate, of the Thirty-eighth Ohio, who has since died of his wounds. Major Wilson, commanding the Fourteenth Ohio, lost his leg, and numerous others of our best officers and men on this glorious occasion sacrificed themselves upon the altar of their coun- try. For the names of those who particularly distinguished them- selves, I refer to reports of brigades and regiments. On no occa- sion within my own knowledge has the use of the bayonet been so general or so well authenticated. Three brothers named Noe, of the Tenth Kentucky, went over the rebel parapet together, and two of them pinned their adversaries to the ground with the bayonet, and as an officer of the Seventy-fourth Indiana was about to be bayo- neted by a rebel, a soldier warded off the blow, and, after some moments of fencing, transfixed his antagonist. These, as the wounded rebels show, are but isolated instances. The brigade captured 426 prisoners, including 55 officers from the rank of colonel down. They were from the Second, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Ninth Kentucky; the Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Arkan- sas; the Twenty-eighth, Thirty-fourth, and Forty-sixth Alabama; the Twenty-fourth South Carolina, and the Sixty-third Virginia Regiments. It also captured the battle-flags of the Sixth and Seventh Arkansas Regiments, and the battery flag heretofore spoken of. In closing the report of this battle, and while testifying to the heroic conduct of all officers and men of the brigade, I cannot over- look the splendid gallantry of Colonel Este, commanding it. His horse was shot under him and his clothing torn with bullets, yet he retained the utmost coolness and managed his command with a high degree of judgment and skill. I hope that he will receive the reward which his service merits. I must also make honorable mention of the bravery of Capt. J. W. Acheson, the only staff officer I had with me, who was wounded while riding with me in the charge. My First and Second Brigades were not actively engaged in this battle, but held themselves close in reserve. After dark Colonel Walker re- lieved Colonel Este's brigade on the line, and remained in that posi- tion during the night. Colonel Gleason remained in reserve. Both of these brigades sustained slight losses. September 2, the enemy having evacuated Jonesborough during the night and fallen back on the Macon road, our army pursued. The Fourteenth Corps, however, was left behind as the rear guard of the grand army. September 3, it was announced that Atlanta had been evacuated, and our campaign was at an end. In this long, remarkable, and glorious campaign the soldiers of this army have endured fatigues, sufferings, and privations which will never be known or related. The quiet and heroic patience with which all has been undergone, and duty performed, whilst establishing for them the highest repu- tation as soldiers, will still tend to cause their hardships to be for- gotten. Starting without transportation and with only the supplies for an expedition of three or six weeks, these things have been re- quired to last for four months, so that often our officers, lying in the dirt and rain for days without shelter, have been unable to pre- serve the ordinary cleanliness which is essential to health, and many have broken down for want of proper food. During the greater part of the time our men have lain constantly under the enemy's fire, at every moment liable to be picked off, whilst the sound, not of distant artillery and musketry, but of the closely whistling bul- let and bursting shell, has seldom been out of their ears. The rest 48 R IR-VOL XXXVIII, PT I . i1 r i i i. I IiI II i i i i i i I I 1i 1 1 1 Ii I 754 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. which they have experienced by the simple cessation of these noises has been great. Our losses, in the slow operations of the trench, on picket, on daily and nightly skirmishes, as well as in battle, although distributed over a great length of time, yet equal in the aggregate the casualties of the greatest battles. The following report exhibits the total loss of the division in killed and wounded during the cam- paign from the 7th of May to the 7th of September: Killed. Wounded. Missing. Total. i ^ ^ ^ ^ !. c Division staff ................................... 1 ... . I ...... 2 ...... 2 First Brigade ................................ 7 55 15 277 ...... 22 334 356 Second Brigade ........................... 3 23 10 179 ...... 4 13 206 219 Third Brigade .............................. 4 109 31 487 ...... 10 35 606 641 Total infantry .......................... 14 187 57 243 ...... 16 72 1,146 1,216 A rtillery....... ...... ............ .. ...... 9 ...... ..... 9 9 Total of division....................... 14 187 57 252 1 16 72 1,155 1,225 This loss of 1,225 officers and men is to be compared not with the aggregate effective force of 8,460 men with which we entered upon the campaign, but with a much smaller average in the field, as the time of many regiments soon expired, reducing our strength at the end of the campaign to an aggregate of 4,840 officers and men. The following table of effective force, made since the close of the cam- paign, may be profitably compared with that of the 7th of May: Effective force of the Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, September 2, 1864. Command. Officers. Men. Total. First Brigade, Col. M. C. Hunter, 82d Indiana, commanding: Headquarters First Brigade ........................................ 10 60 70 17th Ohio Volunteers, Col. Durbin Ward ........................... 21 417 438 31st Ohio Volunteers, Lieut. Col. F. W. Lister .................... 15 371 386 89th Ohio Volunteers, Col. C. H. Carlton ............................ 9 187 196 92d Ohio Volunteers, Col. B. D. Fearing........................... 16 275 291 82d Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. J. M. Matheny .............. 16 196 212 23d Missouri Volunteers, Col. William P. Robinson............... 24 500 524 Total ................... .......................................... 111 2, 006 2,117 Second Brigade, Col. N. Gleason, 87th Indiana, commanding: Headquarters Second Brigade ..................................... 7 43 50 2d Minnesota Volunteers, Lieut. Col. J. W. Bishop .............. 17 376 393 105th Ohio Volunteers, Lieut. Col. G. T. Perkins ..................... 14 245 259 75th Indiana Volunteers, Maj. C. J. McCole ........................ 17 304 321 87th Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. E. P. Hammond .............. 14 235 249 101st Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. Thomas Doan ............... 17 262 279 Total ............................................................. . 86 1,465 1,551 Third Brigade, Col. George P. Este, 14th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, commanding: Headquarters Third Brigade .............................. ........ 8 56 64 10th Kentucky Volunteers, Col. William H. Hays................... 12 185 197 74th Indiana Volunteers, Maj. Thomas Morgan ..................... 15 242 257 38th Ohio Volunteers, Capt. J. Wagstaff .9 297 306 14th Ohio Volunteers, Lieut. Col. H. D. Kingsbury. 15 333 348 Total ..................................... .. ................... . ... 59 1,113 1,172 Total .. * 59 1,113 1,172 Regiments detached: 10th Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. M. B. Taylor, at Marietta, Ga .. 18 293 311 18th Kentucky Volunteers, Lieut. Col. H. K. Milward, at Ringgold, 22 268 290 Ga. Total detached regiments ........................................ 40 561 601 Total effective force of division .............................296 5,145 5,....441 _~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ..9. ....-..- ----, 44_---.-. CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 755 The division captured during the four months 908 men, including 61 officers. One hundred and forty-seven of these desired to be sent to the rear and classed as deserters, the rest as prisoners of war. It will be seen by this that while the division has not lost in all 20 prisoners, that it has taken from the rebel army, independent of those killed and wounded, almost as many men as it has lost in bat- tle. Some flags have been captured but not all turned over to me. Of material trophies, however, we have obtained little except arms of no great value to our army. This long record would be incom- plete should I fail to mention especially the five officers who, as bri- gade commanders, have been my chief assistants in the campaign- Brig. Gen. J. B. Turchin, one of the most thoroughly educated and scientific soldiers in the country, and a more devoted patriot than most of those born upon our soil, commanded the First Brigade with distinguished ability during the first half of the campaign. He was then, by a failure of health, compelled to resign, thus inflicting a great loss upon the service. Col. F. Van Derveer, Thirty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, the brave and accomplished commander of the Second Brigade at Chickamauga and at Mission Ridge, remained with the command until the end of June. He also has, by expira- tion of service, been returned to civil life. Col. George P. Este, who has commanded the Third Brigade during the campaign; Col. N. Gleason, who has succeeded Colonel Van Derveer in command of the Second Brigade, and Col. M. B. Walker, who has succeeded Brigadier-General Turchin, have all exhibited a high degree of capacity. Their devotion to duty, their bravery in action, and their distinguished services throughout the campaign, merit reward, and I recommend them for promotion or brevets. To the officers of my staff my own thanks and the gratitude of the command are due for the efficient manner in which their duties have been performed, and the promptness with which we have been kept supplied. Those who have remained with me in the field, sharing all the hardships, priva- tions, and dangers of the campaign are deserving of special honora- ble mention. They are-Maj. J. A. Lowrie, assistant adjutant-gen- eral; Maj. J. A. Connolly, One hundred and twenty-third Illinois Volunteers, assistant inspector-general; Capt. John Moulton, Second Minnesota Volunteers, provost-marshal; Capt. E. K. Buttrick, Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers: Capt. John W. Acheson, assistant adjutant-general; Lieut. I. C. Lawyer, Ninety-second Illinois Vol- unteers, aide-de-camp; Lieut. George K. Sanderson, Fifteenth U. S. Infantry, assistant commissary of musters and acting aide-de-camp, and Surg. F. Lloyd, U. S. Volunteers, medical director. I commend these officers to the favorable notice of any commanders with whom they may hereafter serve. Respectfully submitted. A. BAIRD, Brigadier-General, Commanding Divisiono Capt. A. C. MCCLURG, Assistant Adjutant- General. 1 I I I I i i I i I I I I E. W. 756 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. _ _ _ -s~h-+~ra- -B /IBRIO., 3 DIV. COL. GLtASAON. N. 2- BR/t., 3e DI/. - - r . - 5 ...-, 1 .-:--,I7 _,- 7 . 7._1 . _-T t--- l -... > .. -. r v - - _. . w' ID 1 .- ' i. . l. .. i, - r- - 111. - _ .- . W. -. . -- -A _, - ; ., i T- - Killed. Wounded. Missing. Total. Command. l . I I I a IS a I g I a O0 O 0 O0 O 0 First Brigade: 17th Ohio Volunteers .................. . 3 2 3 ............ 2 6 8 31st Ohio Volunteers ................. ................. 7 ...... .......... 7 89th Ohio Volunteers ................... ..... 1 1 ............ 1 2 3 92d Ohio Volunteers . . . ........................ ...... 82d Indiana Volunteers................... 2.. .........4 ...... 4 4 23d Missouri Volunteers ................ 1 2 .... 10 ........... 1 12 13 Total ................................ 1 8 3 24 .......... 4 32 36 Second Brigade: 35th Ohio Volunteers .................... I ............ 13 ........... 1 13 14 105th Ohio Volunteers ............. ............................. 1 1 2 87th Indiana Volunteers . .... ........................ 1 3 ... ...... 1 3 4 101st Indiana Volunteers ............... ............ ...... 2. 2 ......... .... 2 2 75th Indiana Volunteers...................... ....... 1 4 ............ 1 4 5 Total. .......................... ......2... 3 . 4 ..... 4 23 27 Third Brigade: 10th Kentucky Volunteers ..................... 5 2 18 ...... . ..2 23 25 10th Indiana Volunteers ....1 .................3 . . 1 3 13 16 74th Indiana Volunteers............ ...... ...... ...... 6 .. .... .......... 6 6 14th Ohio Volunteers.. ..... ........... . .. 13 ......1 ...... 2 14 16 38th Ohio Volunteers ................... ...... ...... ..... 12 13 Total............................. 7 8 60 ...... 1 8 68 76 Grand total.. ............ ......15 14 ..... 2 1 23 139 A. BAIRD, Brigadier-General, Commanding Division. CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF TIHE CUMBERLAND. 75t7 HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS, September 2,.1864. With regard to the affair of yesterday I can only say at present that the Third Brigade made as gallant a charge as ever was made. It relieved one of Carlin's brigades, which was used up, and passed to the front of it. Then it charged into the woods without any troops either right or left moving with it, and a large interval on the left. It carried two lines of works and took 2 regimental colors and 1 battery flag; likewise 4 cannon. Almost immediately after getting the works, General Morgan, on the right, came forward to the same line, and as Este had to move to the left the guns fell into the hands of General Morgan's troops. I think 600 men, at least, were captured on the front of this brigade, but in falling to the rear many were taken up by officers of regiments lying behind, and we do not have them to report. The brigade went into the fight with about 1,100 men, and lost 75 killed, and 271 wounded, about 50 supposed mortally. I lost many good officers, and all be- haved magnificently. I will give further particulars as soon as pos- sible. This brigade started the movement of the line, which had completely stopped before we came up, and it did actually carry the intrenchments of the enemy with the bayonet, using it all along the line with more freedom than I have ever seen it done. Very many were bayoneted. A. BAIRD, Brigadier- General. Captain McCLURG, Assistant Adjutant-General. ADDENDA. Consolidated report of casualties in the Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, July, 1864. --- 9i " - , sW _" 758 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CeAp. r No. 148. Reports of Col. Moses B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Infantry, com- manding First Brigade. HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., THIRD Div., 14TH ARMY CORPS, Utoy Creek, Ga., August 20, 1864. MAJOR: Early on the morning of the 7th of May this brigade, then commanded by Brig. Gen. John B. Turchin, broke up camp at Ringgold, Ga., and after a hard day's march encamped near Tun- nel Hill, Ga., throwing out a picket guard of one regiment, the Thir- ty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. On the 8th we marched to a position opposite Buzzard Roost Gap. On the 9th, 10th, and 11th the brigade remained in camp in line of battle. On the 12th marched through Snake Creek Gap to a position two miles east, and occupied works previously built by the Army of the Tennessee. On the 13th the brigade moved into position four miles from Resaca. On the morning of the 14th the brigade was moved to a position on the left of the division, connecting on its left with the right of the Army of the Ohio. Skirmishers were immediately thrown out, who engaged the enemy's skirmishers about 200 yards in advance of our line of battle, driving them back to the hills opposite our front, about three-fourths of a mile, the main line advancing at the same time, until the skirmishers had ascended the first line of hills. Here the firing on the skirmish line became brisk and well sustained, our line holding its position, but being unable to advance, owing to the superior strength of the enemy's line. This fact being reported by Capt. W. H Wade, the line was immediately doubled in strength and the enemy's skirmishers driven back to the second line of hills. General Turchin then gave orders to Col. M. B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, to advance the front line of the brigade and occupy the first line of hills. This was immediately done, the second line moving at the same time, with the proper interval. Shortly after the brigade had arrived at the top of the hill it was observed that General Hascall's brigade, of General Judah's division, was moving in a double line of battle to the front, on a line of direction which brought it upon the rear of this brigade. Not understanding the nature of the movement, our lines stood fast until General Hascall's front line had passed our front line and his rear line our rear line. See map: (Hascalls first line.) FIRST LINE. ........................ ..................... ..... .................... (Turchin's first line.) SECOND LINE. (Hascall's second line.) THIRD LINE. (Turchin's second line.) FOURTH LINE. At this time General Baird gave the order that this brigade should advance as General Hascall's brigade advanced, and the troops were immediately ordered forward, advancing in the order they had assumed. The face of the country was very rough, rising and fall- CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 759 ing in a succession of high hills and deep gorges, covered with an almost impenetrably dense growth of timber, rendering it a very difficult matter for troops to advance in line. On reaching the second line of hills we passed our skirmish line, and were struck by the enemy's fire from their line, which had evidently been strengthened into a formidable line. The enemy also opened a heavy fire from artillery. Our lines steadily advanced, driving back the enemy, until we reached the crest of the last line of hills, from which, for the first time, we gained a view of the enemy's intrenched lines. Our advance was here to some extent checked, some of the men in the lines stopping and lying down behind the crests of the hills, but the main portion of the lines rushed down the hill and charged toward the enemy's works, under a most murderous fire of canister and shell from the enemy's batteries, as well as the musketry from their lines. Our lines suddenly found themselves confronted by a deep, narrow stream, with quick- sand in places, and steep, muddy banks. The enemy's sharpshoot- ers were posted here, but fled precipitately back to their works before our men. No assaulting column had been formed. The creek proved a bar to our advance. Our troops sprang into the creek and opened fire on the rebel lines, then within from seventy- five to one hundred yards of the enemy's works. This creek proved a protection to us and a source of great annoyance to the enemy, as we gained an enfilading fire upon one line of his works and quickly drove the troops out of this line. It then appearing that our troops had fallen back from the hills, and the number of men who had gained a protection from the creek and remained there being very small and very much exposed, Col]. M. B. Walker, being the rank- ing officer of the brigade present in the creek, ordered the men to fall back in single file, covering themselves the best way they could from the enemy's fire, at the same time keeping up as rapid a fire as possible from the creek, and making it difficult for the enemy to use his artillery, except from one battery, or to fire from his lines. The Seventeenth Ohio, Thirty-first Ohio, Ninety-second Ohio, and Eighty-second Indiana were in the front line, but both lines ad- vanced to the creek, the officers and men with scarcely a single exception behaving most gallantly. Our lines were quickly re- formed in good order and posted on the first ridge in front of the rebel works. In this charge and affair the brigade lost in killed 2 officers and 14 men, in wounded 7 officers and 112 men. For full particulars I refer to the reports of the regimental commanders. On the 15th the brigade moved to a position in reserve, two and a half miles from Resaca. About 10 p. m. the brigade was ordered to arms by an attack made by the enemy on our front line. During the night the enemy retreated across the Oostenaula River. On the 16th the brigade moved across the river in pursuit of the enemy. Here the Eleventh Ohio Infantry was detached from the brigade and ordered to garrison Resaca. On the 17th the brigade moved through Calhoun to a point three miles north of Adairsville. On the 18th the brigade moved, and encamped for the night four miles north of Kingston. On the 19th marched nine miles, and encamped on the railroad five miles south of Kingston. 20th, 21st, and 22d, remained in camp. On the 22d the Twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry was detached for garrison duty at Kingston. On the 23d crossed the Etowah River at Island Ford and encamped on Euharlee Creek, three miles from Euharlee. On the 24th moved one mile on the r ~ ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~ " " ~ ^ ~ ' _I______ L___ 760 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. Dallas road and returned to camp. 2Sth, remained in camp. 26th, moved to Raccoon Ford, four miles from Burnt Hickory; ordered to return to Kingston to escort a supply train. Returned to Gil- lem's Bridge and encamped; threw out strong picket guards. Early the following morning sent three regiments to bring up trains from Kingston to the bridge; marched with the whole command to Rac- coon Ford, on the Dallas road. 28th, moved through Burnt Hick- ory and encamped on Pumpkin Vine Creek, four miles southeast of Burnt Hickory. 29th, changed camp to a position one mile east of Burnt Hickory, on Pumpkin Vine Creek. 30th and 31st, remained in camp, the weather being very wet and the roads very heavy. June 1, remained in camp, guarding train. 2d, marched two miles and encamped on Starns' Creek, three miles east of Burnt Hickory. 3d and 4th, remained in camp. ath, marched through Burnt Church to Smith's house, eight miles from Acworth. 6th, remained in camp. 7th, marched through Acworth into camp, one mile south. 8th and 9th, remained in camp. On the 8th the Thirty-first Ohio was sent to Cartersville in charge of a supply train. On the 9th the Nineteenth Illinois Infantry was relieved from duty to be mustered out of service, the term of its enlistment having about expired. On the 10th the brigade was relieved from charge of trains and joined the division, taking a position in the line of battle near Big Shanty. On the 11th moved forward to a position one mile west of Pine Hill; at dark changed position about one mile to the left. The Eleventh Ohio relieved from garrison duty and ordered to Cincinnati, Ohio, to be mustered out of service, their term of enlistment having ex- pired. 12th, 13th, and 14th, remained in position. On the 13th the Twenty-fourth Illinois rejoined the brigade, having been relieved from garrison duty at Kingston. On the 15th advanced to the front one mile in line of battle. The Thirty-first Ohio, having been re- lieved from duty with the supply train, rejoined the brigade. On the 16th moved forward half a mile to a new position, in line of battle. On the 17th moved forward in front of enemy's fortifica- tions, occupied by French's division, of Loring's corps. On the 18th made gradual approaches to the enemy's works. 19th, enemy evac- uated his works; brigade moved forward to a position in line of battle one mile west of KIenesaw Mountain. On the 20th remained in position. On the 21st moved to the right three-quarters of a mile, in line of battle. 22d, 23d, and 24th, remained in position. 25th, moved two and a half miles southeast and bivouacked in an open field. 26th, moved into position in line of battle three and a half miles southh.of Kenesaw Mountain. 27th, 28th, and 29th, remained in position. On the 30th took up a position in the line one-quarter of a mile to the right and front. On the 28th the Twenty-fourth Illinois Infantry was relieved from duty and ordered to Springfield, Ill., to be mustered out of service by reason of expiration of term of service. From the 17th to the 30th, inclusive, though not engaged in action, the brigade was constantly exposed by night and day to the enemy's fire, and we had much hot work on the skirmish line. Our lines were constantly in close proximity to the enemy. July 1 and 2, remained in position. On the night of the 2d the enemy evacuated Marietta. On the 3d marched through the suburbs of Marietta, on the Atlanta road, and took up a position four miles south of the town and west of the railroad. On the 4th moved about one-fourth of a mile, and took up a position in reserve. On the 5th moved to a position on the railroad ten miles from Atlanta. 6th, CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 761 7th, 8th, and 9th, remained in position. On the 10th moved to Pace's Ferry, on the Chattahoochee River. The Twenty-third Mis- souri Infantry here joined the brigade. On the 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th, and 16th remained in camp. On the' 15th Brigadier- General Turchin received a leave of absence on account of sickness, and Col. M. B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer In- fantry, assigned to the command by seniority. On the 17th we crossed the Chattahoochee River on pontoons, and encamped in re- serve about one mile from the river. On the 18th advanced about two miles on the Atlanta road. On the 19th advanced to Peach Tree Creek; spent most of the day reconnoitering the enemy's po- sition and skirmishing along the creek until 5 p. m. Was ordered to advance one regiment to the support of General Davis' left; or- dered the Eighty-ninth Ohio, under command of Colonel Carlton, to this duty; half an hour later was directed, if possible, to cross the brigade; sent the Eighty-second Indiana in support of the Eighty-ninth Ohio, under Colonel Hunter. I would fail in my duty were I not to mention the gallant conduct of these two regiments. The enemy had a strong line of skirmishers posted on the opposite side of the stream, well protected by rifle-pits and heavy timber, which skirted the open field on the opposite bank of the stream and commanded every approach to the ford. General Davis' left bri- gade had been brought under a heavy fire on the right of the ford, where a very brisk fight was going on at the time Colonel Carlton led his regiment into the stream. The crossing, from the depth of the water, uneven bottom, and muddy banks, was difficult. Colonel Hunter, ever prompt to obey an order and discharge a duty, had hastened the march of his regiment, so that the head of his column reached the ford before Colonel Carlton's lett was over. Both reg- iments bounded through the stream (which struck the men at the waist) with an alacrity and energy truly surprising. Instantly, on reaching the opposite bank, Colonel Carlton deployed his regiment, charged and drove the enemy from his rifle-pits, Colonel Hunter moving close in support. Capt. W. B. Curtis, assistant adjutant- general and chief of staff, rendered the most efficient service, being personally present to superintend the movement, and won the admi- ration of all who saw him by his daring gallantry. The rest of the brigade, under my own direction, was hastened forward, and the whole command crossed over. The line advanced to the edge of the timber, and works were soon constructed to protect the men. The night which followed was one of great watchfulness and care. The brigade lay exposed, but our works, under the energetic industry of officers and men, soon became too formidable for the enemy to charge, and we remained in position without anything of impor- tance occurring during the night. Our loss in crossing was very small; for exact number I refer to accompanying reports. On the 20th we pressed forward our lines gradually, under a heavy fire from the enemy. 21st, advanced about half a mile with heavy skirmish- ing in front. Sent forward the Thirty-first Ohio to take and occupy a high hill on our front. This was gallantly achieved with light loss. On the 22d we marched toward Atlanta; met the enemy about two and a half miles from the city; formed a line of battle in front of the enemy's works under a sharp fire of artillery and mus- ketry; remained in this position from the 23d to the 31st inclusive, skirmishing with the enemy, and much of the time exposed to an annoying fire from artillery planted upon the works around Atlanta. 62 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L During the time we were in this position two of my regiments, the Twenty-third Missouri and Eighty-second Indiana, deserve honora- ble mention for having each driven the enemy from an advanced position; captured, held, and fortified the same. The loss of the Eighty-second Indiana was trifling in this affair; that of the Twenty- third Missouri more serious. The taking of these two points rendered it an easy matter for the troops on our right (Sixteenth Corps) to gain an advanced position. August I and 2, remained in camp. Early on the morning of the 3d marched to the right of the Army of the Tennessee. Late in the afternoon crossed Utoy Creek under a heavy artillery fre; ad- vanced about three-quarters of a mile upon the enemy, driving back his skirmishers, and taking up a position from 250 to 400 yards in front of the enemy's works. We did not get into position until after dark. The night was very dark and rain fell in great quantities, rendering it very unpleasant for the men to work, but morning found us behind works of sufficient strength to enable us to repel any as- sault the enemy could have made. Such was the nature of our posi- tion here that it became necessary to watch our right flank vigi- lantly, and my brigade was placed in position almost perpendicular to the rear and right of Colonel Gleason's brigade. On the 4th sent the Eighty-second Indiana, Eighty-ninth Ohio, and Twenty- third Missouri, under Colonel Hunter, to support the Second Bri- gade in a reconnaissance; took the enemy's rifle-pits and captured about 30 prisoners. On the 5th advanced our skirmish line and again took the enemy's rifle-pits and captured 56 prisoners out of the works; took up an advanced position, posting the Seventeenth Ohio and Twenty-third Missouri on the right of the Second Brigade; Thirty-first, Eighty-ninth, and Ninety-second Ohio and Eighty- second Indiana on the left of the Third Brigade; advanced our lines a third time to within 200 yards of the enemy's main line. This position has been a very trying one, and our losses in gaining and holding it will be seen to be heavier than in any of our former operations except at Resaca. I have no doubt General Turchin will furnish a report of the operations of the brigade during the time he commanded it. I have, therefore, endeavored to condense this as far as possible, but to report the operations of a single brigade through an entire cam- paign of over 100 days is not a work which can in justice be limited to a very small compass. To speak of the officers and men I must con- fine myself mainly to generalities. Where all have done so well, defying danger and disregarding hardships and privations, it would be almost invidious to point to the merits of a single man. I might occupy much space in individualizing. None, however, can consider themselves neglected where all are approbated. During the time I have commanded the brigade I have had opportunity of proving the composition of my staff. Capt. W. B. Curtis, assistant adju- tant-general; Capt. M. B. W. Harman, acting assistant quarter- master; Capt. James J. Donohoe, acting commissary of subsistance; Capt. E. G. Dudley, provost-marshal; Capt. Edward Grosvenor, in- spector; Capt. A. Whedon, acting aide-de-camp, have each and all discharged their duties in the most commendable manner. I would not neglect the opportunity of acknowledging my obligation to the regimental commanders of the brigade, their gentlemanly and sol- dier-like bearing, their willingness and zeal in the execution of all orders. their dignified deportment before their own commands, their '"'~' ~'~`;.I -- ::----:. - .r~-- .n -,.,,.-.~r ;r;"r- i:-.-- l_---. ia-~. I.'i.- " - m-~.. - -- 1..-------.;-:- -r1.11l.-- ... .";- II'. . I ..~ -.., .1- .`.`.1-- .. -. - .. ---n. CHAP. L.] REFORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 763 unwearied attention to the wants and comforts of their men, their uniform cheerfulness and zealous approbation of everything done by the army, their constantly expressed desire to stop at nothing short of the full accomplishment of the entire object of the cam- paign, all go to place me under a debt of gratitude and to entitle them to the favor of their country. The line officers of the brigade, with but very rare exceptions, have distinguished themselves by their ability, zeal, and gallantry. Owing to the very limited number of line officers serving with the regiments, their labors have been con- stant, unremitting, and arduous. I cannot speak in detail of their good conduct; the limits of my report will not admit. I cannot, how- ever, omit to mention the brilliant gallantry of Capt. Michael Stone, Thirty-first Ohio, who, on the morning of the 5th instant, in charge of the skirmish line, charged the rebel rifle-pits, taking the works and capturing 2 lieutenants and 54 non-commissioned officers and privates. The command has been well supplied throughout the campaign with all necessary quartermaster and commissary stores, Captains Harman and Donohoe being ever vigilant and active in promoting the interests of the brigade. I append a small map* showing the rebel position charged by this brigade on the 14th of May, in front of Resaca, which may not be entirely accurate, being made from a pencil sketch of my own taken under disadvantageous circumstances. I forward herewith reports of the regimental com- manders excepting those of the Nineteenth and Twenty-fourth Illi- nois Volunteer Infantry, which I am unable to obtain, those regi- ments having been mustered out of service. I also forward report of casualties,* all of which are respectfully submitted. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, M. B. WALKER, Colonel, Commanding Brigade. [Maj. JAMES A. LOWRIE :] HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., THIRD DIv., 14TH ARMY CORPS, Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 1864. MIAJOR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my brigade from the 7th day of August to the 8th in- stant, inclusive: On the 7th of August the brigade remained in its old position on the hills southeast of Utoy Creek, holding our advanced lines on the left of the division, as well as the right, having four regiments, the Thirty-first, Eighty-ninth, and Ninety-second Ohio and Eighty- second Indiana on the left, and the Seventeenth Ohio and Twenty- third Missouri on the right. On the 7th I pressed forward my line to a new position about 200 yards from the enemy's works; took up and fortified a line from which we held the enemy close within his lines, compelling him to keep his men constantly covered behind his works. About 100 men of the Eighty-second Indiana were sent forward to fight for this new position, whilst the main line was advanced and the position fortified. Almost one-fourth of this gallant little band (22) were killed or wounded during the day. Each of my other regi- ments, especially the Thirty-first and Seventeenth Ohio, suffered severely whilst we occupied this position. It was here the noble young Ruffner gave up his life for his country. Captains Stone and Barber, of the Thirty-first Ohio, were both wounded here, the latter * Not found. -3r-p1;pmffAP~lXha1 t~4*e . IBSN ggrjsssatP95~b4~~~par t~ '764 'THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CeAP. L. severely in the head. The enemy had laid a firm hold upon the Utoy Hills. On the - of August we challenged his right to hold them by a bold advance, and day after day and night after night, until the 11th, did we hold him in a deadly embrace. At 9 p. m. of the 11th we moved about three-fourths of a mile to the right and relieved a portion of General Morgan's division. This position we held until thenight oth e he nihh. Othe6t. he 19th, before daylight, moved out of our works on the Sandtown road about one-half mile and took up a posi- tion in readiness to support the troops on our right, if necessary; remained until night and returned to our works. On the 20th made a little movement as far as Wallace's place for a similar purpose; reported to Brevet Major-General Davis; relieved General Mor- gan's division, which went forward on a reconnaissance to the right as far as the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad. At 5 p. m. we were relieved by General Davis, and returned to our works and reported to our division commander. From the 20th tothe night of the 26th we remained in our works, being constantly annoyed but not seriously hurt by the enemy's artillery and sharpshooters; occasionally a man was hit. During our stay upon the Utoy Hills we captured about 90 prisoners and received within our lines about the same number of deserters. At 1 a. m. on the morning of the 27th we quit our old works under a heavy fire from the enemy's artillery, and moved about one mile upon the Sandtown road. Here we halted and formed a line of battle, front to the rear, to cover the movement of our trains, General Morgan's division forming on our right. As the trains ad- vanced we fell back, forming line of battle upon three successive positions to cover and protect our trains. The enemy made but a feeble advance, feeling our skirmish line very cautiously. Our line was handled very skillfully, but with boldness, by Captain Grosvenor, brigade inspector. The trains being safely guarded to a place of safety within our new lines, we moved as far as Wallace's house. At 5 p. m. we were ordered forward to report to General Davis; by his order advanced as far as the Widow Holbrook's place and camped for the night in a position to protect the trains then parked near Patterson's. On the 28th marched by a cross-road to Mount Gilead Church; remained with the teams until 10 a. in.; were then ordered by General Thomas to report to our division commander; marched with the division until near night, when we crossed the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad; took up a position about three-fourths of a mile from Red Oak Station. Remained in position on the 29th. On the 30th marched at 6 a. m. by Shoal Creek Church; met the enemy's cavalry in small force and skirmished with it about one mile, to house, killing 1 and capturing 2 of the enemy ; took up a strong position; sent forward the Ninety-second Ohio for picket duty; received reports of the enemy moving in the direction of Jonesborough during the night, and sent the reports to General Baird. About daylight on the morning of the 31st I went out to the picket-line, then half a mile in advance of house. As soon as it became light I saw the enemy's trains moving in the direction of .Rough and Ready on the Jonesborough road; reported the same to General Baird, who ordered Captain Morgan, Seventh Indiana Bat- tery, to report to me with his battery, which I advanced to the skir- mish line, supporting it with my entire brigade; placed the battery in a commanding position; it opened fire upon the enemy's trains, causing much disorder amongst the wagons and driving them from the main road. About 7 a. m. I was visited by Major-General Sher- man and Brigadier-General Baird, who ordered me to send one or two CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 765 good regiments to the front to reconnoiter the [ground] or detect the position of the enemy; sent the Ninety-second Ohio, Colonel Fear- ing, supported by the Seventeenth Ohio, Colonel Ward, with in- structions to go boldly forward at least as far as the Flint River, unless met by an overwhelming force, in which case I would bring forward my entire brigade. These gallant commanders executed my orders with promptness, and in about one hour's time reported that they had gained the opposite bank of the stream, and were repairing a bridge which had been burned by the enemy, and that in one hour's time the artillery and trains could be crossed over. In the mean time our Third Brigade and Colonel Mitchell's bri- gade, of General Carlin's division, had moved forward, and General Baird, commanding in person, with my brigade in advance, followed by Este's and Mitchell's brigades, moved rapidly on as far as the Rough and Ready and Jonesborough road, meeting with no resist- ance from the enemy. The three brigades were placed in line of battle and our position was fortified to command the road. The Atlanta and Macon Railroad now being about two and a half miles to the front, and General Baird being desirous to get his troops on it as soon as possible, ordered me to send out a force of one regiment, to be supported by a like force from Este's brigade, with instructions to push forward, if possible, to the railroad and cut it. I sent the Eighty-ninth Ohio, commanded by Colonel Carlton. This regiment being very small, I allowed Captain Grosvenor, at his earnest re- quest, to go forward upon its left flank with 100 picked men from the Seventeenth Ohio, under Captains Noles and Inskeep. Captain Grosvenor's command and Colonel Carlton's skirmishers appear to have vied with each other in gallantry, and from all the facts I can learn reached the railroad about the same time and commenced the work of destroying it. Colonel Este had sent forward the Seventy-. fifth Indiana, which I am told gallantly co-operated with Colonel Carl- ton in driving back the enemy's cavalry and taking position on the railroad. About night Colonel Carlton, finding that the enemy was bringing forward a considerable force of cavalry against him, deemed it prudent to withdraw his command a short distance from the rail- road, and reported the same to me. I had been very uneasy lest he should be overpowered by numbers, and on learning his condition I obtained permission of General Baird and sent the Eighty-second Indiana and Thirty-first Ohio, under command of Colonel Hunter, to his support. Colonel Hunter now being the ranking officer, assumed command of the entire force, marched upon the railroad, driving back the enemy's cavalry, took up a position, fortified it, and, during the night and succeeding morning, destroyed about one mile of the railroad. I think great praise is due to all the officers and men engaged in this most successful effort to reach and cut the railroad. I would not assert it positively, but from all the facts I have learned Carlton and Grosvenor led the first of our troops who cut the railroad. During the day and night my brigade captured 43 prisoners from the enemy. Captains Curtis and Whedon, of my staff, took a very active and honorable part in the operations of the day and night, rendering Colonel Hunter the most efficient assistance. On the morning of the 1st, by direction of General Baird, I with- drew my troops from the railroad. At 12 m. marched with the other brigades on the Jonesborough road, having detached the Thirty-first Ohio to guard the trains at - Creek; passed the Second Brigade and formed a line of battle; was soon ordered to move to the front, our troops now having engaged the enemy and a brisk fight going 766' THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. on about one mile north of Jonesborough. On coming up I found Moore's brigade, of Carlin's division, and Este's, of ours, about ready to assault the enemy's works; received orders to support their lines; formed my brigade at a double-quick. The assault having com- menced, I received an order from General Baird, through Major Con- nolly, to move farther to the right and support Este if necessary; moved rapidly up within about 150 yards of Este's line and ordered my men to cheer the gallant fellows who were then driving the en- emy from his works. This they did with a will, knowing that their old comrades, with whom they had stood side by side at Perryville, Stone's River, Hoover's Gap, Chickamauga, and Mission Ridge, and all through the great campaign, were in the deadly breach. But it was soon over. The work was done and the Third Brigade immor- talized, and but 12 of my brave men had won the renown of being struck in this most brilliant affair. The enemy's works being car- ried, I relieved Colonel Este's brigade with my front line, and assisted in carrying off his killed and wounded-alas! too many of whom we found upon that bloody field. Groping my way in the darkness to those bloody trenches, stumbling at almost every step over the dead and dying as I placed fresh lines of men in them, in the midst of other thoughts I shuddered that such was the work of my coun- trymen. At midnight, and for an hour later, the air was rent by the explosion of ammunition at Atlanta. At 10 a. m. of the 2d I was ordered to advance toward the town. The enemy had retreated, leaving us to bury their dead and care for their badly wounded. Formed a new line, facing diagonally to the rear; at night took up a new position north of east and about one mile from the town of Jonesborough. On the morning of the 3d discovered five of the en- emy's field hospitals in which were yet remaining over 300 badly wounded men, several surgeons and hospital attendants, and one chaplain. On the 3d, 4th, and 5th remained in camp sending out small foraging parties, who took in all about 25 prisoners. At 12 m. on the 6th marched to a position about one-half mile from the battle- ground. On the 7th, acting as the rear guard, marched to a position one and a half miles from Rough and Ready and encamped for the night. At 4 a. m. on the morning of the 8th took charge of the trains and marched to our present position. The health and spirits of the brigade are good. We claim only to have borne an honorable part in the great campaign. I herewith forward a complete list of casualties,* together with reports of regimental commanders, some of which, I regret to say, are not prepared with as much care as they deserve, but as I wish to apologize for the same deficiency in my own, I ask a like favor to be shown them. Our hearts are all too full of the happy results of our labors, perils, and privations to admit the work of detail or finish. My thanks are due in some measure to every officer under me. I might report the same in this of those who are personally mentioned in my former report. They have added to their deserts by their good conduct throughout the campaign, but words avail but little and I have nothing but good words to bestow, yet I will ever be their witness before the world that they have done their duty. M. B. WALKER, Colonel, Commanding Brigade. Maj. JAMES A. LOWRIE, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Third Division, 14th Army Corps. *Not found. arm _ t_.l-.~.^ * -ark ,>:.:~. T- __ f, ^ ................... _ , ,..*rx . j-~;,-:-.---,- -: .-, 7-. y . -.. s . T ,' ...._ . ._ ,7 .. , a.. .- , ..... n , A r _ rp a t_ r h o _&_ _ _r .. v b - CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 767 No. 149. Reports of Cot. Morton C. Hunter, Eighty-second Indiana Infantry. HDQRS. EIGHTY-SECOND REGT. INDIANA VOL. INFTY., August 17, 1864. CAPTAIN: In pursuance to orders, I herewith transmit to you a general statement of the part taken by my regiment, Eighty-second Indiana, being one of the regiments in said brigade, in the campaign from Ringgold, Ga., to our present position before Atlanta. On the 7th day of May last we started out with the grand army of the Division of the Mississippi, composed of three departments, to wit, the Department of the Cumberland, the Department of the Tennessee, and the Department of the Ohio, to attack the rebel army under command of General Joseph E. Johnston, then occupying the town of Dalton, Ga., strongly intrenched. After some circuitous marches and slight skirmishing with the enemy, on the evening of the 9th of May we arrived in front of Buzzard Roost Gap, some six miles distant from Dalton, which was so strongly fortified that it was deemed imprudent to attempt to take it by storm. On the morning of the 12th we moved with the residue of our corps to a position near Resaca, Ga., by the way of Snake Creek Gap. On the 13th we moved and took position in line of battle to the left of General Johnson's division, of our corps. On the 14th we advanced our lines under a heavy skirmish fire until we reached a point about three- quarters of a mile from the rebel fortifications, which were some two miles north of Resaca. While here General Judah's division, of the Twenty-third Army Corps, which was to the left and partly in our rear, advanced in two lines to attack and storm the rebel works. As the brigade of that division which was in our rear advanced over our lines, our brigade was ordered to follow and support it. The rebel fortifications were in a level valley under a hill, some 150 feet in height and about 400 yards from its base. In our advance we had to pass over the hill and through a dense undergrowth, which entirely obscured from view the rebel works, until we reached the brow of the hill. From there they could be plainly seen. In front of my regiment I had two companies as skirmishers, to wit, A and B, under command of Captain Whedon. As General Judah's troops ad- vanced in front of my regiment, my skirmish line went forward and drove the rebel skirmishers into their works. When General Judah's first line reached a small ravine, some 200 yards from the rebel works, it stopped, and the men took shelter in it from a most murderous fire that was then being poured in upon them from the rebel lines, and commenced returning the fire. The second line being also similarly situated, advanced rapidly, and took shelter in the same ravine as best they could. My regiment, still advancing, had then just arrived at the foot of the hill, where it was exposed to the most terrific fire of shell, grape, canister, and musketry that I have ever experienced. The troops which we were supporting having stopped and taken shelter, I was placed in a most critical condition, as I could not ad- vance to the ravine for shelter, the same being, already full, and having no orders to fall back I ordered my regiment behind a low fence, which was a short distance in our front, as the best protec- tion that presented itself, but the artillery range was so short and the firing so accurate that the fence seemed no shield whatever, as the rails were knocked and scattered over the men by the bursting -I I d.?Ae*9:~et........ ltmgSt 11- , II - I- - - - r- - - 1. ~,:..r..r rt 1r-- -, - f ; i- w-,-- , ~~r - -- , , 't - z ~i. t . I . . I , . I 11 - - -, ~' * - -', - -- r - c- V 1- n- , - , -- -- -,- -7 - , 7415~r -. , --~ -1. ~-:- I 768 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CsAP. L. shells as though they were so many clubs thrown amongst them. As we could do but little good, and being exposed to such a terrible fire, we were ordered by our brigade commander to fall back to the top of the hill, where we took position and threw up works. In this charge my regiment lost in killed and wounded 23 men and officers, which are embraced in the list hereto attached. On the next morning we moved farther to the right and took position on the line. So tightly were we drawing our lines around the enemy that during the night he evacuated his works. The next morning we moved out in pursuit and camped for the night at Resaca, unable to go farther in conse- quence of the bridge across the river at that point being destroyed. From thence we proceeded with the grand army in pursuit of Johns- ton's retreating forces, frequently skirmishing with him, and often forming lines of battle either to advance for the purpose of attack- ing him or receiving an attack from him, until May 24, at which time we were some ten miles beyond the Etowah River, when our brigade was detailed to guard the train, which we continued to do until June 11, when we again joined our corps and moved upon the enemy, who was in a strong fortified position some five miles from Kenesaw Mountain. He soon gave way, and we continued to drive him from one position to another until the 18th, when he again oc- cupied strong works. Here my regiment fortified in a very exposed and dangerous position, but such was our extreme care that we had but 1 man wounded, to wit, Private John Linenweber, Company G, whose name appears in the list hereto attached. When we were once fixed we soon made the rebel works so uncomfortable that they were compelled to abandon them, which they did under the cover of the night. The next morning, the 19th, we pursued them until they entered strong works previously prepared at Kenesaw Mountain, where they again seemingly took root and offered a most stubborn resistance. Here for some twelve days we were exposed to a very heavy fire from shell and musketry, but we fortified with such care that we were protected from all direct shots and only suffered from the stray ones, as we passed from one point to another. The works of both parties all along the line were but a short distance apart, and it was almost instant death for one of either side to expose himself in the least, as sharpshooters were at work all the time. While here our loss was 5 in killed and wounded. Their names ap- pear in the list hereto attached. On the night of July 2 the enemy again gave way and we pressed him so closely that we compelled him to seek shelter in strong works previously prepared on either side of the Chattahoochee River. By degrees we advanced our lines and made his works so untenable that on the 9th of July, under the cover of the night, he withdrew all of his forces on the south side of the river and burned the railroad bridge across the same as he retired. In advancing our lines, Sergt. George W. King, Company A, was killed, and Private Barringer, Company B, wounded. On the afternoon of the 17th we crossed the river and commenced our advance upon Atlanta, meeting with seri- ous resistance in crossing Peach Tree Creek, a small but deep stream with difficult banks. On the evening of the 19th my regiment and the Eighty-ninth Ohio were sent to support the Third Brigade, of Davis' division, of our corps, in forcing a crossing of that creek, which was accomplished after a very severe fight, in which Davis' brigade suffered terribly, but fortunately my regiment escaped almost unharmed, 3 men only being wounded; yet the firing was CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 769 very heavy, but upon my part of the line they mostly overshot us. The names of the wounded appear in the list. The next day was spent in advancing our lines and fortifying. Toward evening heavy fighting was heard on our left. The attack was intended for our corps, but they struck the line too far to our left and encountered Hooker's, Howard's, and one brigade of Johnson's forces, where they got most decently thrashed. On the night of the 21st the enemy again fell back, and on the next morning it was officially stated in camp that Atlanta was evacuated. We moved upon the place with high hopes and firm step, but when within some three miles of there it was ascertained that it was all a ruse of the enemy; that they still held the place, but had so managed as to make some of our superior officers believe that they had left, that they might attack and sur- prise us when carelessly marching into the city. Instead of going farther, we immediately formed our lines and confronted their forti- fications with works equally as strong. On the 24th my regiment was sent to fortify and hold a hill some three-quarters of a mile in our front, which we did under a very heavy picket fire. While in- trenching we lost 1 man killed and 1 wounded; their names appear in the list hereto attached. On the morning of the 31st we moved with our corps to the extreme right of the army, a distance of some six miles, where, after driving back the enemy, we took position in prolongation of the main line and threw up works. On 3d day of August my regiment, Eighty-ninth Ohio, and Twenty-third Missouri, all under my command, were sent out to the front in conjunction with the Second Brigade of our division, on a reconnaissance to ascer- tain the distance to and strength of the enemy's works. The duty was accomplished under heavy fire, and with considerable loss to some of the regiments. In mine but 1 man was hurt, to wit, John H. Sexton, Company H, badly stunned with a shell. On the 5th we were moved to a new position on the front line, and again had to fortify under heavy fire. On this day Morgan Jordan, Company C, was wounded. From the time we left Ringgold to the 6th of this month (when General Palmer, our corps commander was relieved) we have never been out of range of the, enemy's guns. During all that time the men and officers have been exposed to the rain and dust which, under a tropical sun, have been almost beyond the powers of human endurance; yet all believing that they were engaged in the most sacred and just cause upon earth, have marched, worked, and fought without a single murmur. In a general summary, such as I have given, it is an impossibility for me to do my officers and men justice for the labors that they have performed, but suffice it to say that all have done their duty nobly and faithfully, never fal- tering in the hour of peril and danger, for which I return to them my sincere thanks. When we started on the campaign we had 328 effective men and officers; we have lost in killed and wounded up to the 6th of this month, 39.* We had at that date but about 200 men for duty. The loss over and above the 39 were those that became exhausted in the fatigue of the march and were back in hospital sick. Our brigade was commanded from the beginning of the cam- paign to July 15 by Brig. Gen. John B. Turchin, since by Col. Moses B. Walker, Thirty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. For the efficient manner in which they have conducted the manage- * Nominal list (omitted) shows 1 officer and 5 men killed, 2 officers and 31 men wounded. 49 R-- VOL XXXVIII, PT I 770 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. ment of the brigade, and the gallantry displayed by each in the handling of his troops upon the field of danger, I, in behalf of the men and officers of my regiment, return to each their sincerest thanks. Respectfully submitted. MORTON C. HUNTER, Colonel Eighty-second Regt. Indiana Vol. Infty. Capt. W. B. CURTIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. HDQRS. EIGHTY-SECOND REGT. INDIANA VOL. INFTY., Near Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 1864. CAPTAIN: My report up to the 6th of August last, closing with Major-General Palmer's command of said corps, gave a general ac- count of the part taken by my regiment in the great campaign for At- lanta to that date, but as the movements since have been but a con- tinuation of those then in progress, I shall commence where I then left off and give a general summary of the part taken by my command to the present time. On the next day, to wit, August 7, my regiment, still occupying the front line southwest of the city, furnished all the pickets for one brigade, to wit, fifty-five in number, under command of First Lieut. Michael E. Bunger, Company F. On the same day the picket-line was ordered to be advanced, and I was directed to fur- nish fifty additional men from my regiment to support the line, which I did, and sent them out under command of Second Lieuts. E. J. Robinson, Company B, and J. K. McIlhenny, Company D. In advancing the line my men were exposed to a most deadly fire, the enemy being strongly intrenched ihi rifle-pits, but they accom- plished their work without faltering, driving the enemy into his main works. Our loss was heavy, some of our bravest and best men having fallen. The killed and wounded numbered 22; their names appear in the list* hereto attached. On the night of the 11th we moved still farther to the right, where we found the rebels in strong works, but we soon confronted them with those equally as formida- ble. While in that position we made two reconnaissances to the right and front, with two brigades from each division of our corps, for the purpose of ascertaining more thoroughly the position of the enemy, preparatory to making a grand flank movement, which we commenced on the evening of the 26th of August, the whole army moving in conjunction, except the Twentieth Corps, which fell back and occupied the crossings of the Chattahoochee River in strong works, the grand object of our move being to strike the Macon and Atlanta Railroad and sever the enemy's communications. On the evening of the 31st my regiment, with the Thirty-first and Eighty-ninth Ohio and Seventy-fifth Indiana, all under my com- mand, aided by Captains Curtis, Whedon, and Grosvenor, of Col- onel Walker's staff, moved and occupied the railroad at what is known as Morrow's, or Chapman's, Station, which I believe was the first point at which the road was reached. When we advanced the position was held by rebel cavalry, but they soon gave way before our skirmish line, which was under command of Major Jolly, of the Eighty-ninth Ohio. We spent the night in fortifying our position on the road, which was in the form of a square, one regiment being *Nominal list (omitted) shows 3 men killed and 19 men wounded. CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 771 placed on each side. The works were made very strong and would have withstood a heavy and prolonged fight. We remained in pos- session of the road until the next day about 11 o'clock, when we were ordered to join our division. While upon the road we burned one car and tore up and destroyed about one mile of the track. About 1 p. m. of the 1st of September we moved with our corps against the enemy in the direction of Jonesborough. After driving him some two miles, he took shelter in strong works previously pre- pared, where he was attacked by different portions of the corps, the most difficult being that part of the line charged by the Third Bri- gade of our division, supported by our brigade. This charge was one of the most brilliant and successful of the war, as the enemy were driven from strong works and sustained heavier losses than we did. While supporting the Third Brigade in this bloody charge our brigade was sheltered by the position of the ground, and, therefore, we sustained but slight loss, the shots mostly passing over our heads. In my regiment only 2 men were wounded. Their names appear in the list. During that night heavy and continued sounds similar to artillery were heard in the direction of Atlanta, which proved to be the exploding of ammunition, the rebels having evacuated the city. On the next morning it was discovered that the rebels had retreated from our front, leaving us in possession of the field. Thus ended the greatest and most successful movement of the war, which re- sulted in the capture of Atlanta, the great prize of the campaign, and without boasting I feel proud of the part taken by the Four- teenth Corps, and especially that of our division. The campaign lasted four months and one day, the most protracted that the world's history will ever record, and notwithstanding the heat, rain, and dust to which the officers and men have been exposed and the enormous amount of labor performed by them, frequently broken of their rest for several nights in succession, still they appear as healthy and far more cheerful than when the campaign began. I attribute it alone to the fact that they feel that they are engaged in the most sacred cause upon earth-that of preserving their Govern- ment-and that their labors have been crowned with success. In closing, I beg leave to express to all my superior officers the feelings of satisfaction of the officers and men of my command for the able and efficient manner in which the troops have been handled and the campaign conducted, which has resulted in the most brilliant achievement ever won by American arms. All of which is respectfully submitted. MORTON C. HUNTER, Colonel Eighty-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Capt. W. B. CURTIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. No. 150. Reports of Col. William P. Robinson, Twenty-third Missouri In- fantry, of operations July 10-September 8. HDQRS. TWENTY-THIRD MISSOURI VOLUNTEERS, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 21, 1864. CAPTAIN: Agreeably to orders received from Colonel Walker, commanding brigade, I have the honor to report the movements of the Twenty-third Missouri Infantry Volunteers since joining the brigade. I reported with seven companies of my regiment (three 772 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [OHAp. L. companies having been left at McMinnville, Tenn., to garrison that post) to Brigadier-General Turchin, commanding First Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, near Vining's Station, Ga., on the 10th day of July, 1864, and encamped on the north side of the Chattahoochee River. On the 17th we moved with the brigade across the river without opposition. On the 19th crossed Peach Tree Creek under a heavy fire from the rebel skirmishers and threw up earth-works. On the 20th moved forward again to obtain a more suitable position on the right of the brigade. On the 26th three companies of my regiment arrived from McMinnville, Tenn. On the 28th were ordered to advance the skirmish lines, which was done under a heavy, enfilading fire. On the 7th of August Com- panies D and E and a portion of F, on the skirmish line, were ordered to advance. A severe engagement ensued with the enemy's skirmishers, driving them to their main works, but [we] were forced to retire. During the night the regiment advanced and threw up a line of works. On the 12th we were relieved from the front line of works and placed in reserve. Have remained in camp with the ex- ception of the 19th and 20th, when we were out on a reconnaissance with the brigade.* W. P. ROBINSON, Colonel, Commanding Regiment. [Capt. W. B. CURTIS, Assistant Adjutant-General.] HDQRS. TWENTY-THIRD MISSOURI VOLUNTEER INFTY., Near Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 1864. CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part performed by the Twenty-third Missouri Volunteer Infantry in the campaign just closed, from the 6th of August last to the present date: On the 6th of August the regiment remained in camp northwest of Atlanta in the second line of works, the Seventeenth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry occupying the first line in our immediate front. August 7, advanced my line about 150 yards in front of the Seven- teenth Ohio and built breast-works, my skirmishers meeting with an obstinate resistance by the enemy's pickets, who finally unwill- ingly withdrew to their first line of rifle-pits. August 8, 9, and 10, remained in camp; skirmish firing almost constantly, with occasional shelling. August 11, our lines being extended to the right, my reg- iment was placed in reserve in the second line of works. August 27, nothing worthy of notice has occurred with the regiment from the 11th instant until to-day; it moved with the brigade about four miles to the right. August 28, marched about three and a half miles southeast toward the Montgomery railroad, crossing the same about four miles below East Point. August 29, remained in camp. August 30, marched about eight miles southeast and built breast- works. August 31, marched about three-quarters of a mile and threw up works. In the evening of the same day advanced about two miles and again built breast-works. September 1, marched southeast about six miles, when the regi- ment was formed in the second line of battle, the Seventeenth Ohio on the right. A portion of the Third Brigade, Third Division, being *Nominal list of casualties accompanying this report shows 1 officer and 2 men killed and 25 men wounded, CHaP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 773 in the first line were hotly engaged with the enemy in our immediate front, but having succeeded in taking the enemy's works by assault, capturing and dispersing the enemy, this regiment took no part in the 'battle. September 2, marched southeast about one and a half miles, crossing the Macon railroad near Jonesborough. September 6, re- mained in camp until to-day, when the regiment marched with the brigade on the Atlanta road about two miles, and was placed in the rear as a support to the skirmish line. September 7, marched about nine miles and went into camp near Rough and Ready. September 8, marched about seven miles to our present position, one and a half miles southeast of Atlanta. I am proud to be able to state that the officers and men of this regiment, without a single exception, have borne the hardships and fatigues of the campaign without a murmur, never shunning danger where duty called, but always manifesting a willingness truly commendable to do their duty wherever placed. More than 250 men of this regiment having served over three years from date of enlistment, fears were expressed that they would not willingly join in the charge upon the enemy, as their term of service had already expired, but all doubts on this point were dispelled in the affair of the 1st instant, as at one time it was supposed our line would have to move up to the -support of the troops engaged with the enemy in our front, and when the command to advance was given, they marched forward with an unwavering firmness and deter- mination only known to brave men.* I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. P. ROBINSON, Colonel, Comdg. Twenty-third Missouri Infty. Vols. Capt. W. B. CuRTIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. No. 151. Report of Lieut. Col. Ogden Street, Eleventh Ohio Infantry, of oper- ations May 7-30. HDQRS. ELEVENTH REGIMENT OHIO VOL. INFANTRY, Resaca, Ga., May 30, 1864. SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my regiment during the late movement from Ringgold, Ga., and action near this place: The regiment moved with the brigade from Ringgold on the morn- ing of 4he 7th instant and bivouacked near Tunnel Hill same even- ing. On the 8th and 9th moved to the right and front with the brigade to a point near Mill Creek Gap. On the evening of the 9th the regiment was ordered out to build a bridge across Mill Creek, near the gap, and construct a road for getting artillery in position at the gap. The work was completed at 2 a. m. of the 10th, when I re- turned to the brigade with a loss of 2 men wounded. Remained in bivouac until the morning of the 12th, when I moved with the bri- gade south and to the east side of Rocky Face Ridge, through Snake Creek Gap, bivouacking near the east end of the gap. On the 13th the regiment with the brigade took position in front of the enemy, west of the railroad, north of and about two and a half miles from Resaca. Changed position on the morning of the 14th to a point ' Nominal list of casualties accompanying this report shows 8 men killed and 1 officer and 7 men wounded. 774 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. about one-half a mile north of the position occupied the evening previous. The brigade being formed in two lines, my regiment was the third from the right of the second line, and in the rear of the Eighty-second Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry. At about 12.30 p. m. an advance was made by the Twenty-third Army Corps, when the brigade moved forward in support, I being ordered to follow the Eighty-second Regiment Indiana Volunteers. After hav- ing moved about half a mile the fire from the enemy became severe, when I deployed my column, having been formed in double column at half distance. Owing to the dense undergrowth the Eighty- second Indiana became lost to sight during this movement. My regi- ment having been deployed, moved forward on the double-quick, and in descending a precipitous hill in front of the enemy's works, became mixed with the Eighty-second Indiana and some regiments of the Twenty-third Army Corps. Finding my regiment disorgan- ized by this mixture, I withdrew to the top of the hill, as soon as I saw that no further advance was being made by the troops origi- nally in my front, where I reformed and was preparing to move for- ward to the point from which I had withdrawn, when I was ordered by Lieutenant-Colonel Grosvenor, aide-de-camp, to report my regi- ment to the crest of the hill, a few hundred yards to the right, at which point I remained until dark, when the brigade was moved to the rear. On the morning of the 15th the brigade was moved to the right about one mile, where it remained in bivouac until the morn- ing of the 16th, when moved to this place, where my regiment has since been stationed. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, OGDEN STREET, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding. Capt. W. B. CURTIS, Assistant Adjutant- General. No. 152. Reports of Col. Durbin Ward, Seventeenth Ohio Infantry. HDQRS. SEVENTEENTH REGT. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY., Atlanta, Ga., August 17, 1864. SIR: In obedience to your verbal order to me of the 15th instant, I have the honor to report the military operations of my command since it left Ringgold, Ga., up to the 6th instant. On the 7th day of May last I was ordered to move, and did move, from camp into the active campaign, in which we are still engaged, leaving behind me, under orders, most of the regimental baggage. On that day we reached the neighborhood of Tunnel Town, and on the next moved in front of Buzzard Roost, where it was found the enemy was strongly posted. Skirmishing continued all day actively and for several days afterward. On the 12th we moved off to the right, passing through Snake Gap and gaining the rear of Dalton. Orn the 13th we groped slowly and cautiously, mostly through dense woods, the skirmishing still continuing all day and most of the night. During the morning of the 14th we skirmished our way to the front of the enemy's breast-works on Camp Creek, in the neighborhood of Resaca, on the Dalton and Atlanta Railroad. At about 1 o'clock on *Nominal list of casualties accompanying this report shows 2 officers and 18 men wounded at Resaca. CHAP. L.] REPORTS ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 775 this day an assault was made on the enemy's works along much of the line. I was ordered by General Turchin, then in command of the brigade, to allow Hascall's brigade, in Judah's division, of the Twenty-third Corps, already formed in two lines of battle in our rear, to move over us to the assault, and I was ordered to take com- mand of my own and the Twenty-fourth Illinois Regiment, and sustain the charge as though supporting our own division. Has- call had one deployed line and one in column. My line was de- ployed and the Twenty-fourth Illinois was in column to my rear. It was from half to three-quarters of a mile to the enemy's works. We had to move through dense woods and underbrush and up quite a steep hill till we reached the brow of the hill skirting Camp Creek. We had heavy skirmish lines thrown out, and as we advanced the enemy's skirmishers were driven into their works. Judah's division moved impetuously to the charge, and we had to follow at rapid pace. Our advance was assailed by artillery fire, which, however, did us little harm until we reached the brow of the hill. By the time the men reached that they were exhausted by fatigue. The brush was almost impassable. On starting up the hill I had been ordered to close my line into column. I perceived on reaching the top that Judah's division did not halt under cover of the hill to rest the men and organize the attack, but were pressing over into the open ground near the creek, and right under the guns of the enemy. Un- derstanding my orders required me to follow, I moved on at sup- porting distance, having first deployed my front line. On emerging. into the open field I found we were under a murderous fire of artil- lery and infantry at from 300 to 400 yards distance. Judah's lines were giving way to the left, and most of them retiring from the attack. Putting my men into double-quick we moved to the creek, were we were sheltered to some extent by a fringe of under- brush and trees, as well as the depression of the ground. Here I perceived that we were almost entirely unsupported, for we had become, by the retirement of Judah, the front. Some of his men had taken refuge in the low ground on my left, and some of our own brigade were in on my right. I found it impossible to advance, and retained my position in the ravine for an hour and ten minutes. I sent back to advise the brigade commander of my position, but the woods were so dense that for a long time he could not be found. In the mean time, through an aide, General Judah had sent word he meant to renew the assault. At last General Turchin was found, and he ordered me to withdraw into the woods behind the crest of the hill. This we did as cautiously as possible and in tolerably good order. Our position had been within about 200 yards of the enemy's works, but it was impossible to advance farther unless sustained by a whole line of attack. My regiment lost in killed and wounded 32, as will be hereafter stated in detail. Though afterward, under straggling fire, we were not again seriously involved during the engagement. On the 16th, the enemy having abandoned his works and crossed the Oostenaula, we joined in the pursuit, marching by the way of Calhoun and Adairsville to Kingston, where we arrived May 19, but passing through we took position several miles to the left, near Cartersville, where we remained till the 23d. The enemy disputed our advance all the way. On the morning of the 23d our march was renewed, and we crossed Etowah River and continued to advance toward Burnt Hickory till the 26th, when we were, with the rest of the brigade, sent back to Kingston to guard a wagon train. We continued upon this duty till 776 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. the 7th of June, when we reached Acworth and were relieved. On the morning of the 10th we joined the march to the front and ad- vanced toward Marietta. We continued to advance as the enemy was pushed back by our column, my regiment being only in occa- sional skirmishing, until the 18th, in the neighborhood of Kenesaw Mountain. On that day, under a drenching rain, we groped through the woods and advanced, in connection with the rest of the line, upon -the enemy's works. Having reached the edge of a field some 300 or 400 yards distant, we halted, poured a deadly fire upon the enemy, compelling the infantry to keep behind their breast-works and almost silencing the artillery, while we, under the point-blank range of their guns, dug rifle-pits in the open field. The fight lasted all day, but my regiment lost only 11 men in killed and wounded; but so effectual was the assault of our army that during the night the enemy abandoned his works and moved nearer the mountain. Our lines followed, and from this time till the evacuation of Kenesaw, though constantly involved in heavy skirmishing, there is no need to detail the monotonous operations of my regiment. On the 3d of July the enemy evacuated Kenesaw and fell back to the Chattahoochee, to which place our army immediately followed. Heavy skirmishing, but no regular combat, took place; one corps after another crossed the river, my regiment crossing with its bri- gade on the 17th of July. We skirmished slowly and steadily toward Atlanta, being always under fire, but not involved (except slightly on the 20th) in any of the heavy engagements around the city. The most notable of our combats occurred on the 5th of August, when we were ordered to support the skirmish line while we threw for- ward our intrenchments nearer the enemy's works. We were sub- jected to the heaviest shelling we have endured during the campaign, though, fortunately, our caution in throwing up the works saved us very heavy loss. This report is, perhaps, already too much in detail. I refer with great pride to the general bravery, coolness, good con- duct, and skill of my officers and men. Though one of the most laborious, aswell as brilliant, campaigns of the war, they have for more than 100 days dared and endured all the dangers and hardships, glories, and privations of the sternest war, with disciplined obedi- ence, and, at the same time, enthusiastic courage. To all, officers and men, I gratefully acknowledge the devotion and kindness shown me personally, painfully suffering as I have been from my old wound. Deeply as I regret the fall of my comrades in arms to the humblest, I cannot refrain from making special mention of First Lieut. Lyman W. Barnes. He was a brave soldier who had risen from the ranks. In the dark hour of Chickamauga I saw him in the thickest of the fight till I fell, and after that he stood by the colors till the last moment. He was a brave and efficient officer, and he died as a gallant soldier dies. DURBIN WARD, Colonel, Commanding. Capt. W. B. CURTIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. Appendix.--The effective force of the regiment when it left Ring- gold was 544; it is now 413; loss, 131. Of these 66 have been killed or wounded in action, and 65 have left the ranks from death, sick- ness, details, and other causes.* * Nominal list shows 2 officers and 12 men killed, and 1 officer and 51 men wounded. CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 77'7 HDQRS. SEVENTEENTH REGT. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY., Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864. SIR: In obedience to verbal orders from brigade headquarters of yesterday, I have the honor to report the operations of my command since my report of the 6th of August last. On the 8th of August last I was ordered to the left of the position I then occupied into some field-works which had been previously constructed. We were in very close proximity to the enemy, and my adjutant was shot dead in my tent. On the 11th we were moved still farther to the right than we had yet been, and there remained within 150 yards of the enemy's line until the 27th day of August. On that day my regiment moved in common with the corps to the right, taking part in the general movement upon Jonesborough. We continued to move, as ordered, cautiously to the right till the 31st of August, when we attained close proximity to the enemy. On that day my regiment supported the Ninety-second Ohio, and skirmishing forward in advance of the general line, the two regi- ments moved across the headwaters of Flint River and took posses- sion of the Atlanta and Jonesborough road before noon, near Sea- born Smith's house. Subsequently the rest of the division came up. We executed this movement with little opposition. In the afternoon Captain Grosvenor, assistant inspector-general of the brigade, asked me for a detail of 100 men and 3 officers to make a scout toward the Atlanta and Macon Railroad. This detail was furnished, Captains Noles and Inskeep accompanying it, and Adjt. Augustus Ward as a mere volunteer. This daring party pushed three miles beyond the general line, and during the afternoon driving off a small body of cavalry, were the first to seize and hold the railroad till re-en- forcements could be sent. On the next morning, September 1 instant, my regiment moved with the rest of the corps upon Jones- borough, and were in reserve supporting Este's brigade in the brilliant charge of that day. We were advanced to within a little over 200 yards of the enemy's works, but they being carried in our immediate front by the impetuous charge of Este, we did not become actively engaged. We were constantly under fire from musketry and artillery, but being somewhat sheltered by the ground, we had no casualties except that First Lieut. Edward M. Champlin and 1 private were wounded. As I have ever had to report, my men bore themselves gallantly, and without claiming credit for anything brilliant, I can proudly say they did, as they always do, their duty. I cannot omit the honorable mention of the lamented Adjt. J. M. Ruffner, who met his untimely fate on the 9th of August. He was the soul of true manhood and amongst the "bravest of the brave." To all my subordinates in command I am under many obligations for efficient aid in the arduous campaign through which we have just passed.* Respectfully submitted. DURBIN WARD, Colonel, Commanding. Capt. W. B. CURTIs, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. *Nominal list of casualties accompanying this report shows 1 officer and 1 man killed and 9 men wounded. r- 778 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CP. L. No. 153. Reports of Lieut. Col. Frederick W. Lister, Thirty-first Ohio In- fantry. HDQRS. THIRTY-FIRST OHIO VET. VOL. INFANTRY, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 17, 1864. CAPTAIN: In compliance with orders from the colonel command- ing the brigade, the subjoined report of the part taken by the Thirty- first Ohio Veteran Volunteers during the campaign commencing May 7 up to the 5th instant is respectfully submitted. As the regi- ment was commanded by Col. M. B. Walker for the greater part of the time for which the report is required, I am unable to furnish more than a mere outline of operations. The regiment marched from Ringgold on the 7th of May and was ordered on picket in the vicinity of Tunnel Hill. On the 8th ar- rived in front of Buzzard Roost Gap and remained in position until the 12th, when it marched to Snake Creek Gap, some miles east of its former position. On the 14th the regiment was deployed on the right of the front line of the brigade, and, being ordered to send out skirmishers, details of veterans from each company, under command of Capt. W. H. Wade, were advanced onto a ridge in front of the open field, then occupied by the brigade. The skir- mishers were soon engaged, and soon after the whole line was ordered to advance. Upon reaching the crest of the second ridge a line of troops, said to belong to Hascall's brigade, of Judah's division, Army of the Ohio, advanced from the woods in our rear, and passing our front line, advanced some paces in its front. The regiment being then ordered forward, upon reaching the crest of a third ridge, it was exposed to a heavy fire of artillery from bat- teries planted upon hills on the opposite side of a valley and distant about 500 yards. The word being still "forward," the regiment rushed down a nearly precipitous declivity and advanced to the edge of a creek, over which the front line had already struggled. The enemy here opened with musketry and two batteries, but the regiment gallantly dashed into the creek and was emerging from it when the first line (Hascall's troops), unable to maintain their advance under so murderous a fire, fell back, and a portion of it passed through and over the right wing of the regiment, which was not protected by the banks of the creek, which on the left were high and the water deep. A portion of the regiment regained the ridge and there reformed. The remainder were, by order of the colonel commanding, engaged in keeping up a fire on the enemy's works, under cover of which the men retired singly or in small squads and rejoined that portion of the brigade which had been halted on the ridge. After remaining in support of batteries which were then brought up to the front until the following morning the brigade was moved to position on the right and in reserve, and re- mained there until the occupation of Resaca by the army. On the 16th crossed the Oostenaula River, passing through Calhoun toward Adairsville. Marched on the 17th and 18th. On 19th encamped four miles from Kingston. On the 23d forded the Etowah River. On the 26th were ordered to escort train to Kingston. Returned with it to Burnt Hickory on the 29th and encamped on Pumpkin Vine Creek. Guarded the trains of Fourteenth Corps until the 1st of June, when the regiment marched to a position three miles from Burnt Hickory. On the 5th camped eight miles from Acworth. On the 8th the regiment was detached from the brigade and sent as _l_____________ l~~~~~r__T_ ___ __II_ _~~- . 1. 'LHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 779 escort to Cartersville. On the 15th rejoined the brigade, which was then in position in line. On the night of the 16th six companies were ordered to build works for a battery on the skirmish line, which were executed by daylight. On the 18th moved up to within 200 yards of the enemy's works and sent out 100 men as skirmishers, who, in conjunction with details from other regiments, ultimately drove the enemy from their works. On the 19th moved through the enemy's abandoned position and formed in front of Kenesaw Mountain. Skirmishers being ordered to the front, two companies, under the command of Captains Wade and Stone, advanced to the edge of a piece of woods and soon became engaged with the enemy's skirmishers. The regiment was ordered to support them, and four companies were advanced to the edge of an open field, in which the deployed line had been very imprudently halted by an officer and the inspector of the Second Brigade. So dangerous did their posi- tion become that it was only by the personal gallantry of Captain Stone that his men could be supplied with ammunition. It was not deemed prudent to relieve the company until after dark. On the 20th camped in the second line of the brigade. On the night of the 22d was placed in the front line, where it remained under a perpet- ual fire until the 26th, when it marched to a position on the right of the corps and bivouacked for'the night. On the 27th formed at the base of a hill under a very heavy fire of artillery, under which it ascended the hill and was ordered behind works constructed by the Twentieth Corps. Remained there until the 30th; was then ad- vanced to relieve General Geary's division. Remained there until the 3d of July, when, Marietta having been evacuated, the brigade moved forward and took up a position south of the town. On the 5th fortified strongly on the railroad about ten miles from Atlanta. On the 9th advanced a quarter of a mile and fortified strongly. On the 10th marched to Pace's Ferry, on the Chattahoo- chee River; remained in camp until the 17th; crossed the river on pontoons and camped in reserve. On the 19th was ordered out, "stripped for action;" advanced on Peach Tree Creek and recon- noitered for a crossing; in the evening was ordered to cross the creek, following the Eighty-ninth Ohio and Eighty-second Indiana; crossed without loss and fortified during the night. On the 20th advanced to the crest of the hill, and on the 21st the regiment was ordered to ascertain the position and strength of the enemy. Com- panies K and G, under the command of Captains Wade and Stone (who, although acting as field officers, gallantly led their own com- panies), were ordered forward as skirmishers, and soon developed the enemy's position. Companies F, Lieutenant Carlile, and H, Captain Wilkin, were ordered forward in support. Several casualties oc- curred during this reconnaissance, and the regiment was relieved by the Twenty-third Missouri. On the 22d moved forward on Atlanta and formed in line opposite some heavy works in front of the city; fortified in the third line of the brigade. On the 24th was detached with Eighty-ninth Ohio, Colonel Carlton commanding, in support of General King's brigade, of Johnson's division; constructed works on the second line, and had orders to re-enforce any attacked point; was exposed to heavy artillery fire from the 23d to the 30th, the 64 - and 20 pounders having a perfect range on the camp. On the 3d of August marched to the right- of the Army of the Tennessee; in the evening crossed Utoy Creek; advanced through thick brush and woods, and at night-fall commenced fortifying; completed works by daylight. On the 4th moved in support of a portion of .re2i~s~a~Wivf~F4 .-lbBn-~F ra r 780 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. rHAP. L. the brigade; ordered to advance skirmish line; returned to former position at night. On the morning of the 5th, the skirmish line being ordered to advance and endeavor to capture the enemy's rifle-pits, was strengthened to 150 men. Captain Stone, brigade officer of the day, having arranged a plan of attack, moved forward his line until within 100 yards of the enemy, and, at the bugle-call, in conjunction with the skirmishers of the other brigades of the Third Division, dashed into the rifle-pits and captured nearly the enemy's entire line. The detail from the regiment brought in 2 commissioned officers and 54 enlisted men, with a loss of but 1 killed and 3 wounded, a result mainly owing to the skill, coolness, and, when necessary, daring bravery of the officer in charge of the line. I am happy to be able to express my satisfaction with the regiment during the time I have had the honor to command it. Recruits have vied with veterans in uncomplaining endurance of the priva- tions of this trying campaign, and have in most cases emulated them on the battle-field. I have to deplore the loss of Captain Cahill, who was instantly killed by a sharpshooter on the 23d of June. The service has lost a fine officer and his comrades a courteous gentle- man and true friend. I cannot close without making mention of the services of Captains Wade and Stone, respectively acting lieu- tenant-colonel and major. Ever ready in time of danger, their skill, coolness, and courage render them valuable officers upon all occa- sions when those qualities are most wanting. Accompanying will be found a list of casualties* during the campaign to the 5th instant. I am, captain, respectfully, your obedient servant, F. W. LISTER, Lieut. Col., Comdg. Thirty-first Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty. Capt. W. B. CURTIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. HDQRS. THIRTY-FIRST OHIO VET. VOL. INFANTRY, Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864. CAPTAIN: In compliance with orders from brigade headquar- ters, I beg to submit the following supplemental report of the operations in which my regiment took part from the 5th ultimo to the close of the campaign. August 6, regiment took up position on the right of First Division in the second line. 7th, was ordered to form on the right of First Division in advanced position, and fortified during the night. The position was one of great danger, and several valuable lives were lost and many men wounded before the regiment was relieved from the line. During the night the enemy came out of their works to attack, but were soon driven back. Remained in first works until the night of the 11th, when regiment occupied works built by part of Second Division. Remained in that position until the evening of the 26th. During this interval of comparative quiet the men benefited by the rest; the enemy shell the camps occasionally, but do no injury; picket-firing almost entirely ceased, and desertions from the enemy were numerous. At 7 p. m. received orders to march at any moment. The enemy having intimation of the movement open fire upon us with shell and case-shot, throwing them with great accuracy, but the men, being well protected, were unhurt. Marched at 3 a. m. August * Reports 1 officer and 8 men killed and 1 officer and 51 men wounded. CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 781 27; camped as guard to the train. 28th, rejoined division; cross West Point railroad, and camp in rear of Second Brigade. 30th, marched at 7 a. m. and took up position about three miles from Flint Creek; threw up works. 31st, advanced a mile; threw up works; at 1 p. m. cross Flint River and threw, up works in woods in view of roads on which enemy's columns were passing; at 6 p. m. the regi- ment, with the Eighty-second Indiana, move out on the railroad to Morrow's Station, to re-enforce Eighty-ninth Ohio; build works dur- ing the night on the railroad and prepare to hold them against any force; the energy displayed by both officers and men in construct- ing works, and general soldierly bearing of the entire command, was praiseworthy in the highest degree. At 10 a m. on the 1st of September ordered to abandon the works and rejoin the brigade, and at 3 p. m. march in rear of the division as guard to hospital train; encamped three miles from railroad as guard to hospitals. Rejoin the brigade at 10 a. m. on the 2d and take position near railroad and about one mile from Jonesborough. Remained until the 6th, when the command marched as rear guard on its return toward Atlanta. The regiment has, during this cam- paign, had to contend with many difficulties. The short time which elapsed between the reorganization of the Thirty-first Ohio Volun- teers and the commencement of the campaign gave but little oppor- tunity to drill and discipline the recruits; nevertheless they have vied with the veterans in endurance and gallantry, and give great promise for the future. The casualties extending over the whole period of active operations fully equal those of a general engage- ment. I have in my previous report made mention of such officers as distinguished themselves, and with one solitary exception, already reported, the line officers have sustained their former reputations. Assistant Surgeons Varney and Chapel have labored faithfully whilst with the regiment. * I have the honor to be, captain, respectfully, your obedient servant, F. W. LISTER, Lieut. Col., Comdg. Thirty-first Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty. Capt. W. B. CURTIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. No. 154. Report of Maj. John H. Jolly, Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry, of op- erations May 7-June 1. HDQRS. EIGHTY-NINTH REGIMENT OHIO INFANTRY, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 16, 1864. SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Eighty-ninth Regiment Ohio Infantry in the present campaign, from the 7th day of May, 1864, to the 1st day of June, 1864, during which time the regiment was under my command: The Eighty-ninth Regiment Ohio Infantry marched from Ring- gold, Ga., on the 7th of May, 1864, and bivouacked near Tunnel Hill, Ga., for the night. Resumed the march on the day following, shifting to the right near one mile; halted, stacked arms, and rested for the night. On the 9th we moved about the same distance to the right, stacked arms, and rested till evening, when orders were given * Nominal list of casualties accompanying this report shows 3 men killed and a officers and 13 men wounded. r 782 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. to march to the front; which done, we bivouacked for the night; slight skirmishing was heard on our front. Our position was not changed until the 12th, when we moved for Snake Creek Gap, passed through it at dark, and bivouacked for the night. On the 13th we marched all day, and got into position at 8 p. m. to the left and near Resaca, Ga.; here wo lay on our arms during the night. We changed position on the 14th; moved to the front; threw out skirmishers, who engaged and drove the enemy's skirmishers a short distance. Our line was halted, the right of the Twenty-third Army Corps passing to our front, engaging the enemy from 12 m. till dark, during which time we lay in support of their right, under fire, but not engaged; lay on arms during the night. We were relieved on the 15th, and moved a short distance to the right; halted and rested till the 16th. The enemy having evacuated during the night, we moved in pursuit toward Resaca, near which we bivouacked for the night. We resumed our march on the 17th, taking the railroad toward Atlanta; passed through Calhoun in the afternoon, moving beyond toward Adairsville five miles; halted and rested for the night. Took up our line of march on the 18th, passing through the village of Adairsville, following the Atlanta railroad till 10 p. m.; stacked arms and spent the balance of the night in sleep. Marched at 9 a. m. on the 19th for Kingston, Ga.; passed through town at noon and formed line of battle; no enemy appearing, we crossed the creek in our front, moving upon the hill south a short distance; formed line of battle, threw out skirmishers, and, after two hours' delay, recalled them; moved by the left flank toward Cassville, where firing was heard, with slight skirmishing in front. We halted, put out skirmishers, and threw up temporary breast-works, where we remained during the night and until the 23d. We then marched for a ford of the Etowah River, which we waded; by 2 p. m. all were over and on our march. We halted at 9 p. m. and biv- ouacked for the night. At 10 o'clock on the 24th we moved to the right a couple of miles, halted an hour, countermarched the same road a short distance and went into camp, where we remained till the morning of the 26th. We then moved at 7.30 a. m., and moved south six miles and halted on Pumpkin Vine Creek; after an hour's rest we moved as train guards back toward Kingston; crossed Euharlee Creek at Euharlee Mills; continuing our march, crossed the Etowah River at the bridge; we halted and bivouacked for the night, where we remained till the train arrived from Kings- ton, going front at 7 o'clock on the 27th; we returned with it, re- crossing the Etowah and Euharlee Creek at the same points; after marching twelve miles we halted and bivouacked for the night near Pumpkin Vine Creek. On the morning of the 28th we moved for Burnt Hickory, which we reached at noon. After resting an hour, we moved toward Dallas and camped for the night in a little valley two miles from Burnt Hickory. On the 29th we received orders to march with our division. We moved eastward several miles, halting on a high hill. After resting a short time we moved back, taking position northwest of our train, throwing out pickets, and went into camp, where we remained till June 1, when Colonel Carlton, of the Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry, relieved me of its (Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry) command. J. H. JOLLY, CMajor Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry. Capt. W d. B CURTIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. CHAP. L.) REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 783 No. 155. Reports of Col. Caleb H. Carlton, Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry, of operations June 1-September 8. IHDQRS. EIGHTY-NINTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, August 18, 1864. SIR: I have the honor to transmit the following report of the movements of the Eighty-ninth Ohio from June I to August 6, 1864: June 1, the regiment formed part of the guard for the department ammunition train. June 2, moved about two miles on the road to Pumpkin Vine Creek ; bivouacked for the night. 3d, moved about two miles; crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek and bivouacked. June 5, moved about three miles; bivouacked near Burnt Church. June 7, moved eastward; cross railroad; pass through Acworth; bivouacked one and a half miles south of Acworth. June 10, regiment and bri- gade relieved from train guard; moved five miles on Marietta road; join our division. June 11, moved one mile to the left; bivouacked at midnight. June 12. move one-half mile to the left; halt in re- serve line; heavy skirmishing in front; bivouacked for night. June 17, moved to the left toward Kenesaw; throw up works. June 18, advanced within a few hundred yards of the rebel works, having moved three-fourths of a mile; put up works. June 19, enemy hav- ing evacuated in the night, we move forward one and a half miles; bivouacked in second line for the night near Kenesaw. June 20, regiment on skirmish line; heavy firing all day. June 21, relieved from skirmish line and take position in first line of works. June 22, moved at dark short distance to the right; took up position in second line of works. June 26, moved at dark one and a half miles to the right; bivouacked for the night. June 27, moved to the right three-fourths of a mile from line, and rest on arms; enemy shelling furiously; bivouacked for the night. June 30, moved at dark to the right and front one-half mile, and relieve a portion of General Hooker's troops; bivouacked behind the works. July 2, greater part of the regiment went on skirmish line. July 3, rebels evacuated Kenesaw in the night; we moved toward Mari- etta, striking the Atlanta and Marietta road to the right of that place; bivouacked for the night, having marched some five miles. July 4, advanced one-half mile; bivouacked in line. July 5, marched some five miles and bivouacked on the railroad near Chattahoochee River. July 6, threw up works. July 9, advanced our line one-half mile and threw up works. July 11, enemy having evacuated their works and crossed the river in the night, we moved to the left one mile and camped on the Atlanta road near Pace's Ferry, relieving a regiment of the Fourth Corps. July 17, cross the river on pontoons; moved three-fourths of a mile and bivouacked for the night. July 18, moved forward two miles and bivouacked. July 19, moved for- ward, passing the First Division; halt near Peach Tree Creek; about 6 p. m. I received orders to cross Peach Tree Creek with my regiment, to be supported by the Eighty-second Indiana. We moved down to the creek and, finding a ford, moved over; formed along the bank; deployed, moving forward on the double-quick, driving the rebel skirmishers before us; threw up slight works and remained on the skirmish line during the night. July 21, moved forward one- half mile and bivouacked in second line. July 22, enemy having fallen back to their works around Atlanta, we moved forward to 784 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHaP. L. within some three miles of the city and threw up works in the third line. July 23, the regiment was ordered to move to the left to the support of General King's brigade, of the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps; moved over and built works; at dark moved back to our position in the brigade. July 25, relieved a portion of the Twenty-third Missouri in front line of works. August 3, moved to the right about four miles, crossing Utoy Creek, taking position about 10 p. m.; worked all night on breast- works. August 4, went out on reconnaissance, covering (in con- junction with Twenty-third Missouri and Eighty-second Indiana) the flank of the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps; moved forward about one mile, and at dark returned to our works. August 5, moved short distance to the left and front; threw up line of works on the front line, connecting the Ninety-second Ohio and right of General Hascall's division, Twenty-third Corps. The casualties in the regiment from May 7 to August 6, 1864, are- Killed, 2 enlisted men; wounded, 1 lieutenant and 12 enlisted men. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, C. H. CARLTON, Colonel Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry. Capt. W. B. CURTIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. HEADQUARTERS EIGHTY-NINTH OHIO INFANTRY, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 1864. SIR: I have the honor to transmit the following report of the part taken in the campaign by the Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry from the 7th of August to the 8th of September, 1864: August 7, the regiment was lying in front line of works near Utoy Creek. After dark regiment moved forward about 150 yards and threw up works. 8th, were relieved and moved back to our former works. 11th, moved to the right about one and a half miles and re- lieved Tenth Illinois, of General Davis' division. 19th, moved out on Sandtown road at 2 a. m. as a support for Twenty-third Army Corps; at dark returned to our former position. 20th, moved to the right two and a half miles at 3 a. m. to protect the right flank of our line; at dark moved back to our former position. 27th, moved to the right three and a half miles and bivouacked for the night. 28th, moved forward and crossed the Montgomery railroad and bivouacked for the night about a half mile from the road. 30th, marched at 6.30 a. m.; halted for the night and threw up works near the Jonesborough road, about seven miles from that place. 31st, moved forward three-fourths of a mile; built works. About 12 m. moved forward one mile; threw up a second line of works. Having halted a short time the regiment moved forward with orders to go to the railroad if possible. The skirmish line of the regiment reached the railroad, meeting with but slight resistance from the enemy. The telegraph wire was cut by corps signal officer. Being two miles from support and appearances indicating that the enemy were mov- ing to our left and rear, the skirmish line was withdrawn. They had barely reached the reserve when orders were received to hold the railroad, and the line was advanced a second time. The Seventy- fifth Indiana having joined as a support before we reached the rail- road, the Eighty-second Indiana and Thirty-first Ohio arrived and the four regiments took possession of the railroad and threw up works during the night. CHMP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 785 September I, assisted in destroying the railroad. Moved back and joined our brigade at 11 a. m. and moved to the right about three miles. A portion of our division being warmly engaged with the enemy, we moved forward at a double-quick and took up a position under fire. The force engaged having taken the enemy's works, held them; we threw up slight works and bivouacked for the night. 2d, enemy having evacuated the town in the night, we moved a short distance toward Jonesborough and threw up a line of works facing north. At dark we moved one mile to the east and south of Jones- borough,;threw up works, and bivouacked for the night. 6th, moved toward Atlanta and bivouacked for the night about two miles from Jonesborough. 7th, moved north and bivouacked for the night about two miles north of Rough and Ready. 8th, moved to White Hall and went into camp about two miles from Atlanta. The following number of casualties occurred in the regiment from 7th August to September 8, 1864: Wounded, 1 commissioned officer and 7 enlisted men. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, C. H. CARLTON, ColoneT Eighty-ninth Ohio Infantry. Capt. W. B. CURTIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. No. 156. Reports of Col. Benjamin D. Fearing, Ninety-second Ohio Infantry. HDQRS. NINETY-SECOND REGT. OHIO VOL. INFANTRY, Camp in the Field, August 16, 1864. SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Ninety-second Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry dur- ing the campaign of the past three months now ending Breaking up our camps at Ringgold, Ga., on the 7th of May, stripped of all incumbrances of material and men, we marched with the brigade to and through Tunnel Hill and sat down in front of the enermy's stronghold at Dalton. Moving with the brigade on the 12th day of May to the right, along the base of John's Mountain through Snake Creek Gap, we first met the enemy on the morning of the 14th of May. In line of battle, in the first line, on the left of 'the brigade, we followed the enemy, steadily pushing him back with our heavy lines of skirmishers, until he was forced to take refuge in his works in front of Resaca. Gaining the ridge in plain view of the rebel works, I had portions of my command engaged during the after- noon advantageously posted as sharpshooters. In the day's oper- ations we had 2 men killed and 2 wounded. Taken from the line in the evening, on the morning of the 15th we moved to the right, and on the morning of the 16th we entered Resaca with the brigade. We followed the retreating enemy over the Oostenaula River and to the banks of the Etowah, where with the army we rested. Again we moved forward on the 23d of May, fording the Etowah, crossing the Euharlee, and marched to Raccoon Creek, returning with the brigade to escort a supply train from Kingston to the army in the field. Returning we joined our division near Dallas, Ga., and with 50 R R-VOL XXXVIII, PT I 786 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [COHAP. L. the brigade acted as train guard for the corps train until the 11th of June at Acworth, Ga., when we were relieved and went into the front line, taking part in the movement that forced the enemy to evacuate his works on Pine Knob. Swinging forward through the blinding rain and dense thickets on the morning of the 18th of June, in reserve to the brigade, we saw the enemy driven from their last line of works north of Kenesaw Mountain. Skirmishers from my command took an active part on the 19th of June in forcing the enemy from the valley to take shelter among the rocks on the side of Kenesaw. During the sharp and protracted skirmish of the 19th and 20th I had 1 officer wounded, 1 man killed and I man wounded. It may not be out of place to mention here the operations of the skirmish line from my command on the 21st of June, as the amount of ammunition expended during that tour of duty may serve to exhibit the pertinacity of some of the many skirmishers, they being the most important feature in this remarkable campaign. The de- tail from the command was 200 men, under the command of Lieu- tenant-Colonel Morrow, Ninety-second Ohio. It was while the bri- gade was operating around the base of Kenesaw Mountain explicit orders were given the officers in charge of the lines that they were to permit no firing unless it was absolutely necessary. Yet during the tour of twenty-four hours, the firing being as incessant through the night as in the day, they expended 24,000 rounds of cartridges. So extraordinary did this seem to me, that I was careful to learn if some of this was not consumed extravagantly, but all the officers united in saying that it was not. On the Kenesaw line we moved with the brigade, occupying with it various important positions on that line. On the morning of the 3d of July we moved over the abandoned works of the enemy through Marietta, Ga., and followed the enemy until we found him some four miles southwest of Mari- etta in works. We took no part as a regiment in forcing the enemy from this line; but on his falling back to the new line on the north bank of the Chattahoochee, we followed in close pursuit, and again found the enemy confronting us behind strong works. Here we operated with the brigade in the movements that compelled the enemy to abandon his position, burn the bridges, and give us all the territory north of the river. After a few days of rest we again took up the line of march, crossing the Chattahoochee at Pace's Ferry on the 17th of July, 1864. Acting with the brigade, we wrested one of the fords over Peach Tree Creek from the enemy and secured a lodgment on the south bank with no loss of life. Moving forward on the 22d of July, we went into line in front of Atlanta, in the movement losing but 1 man, wounded by shell. Remaining on that line until the 3d of August, when the brigade commenced the movement to the right, crossing Utoy Creek at Her- ring's Mill, and to this date have taken part with the brigade in the important moves made on the lines of the Fourteenth Corps. We are in an intrenched camp, healthily located, with the enemy in our immediate front, our line running nearly parallel with, and not very far removed from, the Macon railroad. Though we have taken part in all the movements of the First Brigade, it has been our good for- tune in all the campaigns to retain each company organization in- tact. During the incessant skirmishing, running back to the very inception of the campaign, the battle in miniature of 100 days' dura- tion, we have had the honor to take part in some of the most bril- liant, `i~-;---~~- CI___ILIII-I- ------_- ------IX--LI--S~ -11I__I____-_1_~*-__1 - ---I- CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 787 Seemingly not worthy of official mention, recurring so often, yet I find by the official reports of the commanding officers of the com- panies that each company has, at different points in the campaign when detached from my command, taken active part in the advances of the lines, by which important positions have been gained, many prisoners and arms taken; and the officers in charge have handled their men with so much care, precision, and skill, and they them- selves have acted their part so gallantly as to gain our admiration and esteem. I cannot commend too highly the men of my command for the part taken in the arduous labors of the campaign. Ever willing to do and dare everything, working with the ax, pick, and spade through the day, and, without a murmur, continuing the labor through the long watches of the night, they have thrown up two temporary works and constructed twelve lines of field-works complete, and in addition remodeled many works that in the shift- ing of the lines we have occupied and found incomplete. Your in- spector will report the condition and effectiveness of my command at the present time. My reports will give you our effective strength as compared with it at the opening of the campaign. Appended please find report of casualties,* men sent to hospital and retured to duty. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, BENJ. D. FEARING, Colonel Ninety-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Capt. W. B. CURTIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., lst Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. HDQRS. NINETY-SECOND REGT. OHIO VOL. INFANTRY, Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 1864. SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Ninety-second Regiment Ohio Volunteers in the late movements of the army that resulted in our occupation of the city of Atlanta: Field report made on the 16th of August gave you our operations to that date. Passing over the days of incessant skirmishing, and the minor moves made in them, we come to the retiring of our lines from the enemy's front on the morn of the 27th of August. It was a difficult feat to perform, so close were the lines of the enemy, and doubly so that early. , In the evening they discovered that we were making changes in the lines, and all night we were subjected to a heavy fire from the enemy's batteries, but we left the line before daylight and drew off without the loss of a man. Equally fortunate were the skirmishers in our front. We moved down the Sandtown road less than a mile, when we acted with the brigade in covering the trains of the Army of the Cumberland, going into line of battle and making arrangements for a vigorous defense of these important trains so much imperiled. After the trains were in safety we moved forward with the brigade; acted as escort to the trains of the army. On the 28th of August, relieved of this duty, we moved with the brigade during the day's march, crossing the Montgomery railroad near Red Oak, Ga., and going into camp one-half mile south of the road, where we remained until August 30, when we moved toward the Macon railroad. On the evening of the 30th ordered on picket * Shows 3 men killed and 1 officer and 15 men wounded. . .... .I..", ..........r r T88 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGNW. [CHAP. L. with my regiment; advanced the lines as ordered by you. On the morning of the 31st of August, with my regiment, I was ordered to move forward and build bridges over Flint River and the canal near the river (creek), secure a lodgment on the south bank of Flint, and command the approaches to the bridges. In this move I was ably supported by Colonel Ward, of the Seventeenth Ohio. We passed the canal and the Flint, meeting with no opposition from the enemy; moved forward and secured a fine position commanding the Atlanta and Jonesborough road. Striking this road at two points, we discovered a column of the enemy east of the road moving south on a by-road between the Jonesborough road and the railroad. Here we secured 12 prisoners. We here awaited the brigade, and with them went into camp at this point. Moving with the brigade, Sep- tember 1, south on the Jonesborough pike, we went into the second line, the brigade forming line of battle one mile from Jonesborough. With the brigade we took part in the action of the 1st of September at Jonesborough. After the evacuation of this point by the enemy, with the brigade we guarded the approaches to the town from the east, and on the 6th of September, the campaign being at an end, we withdrew, covering the withdrawal of our corps to this point. Appended please find report of casualties* from the 6th day of August to the 8th day of September, 1864. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, BENJ. D. FEARING, Colonel Ninety-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Capt. W. B. CURTIS, Assistant Adjutant-General. No. 157. Reports of Col. Newell Gleason, Eighty-seventh Indiana Infantry, commanding Second Brigade. HDQRS. SECOND BRIG., THIRD DIV., 14TH ARMY CORPS, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 16, 1864. SIR: In compliance with orders, I have the honor to report the part taken by the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, in the campaign extending from May 7 to August 6, 1864. This brigade-composed of the Ninth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Col. G. Kammerling; Second Regiment Minnesota Veteran Volun- teers, Col. James George; Eighty-seventh Regiment Indiana Vol- unteers, Col. N. Gleason; Seventy-fifth Regiment Indiana Volun- teers, Lieut. Col. W. O'Brien; One hundred and first Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. Thomas Doan; One hundred and fifth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Lieut. Col. George T. Perkins; Thirty-fifth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Maj. Joseph L. Budd-under command of Col. F. Van Derveer, Thirty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, left Ringgold, Ga., May 7, 1864, and moved with the division to Tunnel Hill, thence in front of Buzzard Roost Gap, where it remained two days, but was not engaged. Thence on the 12th marched through Snake Creek Gap to Sugar Valley, and took position in line with the army, confronting the rebel works near Resaca, where the bri- * Shows 1 man killed and 5 men wounded, "~ ~ ' " ' " "' " "" "-- - -..l---lr~ -~--l _ _ - - -- - . . .^~ CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 789 gade was under fire of the enemy's guns during the 14th and 15th, but was not engaged, except on the 14th, the Thirty-fifth Ohio being on the skirmish line. The fortifications of the enemy being evacu- ated on the night of the 15th, the brigade followed in pursuit of the enemy through Resaca, Calhoun, Adairsville, Kingston, to a position on the railroad near Cassville Station, and remained in camp three days. At this place the term of service of the Ninth Ohio having nearly expired, this regiment left the brigade. Hav- ing been supplied with rations and forage for twenty days, on the 23d the brigade, with the division, moved across the Etowah River; thence, guarding the transportation of the army, marched through Burnt Hickory; thence to Pumpkin Vine Creek, near Dallas, remain- ing one night. Returned with the transportation to Burnt Hickory, and camped until the 2d of June, when the division was ordered to the front. On the 3d the brigade took position in front of the en- emy, on Pumpkin Vine Creek, east of Dallas, deployed in one line, and intrenched. The skirmishing was very active during the occu- pation of this position. The enemy having evacuated on the night of the 6th, the next morning the brigade moved to a point about three miles from Acworth and camped. June 10, moved to a posi- tion in front of Pine Mountain. June 11, moved forward and to the left about one and a half miles; formed in line of battle and camped, the skirmishers being engaged with the enemy. June 14, moved one mile south, skirmishing quite sharply with the enemy; lost several men; formed in line of battle and intrenched. June 15, the enemy having left our immediate front, the brigade moved forward about one mile and a quarter and intrenched, the skirmish- ers being engaged as the advance was made. June 17, the enemy slowly withdrawing, the brigade advanced and took position on a ridge held by the skirmishers, and again intrenched. Enemy's skir- mishers made an attack about midnight, causing the brigade to stand to arms. June 18, advanced line by left wheel about a mile and intrenched under heavy fire of artillery and musketry. The Second Minnesota and Thirty-fifth Ohio advanced into an open field under a heavy fire from the enemy's main line4 of works, and thor- oughly intrenched themselves, the lines then being so near that the musketry from our lines silenced, to a great extent, the enemy's artillery. The brigade lost quite severely in this movement. En- emy evacuated during the night. June 19, moved about one mile and took a position in front of Kenesaw Mountain, and intrenched, where the brigade lay under a heavy fire of artillery and sharp skirmishing, which continued daily. On the night of the 22d moved about one-fourth of a mile to the right and occupied a similar posi- tion, but nearer the enemy and more exposed to his fire. In mak- ing this movement the Second Minnesota Volunteers lost several men by shells. While occupying this position the men of the bri- gade were closely confined to their intrenchments on account of the severe shelling of the enemy. On the night of the 26th the bri- gade, with the division, moved some two or three miles to the right and bivouacked in rear of the Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. June 27, Col. F. Van Derveer, having been for some time in bad health and unfit for duty, received leave of absence. I as- sumed command of the brigade. An assault having been ordered upon the enemy's line by the Second Division, our division was ordered to support the assaulting column. My brigade formed in two lines, and moved forward in support of the Second Brigade, 790 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. Second Division, but the charge proving unsuccessful my command was not engagd with the enemy. Remained in camp at and near this position until July 3, when, the enemy having evacuated, we moved about five miles south of Marietta and camped. July 4, received orders to proceed with my brigade to Marietta and garrison that town, with instructions to preserve public and private property as I found it. These orders were strictly and faith- fully obeyed; besides, the brigade did a large amount of work in policing the town and doing guard and picket duty; in receiving and sending North a large number of factory employes from Roswell and other places. July 13, rejoined our division at Vining's Station. July 16, the Second Minnesota Veteran Volunteers detached and ordered to Marietta. July 17, crossed the Chattahoochee River and moved forward, crossing Peach Tree Creek on the night of the 19th; took a position on the ridge south of said creek and built intrench- ments. July 20, my skirmishers moved forward and occupied the enemy's advanced works in our front. Afterward the Thirty-fifth Ohio was sent forward as skirmishers to hold said works with the intention of moving the front line of the brigade to said position. This regiment executed this movement in a very commendable man- ner, but not without considerable loss. Capt. L. F. Daugherty was instantly killed and several enlisted men wounded. Captain Daugh- erty was a worthy officer, having nearly completed his term of serv- ice. My brigade being relieved by a brigade from the First Divis- ion, Fourteenth Army Corps, which came forward and occupied the position held by the Thirty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, I moved a short distance to the right, and remained in reserve in rear of our division. We were severely shelled during the engagement with the Twentieth Corps on our left, and had several casualties in the brigade. Lieut. Col. William O'Brien, Seventy-fifth Indiana, received a wound in the hand which resulted in the amputation of two fingers. July 21, moved forward, driving the enemy's skir- mishers, and took position on a high ridge, and built intrenchments. During the night the enemy evacuated their works. July 22, moved forward with our division and took position in line of battle in front of Atlanta and built heavy intrenchments, where we remained under fire of the enemy's guns until the 3d of August, when, with the division, we moved about four miles to the right of Atlanta, and took position on the right flank of the army and again intrenched. The Thirty-fifth Ohio Volunteers detached August 2, their term of service having nearly expired. August 4, I was ordered by the general commanding the division to move forward with my brigade in advance of the general line and reconnoiter the enemy's position. Forming my command in two lines, the One hundred and fifth Ohio and Eighty-seventh Indi- ana forming the front, the Seventy-fifth Indiana and One hundred and first Indiana the second line, I pushed forward with a heavy line of skirmishers in front and took two lines of the enemy's skirmish pits, capturing 25 prisoners. The advance was made to a point so near the enemy's main works as to fully develop his line. The object of the movement being accomplished, in obedience to orders the brigade returned to its old position. The brigade was under a heavy fire of artillery and musketry, having 26 casualties. August 5, the information obtained the evening previous developed the im- portance of advancing the line along the whole division front, but the enemy had occupied his old position with heavy re-enforcements CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 791 and, as afterward learned, with orders to hold the position at all events. Having a knowledge of the ground, a plan for the advance was arranged with the other brigades of the division, and a sudden assault upon the enemy's works with a heavy skirmish line, sup- ported by a regiment from each of the brigades, resulted in taking the enemy's works and capturing about 140 prisoners by the division, 62 of whom were captured by my brigade. Our lines were immedi- ately formed along the captured works, and strong breast-works built, but before they were completed the enemy opened a heavy artillery fire upon the brigade, but the advanced condition of our works afforded material protection. August 6, no change of posi- tion, but as the fire of the enemy's artillery was severe the work of strengthening the intrenchments was continued. The occupation of this position must be regarded as important, as it strengthened the line and resulted in its advancement for some distance on our right. During the whole of this laborious and eventful campaign the officers and enlisted men of this brigade have at all times mani- fested that patience and cheerful attention to duty for which they have heretofore been so signally distinguished. Where all have done so well it would seem unjust to discriminate. I cannot, how- ever, fail to commend the faithful conduct of Lieut. Col. W. O'Brien, commanding Seventy-fifth Indiana Volunteers; Lieut. Col. Thomas Doan, One hundred and first Indiana Volunteers; Lieut. Col. J. W. Bishop, Second Minnesota Veteran Volunteers; Lieut. Col. E. P. Hammond, Eighty-seventh Indiana Volunteers; Lieut. Col. George T. Perkins, One hundred and fifth Ohio Volunteers, and Maj. Joseph L. Budd, Thirty-fifth Ohio Volunteers; also Maj. C. J. McCole, commanding Seventy-fifth Indiana Volunteers since July 20, and Maj. Charles G. Edwards, commanding One hundred and fifth Ohio Volunteers, in support of the skirmish line during the advance on August 5, and Maj. R. C. Sabin, Eighty-seventh Indiana Volunteers, commanding skirmish line, all of whom have handled their respec- tive commands with promptness and ability. These officers deserve great credit for their gallant, strict, and faithful execution of orders on all occasions. There are many line officers and enlisted men who deserve special mention, but the limits of this report will only allow me to respectfully refer to the reports of regimental com- manders. When the brigade left Ringgold the effective force num- bered 2,549. Two regiments, the Ninth Ohio and Thirty-fifth Ohio, have left the brigade on account of the expiration of their term of service. The Second Minnesota is still absent. Effective force present in four regiments, 1,120. Casualties of four regiments: Killed. Wounded. Total. Command. 87th Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. E. P. Hammond.... 3 1 23 1 26 27 75th Indiana Volunteers, Maj. C. J. McCole .................... 6 1 19 1 25 26 101st Indiana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. Thomas Doan......... 2 2 2 30 32 105th Ohio Volunteers, Lieut. Col. George T. Perkins ........ 4 1 29 1 33 34 Total 9.. ................................ ......15 5 99 5 114 119 T92 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. tCHAP. L. The casualties of the Second Minnesota and Thirty-fifth Ohio Reg- iments will bear a proportional average with the above regiments, including 1 officer in each regiment killed. The members of the bri- gade staff-Capt. Clinton A. Cilley, acting assistant adjutant-gen- eral; Capt. Samuel L'Hommedieu, assistant inspector-general; Capt. Sanford Fortner, provost-marshal; Capt. M. D. Ellis, topographical engineer; Lieut. C. C. Colborn, acting aide-de-camp; Lieut. W. H. Osborn, acting commissary of subsistence; Lieut. W. H. Conner, acting assistant quartermaster-have faithfully discharged the duties of their respective departments. Captains Cilley and L'Hommedieu having been absent since July 15, Captains Fortner and Ellis have performed their duties, the former that of acting assistant adjutant- general, the latter acting inspector, in a highly efficient manner. I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant, N. GLEASON, Colonel Eighty-seventh Indiana Vols., Comdg. Brigade. Maj. JAMES A. LOWRIE, Assistant Adjutant-General. HDQRS. SECOND BRIG., THIRD Div., 14TH ARMY CORPS, Atlanta, a., September -, 1864. SIR: In compliance with orders, I have the honor to report the part taken by the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, since last report (to August 6, 1864), of which this is a con- tinuation. My command-the One hundred and first Regiment Indiana Vol- unteers, Lieut. Col. Thomas Doan; Eighty-seventh Regiment In- diana Volunteers, Lieut. Col. E. P. Hammond; Seventy-fifth Regi- ment Indiana Volunteers, Maj. C. J. McCole; One hundred and fifth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Lieut. Col. G. T. Perkins; Second Regiment Minnesota Veteran Volunteers, Lieut. Col. J. W. Bishop, the latter regiment rejoining the brigade August 20-remained in position as indicated in last report until August 10, when a brigade on our right was relieved by deploying the four regiments first mentioned on the front line. This new position was near and in plain view of the enemy's works. For several days in front of my command picket-firing ceased, during which time quite a number of deserters from the enemy came into our lines. August 18, ordered to strengthen the skirmish line and fire upon the enemy for two hours. This was executed vigorously, a portion of the line firing from the main works ; the enemy was seen to take from his line wounded men. August 19, moved my command at daylight one mile west on the Sandtown road; being relieved by troops of the Third Brigade of this division, returned to old position again at night; this movement was not discovered by the enemy. August 27, having been supplied with fifteen days' rations and forage, my command moved with the division at daylight along the Sandtown road about three miles, and near Utoy Creek went into position; intrenched and camped for the night. August 28, marched at daylight; crossed the Atlanta and Alabama railroad about five miles west of the junction of this and the Macon railroad; moving about one mile south, went into position facing east; intrenched and camped. August 30, marched to near Couch's house, took position, intrenched, and camped until noon next day. August 31, marched to a position nearly one mile in advance CHAP. L.1 REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OP THE CUMBERLAND. 793 of the main line of the army near the Macon railroad, and in- trenched. Detached the Seventy-fifth Indiana and sent it forward to said road to operate with other troops. September 1, marched south on the road from Rough and Ready to Jonesborough and formed in position with the division, with the left of my line resting upon the railroad. I was immediately in rear of the Third Brigade, with the First Brigade on my right. My com- mand was formed in an open field, the Eighty-seventh Indiana on the right and the Seventy-fifth Indiana on the left, in the front line; the One hundred and fifth Ohio and One hundred and first Indiana in the second line, and the Second Minnesota forming a third line in rear of the brigade center. The troops in front having driven the enemy through a belt of woods, I was ordered to follow the First Brigade by the flank. This was done, preserving the formation of my brigade as above described. When nearly through the woods, and as the First Brigade was filing to the right into position again, the attack in our front was heavy. Keeping my troops well closed up, when I had passed the woods I filed to the right into position with two lines at the same time, and occupied the line which the brigade in my front had just left. When I had swung into line my left rested upon the railroad as before. In this position my com- mand commenced making temporary works, which was prosecuted under a heavy fire of artillery and musketry from the enemy. The assault of the Third Brigade having been made, the troops in my front moved forward so as to leave vacant one line, which had been occupied. I instantly moved my brigade forward and occupied that line, and this brought my command in support of a brigade (Colonel Moore's) of the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. In this position intrenchments were made, and we bivouacked for the night. Although not engaged with the enemy in the grand and successful assault of his works at Jonesborough, my command kept well closed up in support under a heavy fire of artillery, and did all as a supporting column that was required. Officers and enlisted men all behaved splendidly, and deserve great praise for the gallant and determined manner in which they moved forward to meet the enemy. The casualties of the brigade during this engagement were 1 killed and 7 wounded. September 2, moved a half mile and camped. Afterward moved one mile and camped again, where the brigade remained until about noon on the 6th, when we marched two miles and formed in position in line of battle facing south. September 7, marched to Rough and Ready and camped in line of battle. September 8, marched and went into camp near Atlanta, taking position in line facing southward. No better evidence can be seen of the glorious success of the four months' campaign, so brilliantly closed, than is discovered in the fine physical condition of the troops, as well as the glowing enthusiasm that pervades all camps. The effective force of the five regiments herein mentioned when the brigade left Ringgold, Ga., May 7, 1864, was-commissioned officers, 100; enlisted men, 1,892; total, 1,992. Casualties: Killed-commissioned officers, 2; enlisted men, 23; total, 25. Wounded-commissioned officers, 6; enlisted men, 156; total, 162. Missing-commissioned officers, none; enlisted men, 4; total, 4. Sent to the rear sick-commissioned .officers, 8; enlisted men, 354; total 362. Effective force September 9-commissioned officers, 87; enlisted men, 1,491; total, 1,578. "*raR1CFs _ ~~C6I~BO~P$I 794 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN.L [CrAP. L. The number of men joined brigade is not shown in the above statement, which accounts for difference in aggregate. I again take pleasure in commending the gallant conduct of the commanding officers of regiments before enumerated, as well as the other officers and enlisted men of my command. All have nobly done their duty. The brigade staff-Capt. Clinton A. Cilley, assistant adjutant-gen- eral; Capt. M. D. Ellis, acting inspector-general; Capt. Sanford Fortner, provost-marshal; Lieut. Cora C. Colborn, acting aide-de- camp; Lieut. W. H. Osborn, acting commissary of subsistence; Lieut. W. HI. Conner, acting assistant quartermaster-have my thanks for the prompt and efficient discharge of their various duties, rendering such assistance as to make the command of this brigade a pleasure. I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant, N. GLEASON, Colonel Eighty-seventh Indiana Vols., Comdg. Brig. Maj. JAMES A. LOWRIE, Assistant .Adjutant-General. No. 158. Reports of Maj. Cyrus J. McCole, Seventy-fifth Indiana Infantry. HDQRS. SEVENTY-FIFTH REGIMENT INDIANA VOLS., Near Atlanta, Ga., August 17, 1864. I have the honor to make the following report of this regiment and its doings during the time mentioned in circular : As this regiment has been engaged in no special or detached serv- ice, and has at all times acted under the immediate observation of the brigade commander, and only in concert with the brigade, I deem it unnecessary here to mention such facts as must be equally within your knowledge, and are not relative to this regiment alone. The casualties in this regiment during the time are-Lieut. Col. William O'Brien, severely wounded in hand; enlisted men killed, 6; enlisted men wounded, 19. Very respectfully, &c., C. J. McCOLE, Major, Commanding Regiment. Capt. S. FORTNER, A. A. A. G., 2d Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. IDQRS. SEVENTY-FIFTH REGIMENT INDIANA VOLS., Near Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864. I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this regiment since last report; also a statement of the strength of regiment May 7, 1864, and casualties since that time. I do not con- sider it necessary to mention the marches, &c., of this regiment that were performed jointly with the command, and under your imme- diate observation. That omitted, leaves but the operations of Au- gust 31 and the morning of September 1, 1864, to report. During that time this regiment was connected with the expedition under CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 795 command of Colonel Hunter, of the Eighty-second Indiana, which had for its object the destruction of the railroad between Atlanta and Macon, Ga. That object was successfully and efficiently accom- plished, this regiment taking an active part, laboring without any intermission in building fortifications and in destroying the railroad track, until ordered to rejoin the command. The effective strength of this regiment was- May 7, 1864: Offi cers ........................................................ 21 Enlisted m en ................................................... 403 ----- 424 September 9, 1864: Offi cers .......................................................... 17 Enlisted men ................................................... 309 326 98 Accounted for as follows: Company C, detailed to guard medical supplies ............................. 27 Sick, sent away, greater than number returned ................... ......... 27 W ounded, not fatally . ..................................................... 23 Killed and died of wounds ......... ....................... 9 Detached as hospital attendants, &c ........................................ 12 Total ................................................................ 98 C. J. McCOLE, Major, Commanding Regiment. Captain CILLEY, Assistant Adjutant-General. Second Brigade. No. 159. Reports of Lieut. Col. Edwin P. Hammond, Eighty-seventh Indiana Infantry. HDQRS. EIGHTY-SEVENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEERS, Near Atlanta, Gd., August 16, 1864. CAPTAIN: In compliance with orders received from brigade head- quarters, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this regiment from the commencement of the campaign up to the 6th of the present month: On the morning of the 7th of May, 1864, the Eighty-seventh Indiana Volunteers, then commanded by Col. N. Gleason, moved forward from Ringgold in the direction of Tunnel Hill, near which place we remained, participating in the movements of the brigade in front of Buzzard Roost until the 12th, when we moved to the right and passed through Snake Creek Gap. Moving forward on the 13th and 14th, in the evening of the latter day we took position on a ridge in front of the enemy's works at Re- saca. On the 15th we moved about two miles to the right and halted in reserve on the left of the Fifteenth Corps. The enemy evacuated his works during the night. On the 16th we moved into Resaca, and remained till the 17th, when we moved forward, crossing the river, and continuing the march till the 19th, when we halted on the railroad, two miles south of Kingston. We remained at this '-~~~PswOWOWAMs p ae ~ r*91~ 796 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CaP. L. place till the 23d, when we moved to the right, crossing the Etowah River, and going into camp five miles this side of the same. On the 26th, the wagon train being placed under the guard of our brigade, we moved forward with it to a place on the road near Burnt Hickory. This regiment on the 27th guarded the train to the front on Pump- kin Vine Creek, and, returning two miles, camped over night, and the following day, with the balance of the brigade, guarded another train to the front. On the 29th we moved back to Burnt Hickory, and remained till June 1, when we moved near the front of the ene- my's position at Dallas. We moved to the front the following day and relieved troops of the First Division of this corps. Here we had considerable skirmishing with the enemy. On the 6th, the enemy having evacuated his position during the night, we moved forward a few miles, went in camp, and remained till the 10th, when we marched in the direction of Kenesaw Mountain. We moved to the left on the 11th, and remained in camp till the 14th. We moved forward in line of battle on this day, a detail from the regiment being upon the skirmish line. We lost 1 man killed and 1 wounded. Moving forward about one-half mile on the 15th, we formed in the second line of the brigade and intrenched. After remaining in this position till the 17th we moved forward about three-fourths of a mile, and took position in the first line. Moving forward again on the 18th, we wheeled to the left, formed in the second line, and made works. Being exposed to the enemy's fire of artillery and musketry during this day, we had 2 men severely wounded. It being discovered on the morning of the 19th that the enemy had abandoned his works in our front, we moved forward till we came up to his position on Kenesaw Mountain; formed in the first line and intrenched. There was skirmishing and heavy cannonading at this place. On the night of the 22d, the brigade moving a short distance to the right, three companies of this regiment were placed in an advanced and exposed position. The balance of the regiment formed in the second line. Heavy skirmishing and cannonading continued day and night. On the 26th Colonel Gleason was assigned to the command of the bri- gade, and I assumed command of this regiment. We moved to the right three miles this day, and on the following day with this division supported the Second Division in an unsuccessful charge upon the enemy's works. On the evening of the 30th we moved to the right and occupied a part of the works of the Twentieth Corps, which had just moved still farther to the right. The enemy evacuating his works at Kenesaw Mountain on the night of July 2, we moved forward on the 3d, passing to the right of Marietta, and halting some four miles south of that place. On the 4th we returned with the brigade to Marietta, where we remained till the 13th, my command performing provost duty. We then marched to the Chattahoochee River and went into camp near the railroad bridge. Crossing the river on pontoon bridges on the 17th, and moving forward on the 18th and 19th, we crossed Peach Tree Creek on the evening of the latter date, formed in the first line, and fortified. On the morning of the 20th we moved forward a short distance, and, being much exposed to the fire of the enemy's skir- mishers, Lieutenant Leiter and 3 men of this regiment received severe wounds. About noon we moved to the right to a less exposed position, our brigade being relieved from the front, where we re- mained until the evening of the following day, when we moved to the front under the fire of the enemy's skirmishers. and formed in the CHAP. L.] REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 797 first line. During the night the enemy evacuated his works in our front and fell back to his fortifications around Atlanta. Moving up in front of that city on the 22d, we formed in the second line and in- trenched. We remained in this position till August 3, when we moved to the right five miles, took position in the first line and made works. In the afternoon of the 4th, moving in the first line of the brigade, we made a reconnaissance to the front, and while advancing under the fire of the enemy's musketry and artillery, my command lost 1 killed and 16 wounded. After it became sufficiently dark to conceal our movements we retired to our works. We advanced again on the 5th, assisted in the capture of about 100 prisoners, and, wheeling to the left, formed in the second line. We had scarcely commenced our works before the enemy opened upon us from several of his batteries, giving us a terrible shelling, but we held our position and continued with the construction of our works. We lost this day 1 killed and 1 severely wounded. Several others were injured from fragments of shells, but not disabled. Nothing of special import- ance occurred on the 6th. On the 7th of May, when we left Ringgold, the aggregate effective force of this regiment was 357. Our casualties have been as fol- lows: Killed-enlisted men, 3. Wounded-commissioned officers, 1; enlisted men, 23. Sent to the rear from. sickness-commissioned officers, 2; enlisted men, 91. I cannot commend too highly the patience and cheerfulness with which the officers and men of my command have performed their duties during the present campaign, nor praise too greatly their good conduct at all times in the presence and under the fire of the enemy. Where all have behaved so well it would be out of place to mention particular instances of gallant conduct. It is, however, but justice to Major Sabin, and no exception can be taken to the state- ment, to say that he has at several times in our advance upon the enemy's works had command of the skirmish line of the brigade, and that he has on all occasions displayed a bravery and skill which have rendered his operations entirely successful. I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, E. P. HAMMOND, Lieutenant-Colonel, Comdg. Eighty-seventh Indiana Vols. Capt. S. FORTNER, A. A. A. G., 2d Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. HDQRS. EIGHTY-SEVENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEERS, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864. SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the oper- ations of this command since August 7, 1864, the date to which my last report was made: At that time my command occupied a position in the second line of the brigade, which was in the front near the enemy's works at Utoy Creek. Our pickets were constantly engaged, and we were exposed to an almost incessant fire from the enemy's batteries. On Sunday, the 7th of August, an attempt was made to advance the skirmish line, which was unsuccessful on account of the near prox- imity of our picket-line with the enemy's fortifications and rifle-pits. T798 THE ATLANTA CAMPAGNi. [CHAP. L. One man of my command was wounded. On the night of the 10th of August, the brigade forming in one line, I moved up and took position on the right of the Seventy-fifth Indiana, relieving the Eighty-fifth Illinois. Our position here was much exposed, being within short range of the enemy's works and unmasked by an open field. The firing, however, between the pickets ceased for several days by the tacit consent of each party. During this cessation of hostilities, quite a number of the enemy, availing themselves of the opportunity so favorably presented, deserted and came through our lines. A demonstration being made along the line on the 18th, the men of my command fired from their works. This continued for two hours, when the firing ceased. In the front of my line, after this engagement, several of the enemy's wounded were observed being carried off by the stretcher-bearers, though their loss could not have been great as their works afforded them almost perfect protec- tion. Before daylight on the morning of the 19th my command was relieved by troops from the Thirty-eighth Ohio, and moved with the brigade a short distance to the right and rear, where we remained till after dark in the evening, when we returned and occupied our former position. The following day I sent four companies to occu- py the line of the Thirty-first Ohio a few rods to the right, while that regiment was withdrawn from the line. It came back in the evening, and the companies referred to returned to their positions in the regiment. During the 22d of August we were much annoyed by the firing of the enemy's sharpshooters, who partially enfiladed our works from the left. Lieut. John Demuth, of Company C, an excellent officer, received a mortal wound and died in a few moments. We left our position here at 2 o'clock in the morning August 27, and with the army commenced the movement which resulted in the taking of the Atlanta and Macon Railroad, and the evacuation of Atlanta by the enemy. In the successful charge of the Fourteenth Corps, September 1, on the works of the enemy at Jonesborough, this brigade acting as a supporting column, my command took posi- tion on the right in the first line, and advanced with the troops in our front until the enemy was routed, and it became too dark to pro- ceed farther. September 2, we moved a short distance down the railroad. My command was employed in the afternoon in tearing up and destroying the iron and cross-ties. We marched a mile to the east in the evening, and going in camp remained till the 5th, when we started back to this place and arrived here on the 8th. The following table will show the effective strength of this regi- ment on the 7th of May, 1864, the day we left Ringgold, the casual- ties from battle and disease during the campaign, and the present effective strength of the regiment: Effective force May 7-officers, 22; enlisted men, 335. Casualties: wounded-officers, 2; enlisted men, 21. Sent to rear sick-officers, 2; enlisted men, 83. Killed in action-officers, 1; enlisted men, 3. Effective force September 7-officers, 17; enlisted men, 230. I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, E. P. HAMMOND, Lieutenant-Colonel, Comdg. Eighty-seventh Indiana Vols. Capt. C. A. CILLEY, Asst. Adjt. Gen., 2d Brig., 3d Div. 14th Army Corps. CHAP. L]) REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND. 799 No. 160. Repodis of Lieut. Col. Thomas Doan, One hundred and first Indi- ana Infantry. HEADQUARTERS 101ST INDIANA VOLUNTEERS, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 15, 1864. SIR: I have the honor to report concerning operations of this reg- iment from May 7, 1864, to August 6, as follows, to wit: May 7, left Ringgold, passing Tunnel Hill, and lay before Rocky Face Mountain until morning of May 12, 1864, when we marched for Resaca by way of Snake Creek Gap. May 13, 14, and 15, partici- pated in operations in Sugar Creek Valley, near Resaca, with loss of 3 men wounded. May 16, engaged in pursuit of enemy, arriving at Kingston May 19. May 23, marched by way of Burnt Hickory, and on June 2, 3, and 4, participated in operations on Pumpkin Vine Creek, near Dallas, with loss of 5 men wounded. June 14, advanced on Kenesaw Mountain, skirmishing with enemy; intrenched our- selves in seven different positions on the enemy's front, the enemy evacuating July 2. Our loss in front of Kenesaw Mountain, 2 offi- cers and 11 men wounded. July 4, took part with our brigade at Marietta, Ga. July 11, 2 a. m., this regiment was ordered to Acworth, but on our arrival, finding all quiet, returned immediately. July 13, rejoined our divis- ion at Vining's Station. July 17, crossed Chattahoochee River. July 19, with the regiment in advance, the brigade crossed Peach Tree Creek, and on the following day assisted in driving the enemy's pickets; our loss, 2 men severely wounded; made three lines of intrenchments near Peach Tree Creek. July 21, advanced on Atlanta and intrenched in front of enemy's position at that place. August 3, moved to the right several miles, taking up position and intrenching on the right flank of the army. August 4, made armed reconnaissance to the front; assisted in the capture of 25 prisoners. August 5, advanced our lines; assisted in capturing over 100 prisoners. Intrenched in the enemy's immediate front. August 6, lying in same position. Our loss in last three days, 2 en- listed men killed and 7 wounded. Loss: Commissioned officers-wounded, 2. Enlisted men-killed, 2; wounded, 28. Total casualties, 32. Very respectfully, THOS. DOAN, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment. Capt. S. FORTNER, A. A.A. G., 2d Brig., 3d Div., 14th Army Corps. HEADQUARTERS 101ST INDIANA, Near Atlanta, September 9, 1864. CAPTAIN: I have to report as to operations of this regiment since last report-that is to say, since August 6, 1864-as follows: August 7, were occupying an intrenched position three miles south of Atlanta; the enemy close on our front. Here we lost several men killed and wounded. August 13, took up a new position one mile to the right and fortified. Remained here until August 27, when we took up line of march in the direction of Jonesborough, 800 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. [CHAP. L. Ga. During this march we intrenched ourselves in seven different positions. Near Jonesborough, Ga., September 1, we were a part of the column which supported the charge by the Fourteenth Army Corps, but did not become engaged. Remained near Jonesborough until September 6, when we fell back by short marches to this point, where we arrived September 8, 1864. During the whole campaign of 118 days, ending with the capture of Atlanta, we have not been out of hearing of hostile firing twelve hours at a time. Our entire loss is 4 killed, 38 wounded, and I captured. Very respectfully, THOS. DOAN, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment. Effective force of 101st Indiana Volunteers on leaving Ringgold, Ga., May 7,1864 .413 7,1864 .... ... .................... ................ 413 Present effective.......................... ............. ............... 299 Loss . . .............. .................................. 114 Killed ................................................... 4 Missing (captured) ................ ................. ............ Sick, sent to rear and not returned ....................................... 71 W ounded ..... .................................................. 38 114 THOS. DOAN, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment. [Capt. S. FORTNER, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.] No. 161. Reports of Lieut. Col. Judson W. Bishop, Second Minnesota In- fantry. HEADQUARTERS SECOND MINNESOTA VOLUNTEERS, Before Atlanta, Ga., August 26, 1864. CAPTAIN: I have the honor, in accordance with instructions from brigade headquarters, to submit the following summary of the part taken by the Second Regiment Minnesota Volunteers in the oper- ations of the campaign during the three months ending the 6th day of August, 1864: On Saturday, the 7th day of May, the regiment broke camp at 4 a. m., marched at 9 a. m., and arriving at Tunnel Hill (seven miles), bivouacked at noon. Sunday, 8th, marched at 9 a. m. one mile to position on right flank of Fourteenth Army Corps. Monday, 9th, marched at 10 a. m. one-half mile to position on a ridge facing Buz- zard Roost Gap, and one mile distant; marched again at 5 p. m. one-half mile in advance, and bivouacked in position. Tuesday, 10th, and Wednesday, 11th, remained in bivouac. Thursday, 12th, marched at 4 a. m. about fifteen miles to the right and through Snake [Creek] Gap. Friday, 13th, learned that the enemy had evacuated Dalton last night; marched at 10 a. m. four miles toward Resaca, and took position in the general line of battle, facing east. Satur- day, 14th, advanced with heavy skirmishing about a mile, and took position on a ridge facing the enemy's works, at a distance of about 400 yards. Sunday, 15th, moved about three-quarters of a mile to